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Undergraduate Programs
Calendar 2004-05


Faculty of Arts, Including School of Social Work

1 The Faculty

1.1 Location

Dawson Hall
853 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2T6
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-4210
Faculty Website: www.arts.mcgill.ca/arts
Student Affairs Office Website: www.mcgill.ca/artscisao 

The Student Affairs Office and the Office of the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) of the Faculty of Arts are located in Dawson Hall, Rooms 110 and 115. The Student Affairs Office serves students in both the Faculty of Arts and the Faculty of Science.

1.2 Administrative Officers

John Hall; B.A.(Oxon.), M.A.(Penn.), Ph.D.(Lond.Sch. of Economics)

Dean

John Galaty; B.A. (Hartford), M.A.,Ph.D.(Chic.)

Associate Dean (Research and Graduate Studies)

Uli Locher; Ph.D.(Yale)

Associate Dean (Projects and  Technology)

Enrica Quaroni; B.A., Ph.D.(McG.)

Associate Dean
(Student Affairs)

Susan Sharpe

Assistant to the Dean

Sharon Bezeau; B.A.(Tor.), M.A.(C'dia)

Recorder and Chief Invigilator

Donald Sedgwick; B.Sc., M.Sc.(McG.)

Senior Adviser

1.3 Programs and Teaching in Arts

Established in 1843, the Faculty of Arts is one of the oldest in Canada and remains the largest at McGill. With over 5,000 full-time students and over 250 full-time professors, the Faculty offers several hundred courses in many disciplines.

The Faculty of Arts permits students great program flexibility. Students may concentrate on one Arts discipline while obtaining Minor Concentrations in different Arts disciplines as well as in other faculties, such as, for example, Science. McGill's historic Arts building is the centrepiece of the University's downtown campus. It houses classrooms, offices and Moyse Hall - an elegant and well-equipped performance theatre. The Faculty maintains bilateral exchange programs with many universities around the world and encourages students to spend a term or two studying abroad.

McGill Arts graduates are valued for their ability to think critically and communicate effectively, often in more than one language. Their skills in research and analysis are applicable in a wide spectrum of professional fields, such as law, education, business, government, and public service.

The Faculty of Arts offers programs leading to the degrees of B.A. and B.S.W. Admission is selective; fulfilment of the minimum requirements does not guarantee acceptance. Admission criteria are described in Admission Requirements.

The Faculty of Arts also offers a Diploma in Environment under the McGill School of Environment, a 30-credit program available to holders of a B.Sc. or B.A. or equivalent. All credits for the Diploma must be completed at McGill.

Finally, the Faculties of Arts and of Science jointly offer the Bachelor of Arts and Science (B.A.&Sc.) which is described in the Arts & Science section of the Calendar.

1.4 Student Affairs Office

The Student Affairs Office, located in Dawson Hall, provides assistance in interpreting records as well as general academic information and advice on the following: prerequisites and programs, degree requirements, registration, course change, procedures for withdrawal, deferred exams, supplemental exams, rereads, academic standing, inter-faculty transfer, year or term away, transfer credits, second programs, second degrees, and graduation.

Special requests can be made, in writing, to the Associate Dean (Student Affairs).
For more information, please refer to our Website at www.mcgill.ca/artscisao

2 Faculty Admission Requirements

For information about admission requirements to the B.A. or B.S.W., please refer to Admission Requirements.

For information about inter-faculty transfers, please refer to Inter-Faculty Transfer as well as to the relevant information posted on the Students Affairs Office Website at www.mcgill.ca/artscisao and in the Student Affairs Office, Dawson Hall, Room 110.

3 Faculty Degree Requirements

Each student in the Faculty of Arts must be aware of the Faculty regulations as stated in this Calendar.

While departmental and Faculty advisers and staff are always available to give advice and guidance, the ultimate responsibility for completeness and correctness of course selection and registration, for compliance with, and completion of, program and degree requirements, and for the observance of regulations and deadlines rests with the student. It is the student's responsibility to seek guidance from the Student Affairs Office if in any doubt; misunderstanding or misapprehension will not be accepted as cause for dispensation from any regulation, deadline, program or degree requirement.

To be eligible for a B.A. degree, students must fulfil all Faculty and program requirements as indicated below:
Minimum Credit Requirement
Residency
Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
Time Limit for Completion of the Degree
Program Requirements
Course Requirements

3.1 Minimum Credit Requirement

Students must complete the minimum credit requirement for the degree as specified in the letter of admission.

Students are normally admitted to a four-year program requiring the completion of 120 credits, but advanced standing of up to 30 credits may be granted to students who obtain satisfactory results in the Diploma of Collegial Studies, International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, Advanced Levels, and Advanced Placement tests.

Students who are readmitted after interrupting their studies for a period of five consecutive years or more may be required to complete a minimum of 60 credits and satisfy the requirements of a program. In this case, a new GPA will be calculated. The Associate Dean (Student Affairs), in consultation with the appropriate department, may approve a lower minimum for students who had completed 60 credits or more before interrupting their studies.

Students who are readmitted after a period of absence are normally subject to the program and degree requirements in effect at the time of readmission.

3.2 Residency

To obtain a B.A. degree, students must complete satisfactorily a minimum of 60 credits at McGill University towards the fulfilment of the B.A. degree requirements. At least two-thirds of all program requirements (Multi-track, Honours, Faculty) must normally be completed at McGill. In addition, some departments may require that their students complete specific components of their program at McGill.

Exceptionally, and subject to departmental approval, students in a Minor Concentration who pursue an approved study away program may complete up to half of the Minor Concentration requirements elsewhere.

The residency requirement for the Diploma in Environment is 30 credits completed at McGill.

3.3 Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)

Each candidate for a degree must achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.00.

3.4 Time Limit for Completion of the Degree

Students who need 96 or fewer credits to complete their degree requirements are expected to complete their program in no more than eight terms after their initial registration for the degree. For students who change programs, the period of eight terms may be extended by two terms with the approval of the students' department and the Associate Dean (Student Affairs). Students in the Freshman Program become subject to these regulations one year after their initial registration. Students who exceed these limits must apply to the Faculty for permission to continue.

Students routinely taking 18 credits or fewer per year are not subject to the above requirements.

3.5 Program Requirements

3.5.1 Freshman Program

Students who need to complete 97-120 credits to complete their degree requirements must complete the Freshman program requirements in their first year of studies prior to selecting a departmental program. Students may select one of the following Freshman program options:

For further details, refer to the Arts and Science Freshman information on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/artscisao.

Note: A Freshman (U-0) Year 24-Credit Option "Making Modernities" is currently under consideration for September 2005.

Students will explore key texts, cultural artifacts, and performative arts that illustrate social, political, philosophical, and scientific creativity in comparative perspective. A series of four integrated, interdisciplinary 6-credit courses includes lectures, seminars, tutorials, and a performative module. Courses explore the Ancient World of Greece and China, the late Medieval World of Renaissance Italy and Islam, the Early Modern Enlightenment and New World, and the Modern World of Western and Eastern Europe and Developing countries in Africa and Asia.

3.5.2 Departmental Programs

Arts students, other than those registered in the Freshman Program, are required to have an approved program (Multi-track, Honours, Faculty), and to select their courses in each term with a view to timely completion of their degree and program requirements. Students must complete one of the following program streams:

MULTI-TRACK SYSTEM

To recognise the diversity of student backgrounds and interests and the multiple routes to understanding provided by a modern university, the Faculty of Arts offers a 90-credit multi-track system that includes a Major Concentration complemented by at least a Minor Concentration and that may be completed in one of the following ways:

Options

Regulations:

Definitions:

Units:

academic departments or administrative equivalents.

Programs:

lists of required and complementary courses (including prerequisites for required courses) prepared and maintained by units.

Major Concentration:

36 credits taken from a unit's Major program.

Minor Concentration:

18 credits taken from a unit's Minor program. Expandable Minor Concentrations are those which can, on the completion of 18 additional approved credits, be expanded into a Major Concentration within the appropriate unit.

HONOURS PROGRAM

Honours programs demand a high degree of specialisation, and require students to satisfy specific departmental and Faculty Honours requirements while maintaining a good academic standing. They are designed to prepare students for graduate study.

Regulations:

JOINT HONOURS PROGRAM

Students who wish to study at the Honours level in two disciplines can combine Joint Honours Program Components from any two Arts disciplines, see section 11.4 "Joint Honours Programs" for a list of available programs. Each Joint Honours component consists of a maximum of 36 required and complementary credits (not including program prerequisites). In cases where a minimum of 24 credits are in courses normally restricted to Honours students, the total of required and complementary credits may be as few as 30.

To complete a Joint Honours degree, a student must achieve a minimum CGPA of 3.00. The program GPA (the GPA of all required and complementary courses taken at McGill which constitute the Joint Honours program) must be a minimum of 3.00, although academic units may set higher requirements for their component of the program GPA.

FACULTY PROGRAM

A Faculty program is an approved selection of courses constituting a concentration in an intellectually coherent and inter-faculty field of studies. These courses must include approved selections from one of the following:

The Faculty of Arts currently recognises the following Faculty Programs:

3.6 Course Requirements

All required and complementary courses used to fulfil program requirements must be completed with a grade of C or better. Students who fail to obtain a satisfactory grade in a required course must either pass the supplemental examination in the course or do additional work for a supplemental grade if these options are available, or repeat the course. Course substitution will be allowed only in special cases; students should consult their academic adviser.

Normally, students are permitted to repeat a failed course only once. (Failure is considered to be a grade of less than C or the administrative failures of J and KF.) If a required course is failed a second time, a student may appeal to the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) for permission to take the course a third time. If permission is denied by the Associate Dean and/or by the Committee on Student Standing, on appeal, the student must withdraw from the program. If the failed course is a complementary course required by the program, a student may choose to replace it with another appropriate complementary course. If a student chooses to substitute another complementary course for a complementary course in which a D was received, credit for the first course will still be given, but as an elective. If a student repeats a required course in which a D was received, credit will be given only once.

Full details of the course requirements for all programs offered are given in each unit's section together with the locations of departmental advisory offices, program directors and telephone numbers should further information be required.

3.6.1 Course Overlap

Students will not receive credit towards their degree for any course that overlaps in content with a course passed at McGill, CEGEP, at another university, or Advanced Placement exams, Advanced Level results, International Baccalaureate Diploma, or French Baccalaureate. It is the student's responsibility to consult the Student Affairs Office or the department offering the course as to whether or not credit can be obtained and to be aware of exclusion clauses specified in the course description in the Calendar.

Credit for statistics courses

will be given with the following stipulations:

Credit for computer courses will be subject to the following restrictions:

3.6.2 Courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science

The following regulations apply to students in the Faculty of Arts who wish to take courses outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science:

Any courses taught at McGill University may be used towards the maximum allowed with the following exceptions:

3.6.3 Transfer Credit Policy for Courses Taken Outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science

Students who transfer from faculties outside the Faculties of Arts and of Science either at McGill or at another institution may transfer up to a maximum of 30 credits under the following conditions:

3.6.4 Courses Taken Under the Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory Option

Students may take one elective course per term that is graded under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option, to a maximum of 10% of their credits taken at McGill to fulfil their degree requirements. The decision to have an elective course graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory must be made by students before the end of the Drop/Add period. For more information and restrictions, please consult Courses Taken under the Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory (S/U) Option.

3.6.5 Courses in English as a Second Language

ESL courses are only open to students whose primary language is not English and who have studied for fewer than five years in English-language secondary institutions. Students in the Faculty of Arts may take a maximum of 12 credits, including academic writing courses for non-anglophones.

3.6.6 Auditing of Courses

No auditing of courses is allowed at McGill University.

4 Advising

Fall term academic advising for newly admitted students takes place during the week prior to the beginning of classes. Students newly admitted to the winter term should consult the Calendar of Dates for exact advising dates.

Students who need 96 or fewer credits to complete their degree requirements must consult an academic adviser in their proposed department of study to obtain advice and approval of their course selection. To facilitate program planning, they must present their transcripts and letters of admission. For a detailed description of advising and registration procedures, students should refer to Welcome to McGill, which they receive from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office upon their acceptance, as well as the Student Affairs Website, www.mcgill.ca/artscisao.

Students who need 97-120 credits to complete their degree requirements will normally be registered in a Freshman Program until they complete their first year. They must consult an adviser in the Student Affairs Office to obtain advice and approval of their course selection. For a detailed description of advising and registration procedures, Freshman students should refer to Welcome to McGill, which they receive upon acceptance from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office, as well as the Student Affairs Website, www.mcgill.ca/artscisao.

Academic advising for all returning students takes place in March for the coming academic year. For more information, students should refer to the Student Affairs Website, www.mcgill.ca/artscisao.

Advising is also available by e-mail. The address is adviser.artsci@mcgill.ca.

5 Registration

All students register by Minerva, McGill's Web-based registration system.

New students register in August prior to the first day of classes. For detailed information about registration, please refer to Registration, Welcome to McGill, the Student Affairs Website www.mcgill.ca/artscisao, and to the Minerva Website www.mcgill.ca/minerva.

Returning students register at the end of March, April and May for the coming academic year. For detailed information about registration, please refer to Registration, to the information on www.mcgill.ca/artscisao and to the Minerva Website, www.mcgill.ca/minerva.

Students who fall into unsatisfactory standing at the end of the academic year will have their registration cancelled. They may not reregister in the Faculty. However, students who can provide proof of extenuating circumstances that affected their academic performance may appeal to the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) for readmission. For more information, students should consult the Student Affairs Office, Dawson Hall, or the Student Affairs Website www.mcgill.ca/artscisao.

Students who have an outstanding fee balance from a previous term or outstanding fines will not be permitted to register. In addition, students who have registered for the upcoming academic year, but who subsequently take summer courses without paying the fees, will have their registration cancelled. Registration will be denied until these debts are paid in full. Students must pay all debts before the end of the registration period to be permitted to register. Students with financial problems should consult the Student Aid Office, Brown Student Services Building.

Students who decide not to return to McGill after initiating registration must withdraw from all of their courses on Minerva or inform the Student Affairs Office in writing. The deadline for withdrawal from the University is the same deadline as for a course withdrawal; see the Calendar of Dates. After the deadline, students may, under exceptional circumstances, be granted permission to withdraw from the University. Such students should contact the Student Affairs Office in Dawson Hall, for further information.

5.1 Program Registration

Students should refer to Welcome to McGill or to the Arts and Science Registration information on how to register for programs on the Student Affairs Website www.mcgill.ca/artscisao and to the Minerva Website, www.mcgill.ca/minerva. See section 11 "Programs in the Faculty" for a list of programs which can be taken by Arts students.

5.2 Course Registration

All courses have limited enrolment.

Students in the Faculty of Arts may register for and take for credit any course, unless otherwise indicated, in the sections of the Calendar applicable to the Faculties of Arts and of Science, subject to the course restrictions listed in this section.

Since the registration system is unable to verify whether or not Faculty regulations are respected, it is technically possible to register for courses that may not be credited towards the B.A. When students' records are manually verified, however, any courses taken that violate the Faculty regulations will be flagged after the end of course change period as "not for credit towards the B.A.". As a result, the students' expected date of graduation may be delayed.

Some courses may require special permission. Students should consult this Calendar and/or the Class Schedule well in advance of the Course Change period to determine if permission is required of the instructor, the department, or the Faculty for any course they wish to take.

Students who believe they have valid reasons to take a course that may not be credited towards the B.A. must obtain the permission of the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) of Arts.

5.2.1 Registration for First-Year Seminars

Registration for First-Year Seminars is limited to students in their first year of study at McGill, i.e., newly admitted students in U0 or U1. These courses are designed to provide a closer interaction with professors and better working relations with peers than is available in large introductory courses. These seminars endeavour to teach the latest scholarly developments and expose participants to advanced research methods. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. The maximum number of students in any seminar is 25, although some are limited to even fewer than that.

Students may take only one First-Year Seminar. Students who register for more than one will be obliged to withdraw from all but one of them. For a complete listing, please see section 12.1 "First Year Seminars".

The First-Year Seminars offered by the Faculty of Science are also open to Arts students. For a complete listing, please see "Registration for First-Year Seminars" .

5.2.2 Registration in Multi-Term Courses

Students who select a multi-term course are making a commitment to that course for its entirety. Students MUST register in the same section in all terms of a multi-term course. Credit will be jeopardized if students deliberately register in different sections of a multi-term course. In exceptional cases, when circumstances are beyond the student's control, the Student Affairs Office may grant permission to change section mid-way through a multi-term course. Students must make their request in writing to the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) citing their reason for the request. The request must also have the written support of the instructors of the sections involved and of the coordinator of the course (if appliciable).

5.3 Registration for Graduation

Students in their final year must indicate the expected date of graduation on Minerva and verify this date on verification forms and unofficial transcripts. When final-year students change their expected date of graduation, they must notify the Student Affairs Office immediately. Failure to do so may postpone graduation.

Students who complete their degree requirements at any time after their last registered term at McGill must apply to the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) to graduate. Application to graduate must be made sufficiently in advance of the expected graduation date to allow the Faculty to verify the student's record. For further information, students should contact the Student Affairs Office.

6 Grading and Credit

Before the end of the course change (drop/add) period, each instructor will inform students of the following:

6.1 Incomplete Grades

An instructor who believes that there is justification for a student to delay submitting term work may extend the deadline until after the end of the course. In this case, the instructor will submit a grade of "K" (incomplete), indicating the date by which the work is to be completed. The maximum extensions for the submission of grades to the Student Affairs Office are as follows:

Students' deadlines for submitting their work must be sufficiently in advance of these dates to ensure that the work can be graded and the mark submitted on time.

It is important to note that instructors may impose earlier deadlines than those listed above.

If marks to clear Ks have not been submitted to the Student Affairs Office by April 30 for fall courses, or July 30 for winter courses and courses spanning fall/winter, the K is automatically changed to a KF and counts as an F in the GPA.

Students with a grade of K who have serious extenuating circumstances may request an extension of the K deadline (KE) from the Associate Dean (Student Affairs).

Please see "Grading and Grade Point Averages (GPA)" for more information.

7 Examinations

Students should refer to Examinations for information about final examinations and deferred examinations.

The exam schedules are posted on the McGill Website, www.mcgill.ca and in the Student Affairs Office, Dawson Hall, Room 110, normally one month after the start of classes for Tentative Exam Schedules, and two months after the start of classes for Final Examination Schedules. Students should also refer to the Student Affairs Website at www.mcgill.ca/artscisao for more information.

8 Supplemental Assessments

8.1 Supplemental Examinations

Students who wish to write supplemental examinations for certain courses must apply to the Student Affairs Office for permission. The following conditions apply:

For courses in the Faculties of Arts and of Science, the supplemental examination period for fall courses is during the months of April and May, and for winter courses and courses spanning fall/winter during the last week of August. Supplemental applications are available at the Student Affairs Office. The deadline for submission of applications is March 1 for fall courses and July 15 for winter courses and courses spanning fall/winter. A non-refundable fee for each supplemental paper is payable at the time of application. Students who register for a supplemental examination and subsequently find themselves unprepared for it should not write it; except for the loss of the registration fee, there is no penalty for not writing a supplemental examination. Students should consult the Student Affairs Office for further information.

8.2 Additional Work

Instructors of courses that include graded written term work may choose to provide the option of additional work to eligible students. The following conditions apply:

Additional work applications are available in the Student Affairs Office. The deadline for submission of applications is March 1 for fall courses and July 15 for winter courses and courses spanning fall/winter. A non-refundable fee is payable for each course at the time of application. Students should consult the Student Affairs Office for further information.

8.3 Reassessments and Rereads

In accordance with the Charter of Student Rights, and subject to the conditions stated therein, students have the right to consult any written submission for which they have received a mark and the right to discuss this submission with the examiner.

The Faculty of Arts recognises two types of reassessments or rereads:

Reassessment of Course Work

These reassessments are administered and conducted solely by the units involved according to procedures specified by the units and made available to staff and students. Requests for such reassessments must be made within 10 working days of the date of return of the graded materials. The reviewer will assess the fairness of the original grade rather than re-mark the assignment as he or she would have graded it. Reassessments should normally be completed within 20 working days of the request. Grades may be lowered or raised, or they may remain the same, as a result of the reassessment. The grade obtained on the reassessment takes precedence over the original grade.

Rereads of Final Exams

These rereads are administered by the Student Affairs Office, but conducted by the units involved. Students must apply in writing to the Student Affairs Office by March 31 for courses in the Fall term and by September 30 for courses in the Winter or Summer terms (these deadlines are strictly enforced and no requests will be accepted past them). Students are assessed a fee of $35.00 for such rereads. It is strongly recommended, but not required, that students consult with the instructor of the course before requesting a reread of a final exam. The reviewer will assess the fairness of the original grade rather than re-mark the assignment as he or she would have graded it. Grades may be lowered or raised, or they may remain the same, as a result of the reread. The grade obtained on the reread takes precedence over the original grade.

Reassessments and rereads in courses not in the Faculty of Arts or of Science are subject to the deadlines, rules, and regulations of the relevant faculty.

9 Academic Standing

Academic standing is based primarily on students' cumulative grade point average (CGPA), but may also be affected by their term grade point average (TGPA). Academic standing is assessed in January for the fall term, in May for the winter term, and in September for the summer term. Academic standing in each term determines if students will be allowed to continue their studies in the next term and if any conditions will be attached to their registration.

Decisions about academic standing in the fall term are based only on grades that are available in January. Grades for courses in which students have deferred examinations and fall-term grades for courses that span the fall and winter terms do not affect academic standing for the fall term, even though they will ultimately affect students' fall TGPA. Therefore, academic standings for the fall term that are designated as "interim" should be interpreted as advisory. Note that interim standing will not appear on external transcripts. Interim standing decisions are mentioned below only if the rules for them differ from those for regular standing decisions.

Satisfactory/Interim Satisfactory Standing

Students in satisfactory standing may continue in their program.

Probationary/Interim Probationary Standing

Students in probationary standing may continue in their program, but must carry a reduced load (maximum 14 credits per term) and raise their TGPA and CGPA to return to satisfactory standing (see above). They should see their departmental adviser to discuss their course selection.

Students in interim probationary standing may continue in their program, but should evaluate their course load and reduce it as appropriate. They are strongly advised to consult a departmental adviser, before the withdrawal deadlines, about their course selection for the winter term.

Unsatisfactory Readmitted Standing

Students who were previously in unsatisfactory standing and who were readmitted to the Faculty by the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) or the Committee on Student Standing will have their standing changed to unsatisfactory readmitted standing. Their course load is specified in their letter of readmission as are the conditions they must meet to be allowed to continue in their program. They should see their departmental adviser to discuss their course selection.

Unsatisfactory/Interim Unsatisfactory Standing

Students in interim unsatisfactory standing may continue in their program, but should evaluate their course load and reduce it as appropriate. They are strongly advised to consult a departmental adviser, before the withdrawal deadlines, about their course selection for the winter term.

Students in unsatisfactory standing have failed to meet the minimum standards set by the Faculty. They may not continue in their program, and their registration will be cancelled.

Appeals for readmission by students in unsatisfactory standing should be addressed to the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) no later than July 15 for readmission to the fall term and November 15 for the winter term. Readmission will be considered only when proof of extenuating circumstances that affected academic performance can be provided (e.g., medical or other documentation). Students in unsatisfactory standing for the second time must withdraw permanently.

Normally supplemental examinations are not permitted; however, students in unsatisfactory standing may appeal to the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) for permission to write a supplemental examination, clearly stating the reasons for special consideration and providing proof as appropriate.

Incomplete Standings

Standing awaits deferred exam.
Must clear K's, L's or Supplementals.
Standing Incomplete.

Students with incomplete standings in the winter or summer term may register for the fall term, but their standing must be resolved by the end of the course-change period for that term. Students whose incomplete standing changes to satisfactory, probationary, or interim unsatisfactory standing may continue in the program. Students whose standing changes to unsatisfactory standing may not continue in their program, and their registration will be cancelled.

Students whose standing changes to unsatisfactory and who wish to ask for permission to continue in their program must make a request to the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) as soon as they are placed in unsatisfactory standing. Readmission will be considered only when proof of extenuating circumstances that affected academic performance can be provided (e.g., medical or other documentation).

Students whose standing is still incomplete by the end of course change period should immediately consult with the Student Affairs Office.

At the end of the winter term, students with a mark of K or L will be placed in the appropriate standing in June, if the outstanding mark in the course will not affect their result. Otherwise the standing decision will only be made once their incomplete marks have been cleared. For more information about incomplete grades please refer to Incomplete Grades.

10 Awards and Honourary Designations

10.1 Honours and First-Class Honours

Departments may recommend to the Faculty that graduating students registered in an Honours program be awarded Honours or First-Class Honours under the following conditions:

Students in an Honours program whose program GPA or CGPA is below 3.00 or who did not satisfy certain additional program requirements must consult their adviser to determine if they are eligible to graduate in a program other than Honours.

10.2 Distinction and Great Distinction

Students in the Faculty or the Multi-track programs whose academic performance is appropriate may be awarded their degrees with Distinction or Great Distinction under the following conditions:

10.3 Dean's Honour List

The designation Dean's Honour List may be awarded to a graduating student under the following conditions:

The designation Dean's Honour List may be awarded at the end of each academic year to continuing students under the following conditions:

10.4 Medals and Prizes

Various medals, scholarships, and prizes are open to continuing and graduating students. Full details of these are set out in the Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards Calendar, available from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office or on the Web www.mcgill.ca. No application is required except in the case of the Moyse Travelling Scholarships.

11 Programs in the Faculty

11.1 Major Concentrations

African Studies
Anthropology
Art History
Canadian Studies
Classics
Computing, Foundations of
[application required, see unit entry for information]
Contemporary German Studies
East Asian Studies
Economics
English - Literature
English - Drama and Theatre
English - Cultural Studies
Langue et littérature françaises - Lettres
Langue et littérature françaises - Lettres et traduction
Langue et littérature françaises - Linguistiqe du français
Geography
Geography (Urban Systems)
German Language and Literature
German Literature and Culture
Hispanic Literature and Culture
Hispanic Languages
History
Humanistic Studies
International Development Studies
Italian Language and Literature
Italian Civilization
Jewish Studies
Latin-American Studies
Linguistics
Mathematics
Middle East Studies
Music
North American Studies
Philosophy
Philosophy and Western Religions - new
Political Science
Psychology
Québec Studies
Russian
Scriptures and Interpretations [see Religious Studies]
Sociology
Women's Studies
World Religions [see Religious Studies]

11.2 Faculty Programs

Industrial Relations
Environment [see McGill School of Environment]

11.3 Honours Programs

Anthropology
Art History
Canadian Studies - new
Classics
East Asian Studies
Economics
English (Literature)
English (Drama and Theatre)
English (Cultural Studies)
Langue et littérature françaises - Lettres
Langue et littérature françaises - Lettres et traduction
Geography
German Studies
Hispanic Studies
History
International Development Studies
Italian Studies (Literature)
Jewish Studies
Latin American and Caribbean Studies - Area
Latin American and Caribbean Studies - Thematic
Linguistics
Mathematics
Middle East Studies
Philosophy
Philosophy and Western Religions - new
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies - Asian Religions
Religious Studies - Western Religions
Russian
Sociology
Women's Studies

11.4 Joint Honours Programs

There are two types of Joint Honours Programs available in the Faculty of Arts:

11.5 Minor Concentrations

African Studies
Socio-Cultural Anthropology - see Anthropology
Anthropological Archaeology - see Anthropology
Art History
Behavioural Science [see Psychology]
Canadian Ethnic Studies
Canadian Studies
Catholic Studies
Classics
Computer Science
[application required, see unit entry for information]
East Asian Language and Literature
East Asian Cultural Studies
Advanced East Asian Studies
Economics
Educational Psychology
Education for Arts Students
English - Literature
English - Drama and Theatre
English - Cultural Studies
Foundations of Computing [see Computer Science]
Langue et littérature françaises - Langue française
Langue et littérature françaises - Lettres
Langue et littérature françaises - Lettres et traduction
Langue et littérature françaises - Langue et traduction
Langue et littérature françaises - Théorie et critique littérraires
Geographical Information Systems
Geography
Geography (Urban Systems)
German Language
German Literature
German Literature and Culture in Translation
Hispanic Languages
Hispanic Literature
History
History and Philosophy of Science
Humanistic Studies
International Development Studies
Italian Language and Literature
Italian Civilization
Jewish Studies
Jewish Law
Theoretical Linguistics
Applied Linguistics
Mathematics
Statistics [see Mathematics and Statistics]
Middle East Studies
Middle East Languages
Music
Music Technology
North American Studies
Philosophy
Philosophy and Western Religions -new
Political Science
Political Science: Canada/Québec
Comparative Politics [see Political Science]
International Relations [see Political Science]
Political Economy [see Political Science]
Politics, Law and Society [see Political Science]
South Asia [see Political Science]
Psychology
Behavioural Science [see Psychology]
Québec Studies
Russian
Russian Civilization
Science for Arts Students
Scriptural Languages [see Religious Studies]
Social Studies of Medicine
Sociology
Women's Studies
World Religions [see Religious Studies]

12 Academic Programs

12.1 First Year Seminars

See Course section for descriptions.

ECON 199
FYS: The Role of Government
ENGL 199
FYS: Literature and Democracy
FREN 199
FYS: Littérature française
GEOG 199
FYS: Geo-Environments
GERM 197
FYS: Images of Otherness
ITAL 199
FYS: Italy's Literature in Context
JWST 199
FYS: Images - Jewish Identities
SWRK 199
FYS: Social Work Profession

12.2 General Faculty Courses

12.2.1 Arts Educational Technology (ARET)

The Faculty of Arts Computer Services (FACS) offers an elementary computing course, ARET 150 (1 credit).

FACS also operates the Faculty of Arts Computer Laboratory which offers a wide range of services to the Faculty. The labs provide access to the internet, the library catalogue and Canadian Census data, and some other electronic data stored in various locations on campus. The Teaching Lab provides a venue for training in specialized graphic and statistical software, and for other course-related computerized teaching tools. Standard word-processing, statistical and spread-sheet software is available, as well as specialized desk-top publishing software. Laser printing, scanning and colour-printing are available for nominal fees.

NB:

ARET 150 is not open to Science, Management or Engineering students, or to Arts students registered in Computer Science programs, or in Mathematics and Computer Science programs. Credit will not be given for ARET 150 if taken concurrently with or after COMP 100, COMP 102, COMP 202, COMP 203, COMP 208, COMP 250, EDPT 200 or MGCR 331.

12.3 Faculty of Arts Internship Program

Several departments in the Faculty of Arts offer undergraduate students the opportunity to earn university credit while gaining experience in areas relevant to their fields of study. Open to U2 and U3 students, normally after completing 30 credits of a 90 credit program or 45 credits of a 96-120 credit program, normally with a minimum CGPA of 2.7, and permission of the departmental Internship Advisor. Arts internships involve a minimum of 150 hours of work with an approved host institution or organization. Students are required to submit a major topical paper that discusses an aspect of the internship from academic perspective.

For more information about the Faculty of Arts Internship Program: www.mcgill.ca/arts-internships.

12.4 African Studies Program (AFRI)

General Inquiries:
Peterson Hall, Room 318
3460 McTavish Street
Montreal, QC  H3A 1X9 
Telephone: (514) 398-4301
E-mail: faye.scrim@mcgill.ca
Website: www.mcgill.ca/africanstudies 
Program Coordinator
M. Echenberg (History)
Program Committee:
K. Fallon (Sociology), J. Galaty (Anthropology), J. Jorgensen (Faculty of Management), S. McCall (Philosophy), T. Meredith (Geography)
MINOR CONCENTRATION IN AFRICAN STUDIES
(Expandable) (18 credits)

A Minor Concentration in African Studies is available for those students majoring in a discipline of the Faculty of Arts who wish to acquire interdisciplinary knowledge of Africa.

Required Course
(3 credits)
AFRI 598
Research Seminar in African Studies
Complementary Courses
(15 credits)
To be selected from the courses listed below. Priority should be given to key African courses, designated with an asterisk (*), whenever they are offered.
MAJOR CONCENTRATION IN AFRICAN STUDIES
(36 credits)

The Major Concentration in African Studies provides students with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the African continent.

Students wishing to major in African Studies should consult the Program Coordinator at the beginning of their first academic year. In the African Studies Major Concentration, students will be encouraged to identify an area within a discipline of the Faculty, taking as many relevant courses as possible in that field.

Required Course
(3 credits)
AFRI 598
Research Seminar in African Studies
Complementary Courses
(33 credits)
To be selected from the courses listed below. Priority should be given to key African courses, designated with an asterisk (*), whenever they are offered.

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE LIST

These courses are either on African subjects or have significant African content.

If courses listed below are not available in any particular year, modifications to the Programs may be made with the approval of the Program Coordinator.

Students who wish program credit for other courses with African content, or in which they have pursued individual research or written papers on African topics, should seek approval from the Program Coordinator. African content may be found in certain courses offered in Islamic Studies and Religious Studies.

African Studies
AFRI 480
Special Topics
AFRI 481
Special Topics
Anthropology
ANTH 212
Anthropology of Development
ANTH 301
Nomadic Pastoralists
ANTH 321*
People and Cultures of Africa
ANTH 322*
Social Change in Modern Africa
ANTH 335
Ancient Egyptian Civilization
ANTH 345
Prehistory of Africa
ANTH 412
Topics: Anthropological Theory
ANTH 415
Problems in African Anthropology
ANTH 439
Theories of Development
ANTH 445
Property and Land Tenure
Economics
ECON 208
Microeconomic Analysis and Applications
ECON 313
Economic Development 1
ECON 416
Topics in Economic Development 2
English
ENGL 352
Current Topics in Criticism and Critical Theory
ENGL 421*
African Literature
French
 
FREN 312
Francophonie 2
Geography
GEOG 216
Geography of the World Economy
GEOG 408
Geography of Development
GEOG 410
Geography of Underdevelopment: Current Problems
History
 
HIST 200*
Introduction to African History
HIST 201*
Modern African History
HIST 374
West Africa Since 1800
HIST 381
Colonial Africa: Health/Disease
HIST 382
History of South Africa
HIST 396
Disease in Africa Since 1960
HIST 444
British Colonies: Africa and Asia
HIST 486D1
Topics: African Social History
HIST 486D2
Topics: African Social History
Islamic Studies
ISLA 410
History: Middle-East 1798-1918
ISLA 521D1
Introductory Arabic
ISLA 521D2
Introductory Arabic
Political Science
POLI 227
Developing Areas/Introduction
POLI 300D1
Developing Areas/Revolution
POLI 300D2
Developing Areas/Revolution
POLI 471
Democracy in the Modern World
POLI 472
Developing Areas/Social Movements
POLI 522
Seminar: Developing Areas
Sociology
SOCI 370
Sociology: Gender & Development
SOCI 484
Emerging Democratic States
SOCI 550
Developing Societies

African Field Study Semester, under the Department of Geography, Faculty of Science, for details of the 15-credit interdisciplinary AFSS. Note: The AFSS will only be offered in 2004-05 pending approval by the Dean of Science.

12.5 Anthropology (ANTH)

Stephen Leacock Building, Room 717
855 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2T7 
Telephone: (514) 398-4300
Fax: (514) 398-7476
Website: www.arts.mcgill.ca/programs/anthro 
Chair
Michael S. Bisson
Professors
Donald W. Attwood; B.A.(Calif.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Margaret Lock; B.Sc.(Leeds), M.A., Ph.D.(Calif.), F.R.S.C. (joint appoint. with Social Studies of Medicine) (on leave Jan.- Dec. 2005)
Jérôme Rousseau; B.Sc., M.A.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Cantab.)
Philip Carl Salzman; B.A.(Antioch), M.A., Ph.D.(Chic.) (on leave 2004-2005)
Bruce G. Trigger; B.A.(Tor.), Ph.D.(Yale), F.R.S.C. (James McGill Professor) (on leave Jan.-Dec. 2004)
Allan Young; B.A.(Penn.), M.A.(Wash.), Ph.D.(Penn.) (joint appoint. with Social Studies of Medicine)
Associate Professors
Michael S. Bisson; B.A., Ph.D.(Calif.)
Laurel Bossen; B.A.(Barnard), M.A., Ph.D.(SUNY, Albany)
Ellen Corin; Ph.D.(Louvain) (joint appoint. with Psychiatry)
John G. Galaty; B.A.(Hartford), M.A., Ph.D.(Chic.)
Carmen Lambert; B.A.(Montr.), M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Kristin Norget; B.A.(U.Vic.), M.Phil., D.Phil.(Cantab.)
James M. Savelle; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Ott.), M.A.(Ark.), Ph.D.(Alta.)
Colin H. Scott; B.A.(Regina), M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Assistant Professors
André Costopoulos; B.A. (McGill), M.A. (U. Montréal), Ph.D. (Oulu)
Nicole C. Couture; B.A. (Trent), M.A., Ph.D. (Chicago)
Sandra T. Hyde; B.A.(UC Santa Cruz), M.P.H.(Hawaii), Ph.D.(UC Berkeley)
Rebecca Hardin; B.A.(Brown), M.Phil., Ph.D.(Yale)
Associate Member
Vinh-Kim Nguyen; B.Sc. (McG.), M.D. (Mont.), M.A., Ph.D. (McG.)

The Honours Program and Major Concentration in Anthropology emphasize the similarity and diversity of human behaviour, understanding of social and cultural systems, and the processes of socio-cultural change from human origins to the present day. Within Anthropology, the Department concentrates on the fields of Archaeology and Socio-Cultural Anthropology.

Our programs serve as a useful background for those who are planning a career in law, foreign service, community organization, public administration, journalism, and teaching and research in social sciences and humanities. The Multi-track Major and Minor Concentration provide students with a solid grounding in anthropology as a whole, or in selected topical or sub-disciplinary areas, while allowing students to follow programs in other departments that suit their needs and interests. The Honours program provides a greater focus on Anthropology with substantial breadth and depth. The completion of an Honours program is frequently required for admission into graduate or professional schools.

Students should have a CGPA of at least 3.00 to register in an Honours or Joint Honours Program after their first year, and to graduate with an Honours Degree. Graduation with a First Class Honours or Joint Honours Degree requires a CGPA of 3.50 or better.

CORE COURSES

Core courses in Anthropology (350 level) provide students with essential knowledge of method and theory. They are more intensive than other 300-level courses, and are restricted to Anthropology program students in U-2 standing or above.

ANTHROPOLOGY MINOR CONCENTRATIONS

A Minor Concentration in Anthropology consists of 18 credits (six 3-credit courses) in the discipline. The two Minor Concentrations currently offered are designed to complement students' study in related disciplines or in interdisciplinary programs. The degree may enhance the employment profile of graduating students wishing to work in social services, in multicultural or multiethnic settings, in international development, aboriginal history, museum work, or in educational or media related professions. The Department offers a Minor Concentration in Socio-Cultural Anthropology providing a broad-based exposure to the discipline and the maximum flexibility in the choice of courses. There is also a sub-disciplinary Minor Concentration in Anthropological Archaeology.

Students should register in the Minor Concentration prior to their second year of study at McGill. No credits taken in a Minor may overlap with another degree program. These Minor Concentrations may be expanded into the single Anthropology Major Concentration.

MINOR CONCENTRATION IN SOCIO-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
(Expandable) (18 credits)

[Program revisions are under consideration for September 2004. Go to www.mcgill.ca (Course Calendars) in July for details.]

The Minor Concentration in Socio-Cultural Anthropology permits students to take courses from all theoretical perspectives and areas offered by the Department. Students must take the following profile of courses to fulfil the requirements for this Minor Concentration.

Complementary Courses
(18 credits)
6 credits, two 200-level courses selected from:
ANTH 202
(3)
Comparative Cultures
ANTH 203
(3)
Human Evolution
ANTH 204
(3)
Symbol Systems and Ideologies
ANTH 205
(3)
Cultures of the World
ANTH 206
(3)
Environment and Culture
ANTH 207
(3)
Ethnography through Film
ANTH 209
(3)
Anthropology of Religion
ANTH 212
(3)
Anthropology of Development
ANTH 214
(3)
Violence, Warfare, Culture
ANTH 227
(3)
Medical Anthropology
3 credits, one Area course selected from:
ANTH 306
(3)
Native Peoples' History in Canada
ANTH 321
(3)
People and Cultures of Africa
ANTH 322
(3)
Social Change in Modern Africa
ANTH 326
(3)
Peoples of Central and South America
ANTH 327
(3)
Peoples of South Asia
ANTH 328
(3)
Peoples and Cultures of South-East Asia
ANTH 329
(3)
Modern Chinese Society and Change
ANTH 332
(3)
Peoples of Oceania
ANTH 337
(3)
Mediterranean Society and Culture
ANTH 338
(3)
Native Peoples of North America
ANTH 340
(3)
Middle Eastern Society and Culture
ANTH 415
(3)
Problems in African Anthropology
ANTH 427
(3)
Social Change in South Asia
ANTH 436
(3)
North American Native Peoples
9 credits of additional Anthropology courses of which no more than 3 credits may be at the 200 level.
MINOR CONCENTRATION IN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ARCHAEOLOGY
(Expandable) (18 credits)

[Program revisions are under consideration for September 2004. Go to www.mcgill.ca (Course Calendars) in July for details.]

The Minor Concentration in Anthropological Archaeology focuses on archaeological theory and methods, and the evolution of human behaviour. It will complement students' programs in History, Art History, Classics, Geology, or Biology.

Required Course
(3 credits)
ANTH 201
(3)
Prehistoric Archaeology
Complementary Courses
(15 credits)
3 credits, one Area course selected from:
ANTH 317
(3)
Prehistory of North America
ANTH 331
(3)
Prehistory of East Asia
ANTH 335
(3)
Ancient Egyptian Civilization
ANTH 345
(3)
Prehistory of Africa
ANTH 347
(3)
Paleolithic Cultures
ANTH 348
(3)
Early Prehistory: New World
12 credits, selected from:
ANTH 203
(3)
Human Evolution
ANTH 313
(3)
Early Civilizations
ANTH 317
(3)
Prehistory of North America
ANTH 331
(3)
Prehistory of East Asia
ANTH 335
(3)
Ancient Egyptian Civilization
ANTH 345
(3)
Prehistory of Africa
ANTH 347
(3)
Paleolithic Cultures
ANTH 348
(3)
Early Prehistory: New World
ANTH 359
(3)
History of Archaeological Theory
ANTH 403
(3)
Current Issues in Archaeology
ANTH 413
(3)
Gender in Archaeology
ANTH 417
(3)
Ethnoarchaeology
ANTH 419
(3)
Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers
ANTH 420
(3)
Lithic Technology and Analysis
ANTH 431
(3)
Problems in East Asian Archaeology

MAJOR CONCENTRATION

The Major Concentration is especially appropriate for students who aim to take courses across several sub-disciplinary or topical concentrations, and for whom specialization is premature. There are no prerequisites for admission to the Major Concentration in Anthropology. Students are encouraged to take a course in quantitative methods (listed under the Honours program below), but this course cannot count as part of this Concentration.

MAJOR CONCENTRATION IN ANTHROPOLOGY
(36 credits)
[Addition to course lists under consideration for September 2004. Go to www.mcgill.ca (Course Calendars) in July for details.]
Complementary Courses
(36 credits)
6 credits selected from the 200-level courses in Anthropology
6 credits, two Core courses (350-level) selected from:
ANTH 352
(3)
History of Anthropological Theory
ANTH 355
(3)
Theories of Culture and Society
ANTH 357
(3)
Archaeological Methods
ANTH 358
(3)
The Process of Anthropological Research
ANTH 359
(3)
History of Archaeological Theory
6 credits, two Area courses selected from:
Ethnography
 
ANTH 306
(3)
Native Peoples' History in Canada
ANTH 321
(3)
People and Cultures of Africa
ANTH 322
(3)
Social Change in Modern Africa
ANTH 326
(3)
Peoples of Central and South America
ANTH 327
(3)
Peoples of South Asia
ANTH 328
(3)
Peoples and Cultures of South-East Asia
ANTH 329
(3)
Modern Chinese Society and Change
ANTH 332
(3)
Peoples of Oceania
ANTH 337
(3)
Mediterranean Society and Culture
ANTH 338
(3)
Native Peoples of North America
ANTH 340
(3)
Middle Eastern Society and Culture
ANTH 415
(3)
Problems in African Anthropology
ANTH 427
(3)
Social Change in South Asia
ANTH 436
(3)
North American Native Peoples
Archaeology
 
ANTH 317
(3)
Prehistory of North America
ANTH 331
(3)
Prehistory of East Asia
ANTH 335
(3)
Ancient Egyptian Civilization
ANTH 345
(3)
Prehistory of Africa
ANTH 347
(3)
Paleolithic Cultures
ANTH 348
(3)
Early Prehistory: New World
ANTH 552
(3)
Problems: Prehistory North Eastern America
6 credits, two 400-level Anthropology courses
12 credits of additional Anthropology courses of which no more than 6 credits may be at the 200 level
HONOURS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
(60 credits)
Minimum number of credits (unless otherwise stated)
The course selection for the program must satisfy the following requirements:
300- and 400-level courses in other departments (subject to departmental approval)
max. 9
200-level courses
max. 21
Core courses (350-level)
9
400-level courses in Anthropology
9
Honours thesis
6

Nine of the 60 credits of the Honours program can be courses at the 300 level or above given by other departments, if they are directly related to the student's focus of study within Anthropology and are approved by the student's adviser on the Undergraduate Committee of the Anthropology Department.

The following guidelines represent a program recommended, though not required, for Honours students. It is recommended that students gain a comprehensive background in anthropological methods and theory by taking one history of theory course (ANTH 352 or ANTH 359), two courses dealing with social and cultural theory (ANTH 308, ANTH 314, ANTH 320, ANTH 324, ANTH 333, ANTH 355 or ANTH 412), one course in anthropological research (ANTH 358), one course in research methods (ANTH 357 or ANTH 461) and one course in quantitative methods (SOCI 350, PSYC 204, ECON 317, GEOG 202, or MATH 203) for credit as an Anthropology course. In order to acquire a desirable regional background, students are encouraged to take two area courses, ideally pertaining to two distinct geographical concentrations.

Each student has the opportunity to construct within the Honours program a concentration focused on a particular field of interest, such as prehistory and evolution, cultural systems, social and political organization, or on a particular geographical area, such as Africa, North America, Central and South America, Mediterranean, Middle East, South, East or Southeast Asia. A single paper may be submitted for two courses at the 300-level or above, provided that prior written permission has been received from the professors teaching both courses. It is expected that such papers would be more substantial than one submitted for either course.

In the first year of the program, students should take introductory courses from a range of topics available at the 200-level. Some 300-level courses may also be taken. The objective of the first year is the development of a grasp of the anthropological discipline, and an exposure to a broad selection of topics.

In the second year of the program, students should acquire knowledge of anthropological theories and methods, primarily by taking core courses and other relevant offerings. They should also begin to consider a substantive topic and geographical region of specialization.

The third year of the program should advance the process of specialization within the discipline, through 400-level seminars and preparing an Honours Thesis, based on independent research. Permission of an adviser is necessary in order to register for an Honours Thesis in the fall, so students should approach staff before that time to discuss possible topics and gain approval. The required thesis must be a six-credit course. It may be completed in a single term (ANTH 490 or ANTH 491) or in two consecutive terms (ANTH 492D1/ANTH 492D2).

According to Faculty regulations, Honours students must maintain a minimum CGPA of 3.00 and maintain a minimum program GPA of 3.00.

JOINT HONOURS - ANTHROPOLOGY COMPONENT
(36 credits)
Minimum number of credits (unless otherwise stated)
Joint Honours program (Anthropology portion)
36
Courses above 200-level, Anthropology portion
24
Core courses in Anthropology (350-level)
9
400-level courses in Anthropology
6
Honours thesis
6
(of which 3 credits are normally in
the other Joint Honours Program)

Students interested in Joint Honours should consult an adviser in the other department for specific course requirements. A form will be supplied by the Anthropology Department to keep track of courses required by both departments for the program selected.

Students who wish to study at the Honours level in two disciplines can combine Joint Honours Program components from any two Arts disciplines, see section 11.4 "Joint Honours Programs" for a list of available programs.

Joint Honours students should consult an adviser in each department to discuss their course selection and their interdisciplinary research project (if applicable).

For the Honours project, students register for a 3 credit "Special Topic" course (e.g., ANTH 480, ANTH 481, ANTH 482, ANTH 483, ANTH 484, or ANTH 485) in Anthropology, and a similar course ("Honours Thesis" or "Special Topic") in the other department. For information on the requirements for the other discipline making up the Joint Honours program, consult the department concerned.

For more information on these programs, consult an appropriate adviser on the Undergraduate Committee of the Department, through the Department Office at (514) 398-4300.

According to Faculty regulations, Joint Honours students must maintain a minimum CGPA of 3.00 and maintain a minimum program GPA of 3.00.

African Field Study Semester, under the Department of Geography, Faculty of Science, for details of the 15-credit interdisciplinary AFSS. Note: The AFSS will only be offered in 2004-05 pending approval by the Dean of Science.

12.6 Art History and Communication Studies
(ARTH and ENGC)

Arts Building, W-225 (West Wing, top floor)
853 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2T6 
Telephone: (514) 398-6541
Fax: (514) 398-7247
Website: www.arts.mcgill.ca/programs/AHCS 
Chair, Director of Graduate Programs in Communication Studies
Will Straw (on leave Sept. 2004 - Aug. 2005)
Director of Graduate Programs in Art History
Christine Ross
Emeritus Professors
John M. Fossey; B.A.(Birm.), D.U.(Lyon II), F.S.A., R.P.A.
George Szanto; B.A.(Dart.), Ph.D.(Harv.)
Professor
Hans J. Böker; Ph.D.(Saarbrücken), Dr.-Ing. habil (Hannover)
Associate Professors
David Crowley; B.A.(Johns H.), M.Sc.(Penns.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Christine Ross; M.A.(C'dia), Ph.D.(Paris I)
Will Straw; B.A.(Car.), M.A. Ph.D.(McG.)(on leave Sept. 2004 - Aug. 2005)
Assistant Professors
Jennifer Burman; B.A. (C'dia), M.A., Ph.D. (York)
Ting Chang; B.A.(McG.), M.A.(Tor.), Ph.D.(Sussex)
Charmaine Nelson; B.F.A., M.A. (C'dia), Ph.D. (Manchester)
Angela Vanhaelen; B.A. (Western), M.A., Ph.D. (U.B.C.)
Bronwen Wilson; B.A. ,M.A.(U.B.C.), Ph.D.(Northwestern)
Adjunct Professors
David W. Booth; B.A., M.A., M.Phil, Ph.D.(Tor.)
Johanne Lamoureux; B.A., M.A.(Montr.), Ph.D.(E.H.E.S.S., Paris)
Louis De Moura Sobral; M.A., Ph.D.(Louvain)
Constance Naubert-Riser; B.A., M.A.(Ott.), Ph.D.(Lyon III)

In the field of Art History the Department offers comprehensive programs of courses and seminars on the history of the visual arts, material culture, and architecture from antiquity to the present, focusing primarily on Europe and North America. The works of art and architecture are discussed within their cultural, political, historical, religious, philosophical and social context.

Major and Minor Concentrations, and Honours, Joint Honours and graduate programs are available in Art History. For the most up-to-date information on Department requirements and detailed course descriptions, please visit our Department's website or consult an appropriate Undergraduate advisor through the Departmental Office, Arts Building, Room W-225, (514) 398-6541.

The Department offers two introductory undergraduate courses in the Communication Studies area, as well as programs at the graduate level as described in the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar.

Orientation Session for New Students

All new students entering the Art History undergraduate programs are required to attend an information session prior to registration. In 2004, this session will be held on Wednesday, August 25 at 13:30 hours in Arts W-220.

At the meeting, the Academic Adviser will explain the requirements of the Department's programs. Incoming students will have an opportunity to ask questions and receive advice on how to plan their courses. Afterwards students will meet individually with an adviser in order to fill out their Minerva Course Selection Form for registration. Students should sign up for advising appointments after the orientation session.

MINOR CONCENTRATION IN ART HISTORY
(Expandable)
(18 credits)
--------------------------------START OF REVISION----------------

There are no pre-university requirements for this program.

Required Courses
(6 credits)
ARTH 208
(3)
Introductory Seminar in Art History
ARTH 305
(3)
Methods in Art History
Complementary Courses
(12 credits)
3 credits in Art History at the 200 level
9 credits in Art History at the 300 and 400 levels, selected in consultation with the departmental adviser.
Note: courses in studio practice cannot be counted towards the Minor Concentration.
--------------------------------END OF REVISION------------------------
MAJOR CONCENTRATION IN ART HISTORY
(36 credits)

There are no pre-university requirements for this program.

--------------------------------START OF REVISION----------------
Required Courses
(6 credits)
ARTH 208
(3)
Introductory Seminar in Art History
ARTH 305
(3)
Methods in Art History
Complementary Courses
(30 credits)
maximum of 6 credits in Art History at the 200 level, and
at least 24 credits in Art History at the 300 and 400 levels to be chosen in the following manner:
minimum 3 credits in Architectural History (II)
minimum 3 credits in Medieval & Renaissance Art (III)
minimum 3 credits in Baroque to 19th Century European Art (IV)
minimum 3 credits in Contemporary Art, Media and Visual Culture (V)
The remaining 12 credits can be chosen from any of Art History course fields: Methodologies (I), Architectural History (II), Medieval and Renaissance Art (III), Baroque to 19th Century European Art (IV), Contemporary Art, Media and Visual Culture (V).
(Note: courses in studio practice cannot be counted towards the Major Concentration.)
--------------------------------END OF REVISION------------------------
HONOURS IN ART HISTORY
(60 credits)

There are no pre-university requirements for this program.

Students are encouraged to apply for this program after their first year of study at the University and after completion of no less than 12 credits in Art History. Admission is on a competitive basis, since the Department can only accommodate a limited number of students in any given year.

--------------------------------START OF REVISION----------------

To qualify for the Honours degree, the student must complete the following 60 credits:

Required Courses
(9 credits)
ARTH 208
(3)
Introductory Seminar in Art History
ARTH 305
(3)
Methods in Art History
ARTH 400
(3)
Selected Methods in Art History
Complementary Courses
(51 credits)
36 credits in Art History courses (ensuring that a wide range of courses are taken)
9 credits in Art History at the 400 level.
6 credits in a foreign language or in courses in one or two related disciplines and selected in consultation with the Honours adviser.
--------------------------------END OF REVISION------------------------
JOINT HONOURS - ART HISTORY COMPONENT
(36 credits)

There are no pre-university requirements for this program.

Qualified students may submit proposals for Joint Honours in Art History and other related subjects to the Chairs of the departments concerned.

--------------------------------START OF REVISION----------------
Required Courses
(6 credits)
ARTH 208
(3)
Introductory Seminar in Art History
ARTH 305
(3)
Methods in Art History
Complementary Courses
(30 credits)
24 credits in Art History to be chosen in the following manner:
minimum 3 credits in Architectural History (II)
minimum 3 credits in Medieval & Renaissance Art (III)
minimum 3 credits in Baroque to 19th Century European Art (IV)
minimum 3 credits in Contemporary Art, Media and Visual Culture (V)
6 credits in Art History at the 400 level
Note: courses in studio practice cannot be counted towards the Joint Honours requirements.
--------------------------------END OF REVISION--------------------------------

Joint Honours students must maintain a GPA of 3.30 in their program courses and, according to Faculty regulations, a minimum CGPA of 3.00 in general.

Students who wish to study at the Honours level in two disciplines can combine Joint Honours Program components from any two Arts disciplines, see section 11.4 "Joint Honours Programs" for a list of available programs.

Joint Honours students should consult an adviser in each department to discuss their course selection and their research project (if applicable).

ART HISTORY COURSE FIELDS

Art History courses are divided into five fields:
I  Methodologies
II  Architectural History
III  Medieval and Renaissance Art
IV  Baroque to 19th Century European Art
V  Contemporary Art, Media and Visual Culture

I. Methodologies
ARTH 203
(3)
Methods in Art History
ARTH 351
(3)
Vision and Visuality in Art History
ARTH 352
(3)
Feminism in Art and Art History
ARTH 400
(3)
Selected Methods in Art History
ARTH 500
(3)
Pro-Seminar
II. Architectural History
ARTH 204
(3)
Introduction to Medieval Art and Architecture
ARTH 314
(3)
The Medieval City
ARTH 332
(3)
Italian Renaissance Architecture
ARTH 333
(3)
Italian Baroque Architecture
ARTH 340
(3)
The Gothic Cathedral
ARTH 341
(3)
Romanesque Architecture in the West
ARTH 345
(3)
History of German Architecture
ARTH 347
(3)
19th Century Architecture
ARTH 348
(3)
20th Century Architecture
ARTH 415
(3)
Late Medieval & Renaissance Architecture in Northern Europe
ARTH 416
(3)
English Medieval Architecture
ARTH 460
(3)
Studies in Architectural History 1
ARTH 461
(3)
Studies in Architectural History 2
III. Medieval and Renaissance Art
ARTH 207
(3)
European Art (1400-1700)
ARTH 223
(3)
Early Renaissance Art in Italy
ARTH 312
(3)
Medieval Art 1
ARTH 313
(3)
Medieval Art 2
ARTH 324
(3)
High Renaissance Art in Italy
ARTH 325
(3)
Venetian High Renaissance Painting
ARTH 343
(3)
Northern European Art: Renaissance Period
ARTH 344
(3)
Northern European Art: 16th Century
IV. Baroque to 19th Century European Art
ARTH 205
(3)
Introduction to Modern Art
ARTH 207
(3)
European Art (1400-1700)
ARTH 310
(3)
Postcolonialism
ARTH 320
(3)
Baroque Art in Italy
ARTH 321
(3)
Baroque in the North
ARTH 323
(3)
Realism and Impressionism
ARTH 334
(3)
Eighteenth Century European Art
ARTH 335
(3)
Art in the Age of Revolution
ARTH 337
(3)
Modern Painting and Sculpture, Post-Impress to WWI
ARTH 435
(3)
Rubens, Van Dyck and Velasquez
ARTH 474
(3)
Studies in Later 18th and 19th Century Art
V. Contemporary Art, Media & Visual Culture
ARTH 300
(3)
Canadian Art to 1914
ARTH 301
(3)
Canadian Art 1914 - Present
ARTH 302
(3)
Aspects of Canadian Art
ARTH 338
(3)
Modern Art and Theory from WWI - 1960s
ARTH 339
(3)
Critical Issues - Contemporary Art
ARTH 360
(3)
Photography and Art
ARTH 510
(3)
The Body and Visual Culture
Special Courses
ARTH 209
(3)
Introduction to Classical Art
ARTH 353
(3)
Selected Topics in Art History 1
ARTH 354
(3)
Selected Topics in Art History 2
ARTH 374
(3)
Studies in Later 18th and 19th Century Art
ARTH 379
(3)
Studies: Modern Art and Theoretical Problems
ARTH 420
(3)
Selected Topics in Art and Architecture 1
ARTH 421
(3)
Selected Topics in Art and Architecture 2
ARTH 422
(3)
Selected Topics in Art and Architecture 3
ARTH 447
(3)
Independent Research Course
ARTH 474
(3)
Studies in Later 18th and 19th Century Art
ARTH 479
(3)
Studies: Modern Art and Theoretical Problems
ARTH 490
(3)
Museum Internship
Note:

In addition to architectural courses given by the Department, Program students are encouraged to consider courses given in the School of Architecture, and the Departments of East Asian Studies and Philosophy which may, upon consultation with the Department, be regarded as fulfiling part of the requirements.

ARCH 252 Introduction to Architectural History 1 [II]
ARCH 253 Introduction to Architectural History 2 [II]
EAST 303 Current Topics: Chinese Studies 1 [III]
PHIL 336 Aesthetics [I]
PHIL 436 Aesthetics 2 [I]

12.7 Canadian Ethnic Studies Minor Concentration

Chair
Morton Weinfeld, Department of Sociology, morton.weinfeld@mcgill.ca
Leacock 714, (514) 398-6853
Advisory Committee
G. Burgos (Sociology),Ian H. Henderson (Religious Studies), A.Hsia (German Studies), S. T. Saideman (Political Science), J. Torczyner (Social Work), U. Turgay (Islamic Studies)

The Minor Concentration in Canadian Ethnic Studies is an interdisciplinary program administered by the Faculty of Arts. It is affiliated with the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. The Concentration can be taken in conjunction with any primary program in Arts or Science. It offers to undergraduate students a structured framework in which to appreciate the range of social scientific approaches to the study of ethnic diversity in Canada. The term "ethnic" is used in a very broad sense, to include the full spectrum of ethnic, cultural, aboriginal, linguistic, and racial groups in Canada.

The disciplines featured in the program are Sociology, Anthropology, Geography, History, and Political Science. In special cases, courses taken from other Arts departments, and other units at McGill, may be considered (e.g., Social Work, Education), with the consent of the Chair. The same is true of new relevant courses not yet listed below.

Apart from the intrinsic interest and importance of the subject, the Concentration may be of practical use. Students pursuing further graduate and professional training or employment in a variety of areas will find familiarity with issues relating to cultural diversity to be an asset. These include the fields of health, social services, education, law, law enforcement, human resources and personnel; occupations in government agencies, in ethnocultural and other non-governmental organizations; and graduate work in all the social sciences.

The Canadian Ethnic Studies Concentration will also sponsor programs of interest for the McGill Community during the course of the year. Students interested in registering in this program should contact the Chair.

MINOR CONCENTRATION IN CANADIAN ETHNIC STUDIES
(18 credits)
Required Courses
(9 credits)
SOCI 210
(3)
Sociological Perspectives
SOCI 230
(3)
Sociology of Ethnic Relations
SOCI 475
(3)
Canadian Ethnic Studies Seminar

Of the 18 credits, selected with due regard to Faculty guidelines and course prerequisites, at least 9 must be above the 200 level.

Complementary Courses
(9 credits)
9 credits, at least 6 of which must be 300-level or higher, selected from two of the following departmental lists.
Anthropology
ANTH 202
(3)
Comparative Cultures
ANTH 205
(3)
Cultures of the World
ANTH 306
(3)
Native Peoples' History in Canada
ANTH 320
(3)
Social Evolution
ANTH 333
(3)
Class and Ethnicity
ANTH 338
(3)
Native Peoples of North America
ANTH 436
(3)
North American Native Peoples
Geography
GEOG 301
(3)
Geography of Nunavut
GEOG 331
(3)
Urban Social Geography
GEOG 424
(3)
Europe: Places and Peoples
History
HIST 203
(3)
Survey: Canada since 1867
HIST 371
(3)
Race/Ethnicity: U.S. since 1800
HIST 408
(3)
Colonialism and Native Peoples
HIST 423
(3)
Topics: Migration and Ethnicity
HIST 424
(3)
Asian Diaspora: Chinese Overseas
HIST 471D1
(3)
Canadian Immigration History
HIST 471D2
(3)
Canadian Immigration History
Political Science
POLI 226
(3)
La vie politique québécoise
POLI 321
(3)
Issues: Canadian Public Policy
POLI 336
(3)
Le Québec et le Canada
POLI 370
(3)
Révolution tranquille/changements politiques/ Québec de 1960
POLI 411
(3)
Immigration and Multiculturalism in Canada
POLI 412
(3)
Canadian Voting/Public Opinion
POLI 431
(3)
Nations and States/Developed World
POLI 478
(3)
The Canadian Constitution
Sociology
SOCI 234
(3)
Population and Society
SOCI 327
(3)
Jews in North America
SOCI 333
(3)
Social Stratification
SOCI 353
(3)
Inequality and Social Conflict
SOCI 366
(3)
Social Change in the Caribbean
SOCI 519
(3)
Sociology of Ethnic Conflict
SOCI 520
(3)
Migration and Immigrant Groups
SOCI 529
(3)
Social Inequality and Public Policy
Social Work
SWRK 400
(3)
Policy and Practice for Refugees

12.8 Canadian Studies Program (CANS)

McGill Institute for the Study of Canada
3463 Peel Street
Montreal, QC H3A 1W7 
Telephone: (514) 398-8346
Fax: (514) 398-7336
Website: www.misc-iecm.mcgill.ca 
Director
Antonia Maioni
Curriculum and Program Sub-Committee:
Nathalie Cooke (English)
Victoria Dickenson (McCord Museum)
Jane Everett (French Language and Literature)
Antonia Maioni (M.I.S.C.)
Christopher Manfredi (Political Science)
David McKnight (Libraries)
Gail Schmura (Geography)
Bruce Trigger (Anthropology)
One Representative from CSAUS
One Representative from GSGSA
Program Director (Student Adviser)
Nathalie Cooke

Canadian Studies will be of value to any student considering a career in education, law, government, social service, human resources, journalism and the media, and graduate work in the social sciences and humanities.

The Canadian Studies Major and Minor Concentrations seek to provide students with a comprehensive multidisciplinary view of the nature and growth of Canada. Students completing a Major Concentration in Canadian Studies are encouraged to complete a second Major Concentration in a discipline such as Anthropology, Economics, English Literature, History, Political Science or Sociology as a complement to their Canadian Studies requirements. The Minor Concentration may be taken in conjunction with any primary program in Arts or Science.

Students interested in pursuing Canadian Studies at the graduate level should consider a Joint Honours Program which includes the Canadian Studies Component.

MINOR CONCENTRATION IN CANADIAN STUDIES

(Expandable) (18 credits)
Required Course
(3 credits)
CANS 200
(3)
Introduction to the Study of Canada
Complementary Courses
(15 credits)
6 credits chosen from Canadian Studies (CANS) courses
9 credits to be chosen from two disciplines (see Complementary courses list below) other than the ones in which the student is doing other Major or Minor Concentrations. A minimum of 3 credits must be above the 200 level. A maximum of 3 credits may be chosen from French as a Second Language.
MAJOR CONCENTRATION IN CANADIAN STUDIES
(36 credits)
Required Course
(3 credits)
CANS 200
(3)
Introduction to the Study of Canada
Complementary Courses
(33 credits*)
3 credits, one of the following courses:
POLI 221
(3)
Government of Canada
POLI 222
(3)
Political Process and Behaviour in Canada
9 credits chosen from Canadian Studies (CANS) courses
3 credits taught in French, including language courses (see Complementary Courses listed below)
12 credits chosen from the Complementary Courses listed below, in the following manner:
3 credits in English or French-Canadian literature
3 credits in History
6 credits in Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Political Science or Sociology
6 additional credits from the Complementary Courses at the 300 level or above
* at least 3 of the 33 credits must be at the 400 level

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE LIST

Anthropology
ANTH 306
(3)
Native Peoples' History in Canada
ANTH 336
(3)
Ethnohistory: North Eastern North America
Art History
   
ARTH 479
(3)
Studies: Modern Art and Theoretical Problems
Economics
   
ECON 219
(3)
Current Economic Problems: Topics
ECON 223
(3)
Political Economy of Trade Policy
ECON 305
(3)
Industrial Organization
ECON 306D1
(3)
Labour Economics and Institutions
ECON 306D2
(3)
Labour Economics and Institutions
ECON 405
(3)
Natural Resource Economics
ECON 406
(3)
Topics In Economic Policy
ECON 408D1
(3)
Public Sector Economics
ECON 408D2
(3)
Public Sector Economics
ECON 434
(3)
Current Economic Problems
ECON 440
(3)
Health Economics
ECON 480
(3)
Research Project
ECON 481
(3)
Research Project
English
   
ENGL 229
(3)
Canadian Literature 2
ENGL 328
(3)
Development of Canadian Poetry 1
ENGL 339
(3)
Canadian Prose Fiction 2
ENGL 345
(3)
Literature and Society
ENGL 409
(3)
Studies in a Canadian Author
ENGL 410
(3)
Theme or Movement Canadian Literature
ENGL 415
(3)
Studies in 20th Century Literature 2
ENGL 419
(3)
Studies in 20th Century Literature
ENGL 499
(3)
Departmental Seminar
French as a Second Language
FRSL 207
(6)
Elementary French
FRSL 208
(6)
Intensive Elementary French
FRSL 211
(6)
Oral and Written French 1
FRSL 212
(3)
Oral and Written French 1
FRSL 215
(6)
Oral and Written French 1 - Intensive
FRSL 216
(3)
Découvrons Montréal en français
FRSL 302
(3)
Listening Comprehension and Oral Expression 1
FRSL 303
(3)
Listening Comprehension and Oral Expression 2
FRSL 321
(6)
Oral and Written French 2
FRSL 322
(3)
Oral and Written French 2
FRSL 325
(6)
Oral and Written French 2 - Intensive
FRSL 326
(3)
Découvrons le Québec en français
FRSL 332
(3)
Intermediate French: Grammar
FRSL 333
(3)
Intermediate French: Grammar
FRSL 407
(3)
Compréhension et expression orales
FRSL 408
(3)
Français oral: Textes et expressions
FRSL 431
(6)
Français fonctionnel avancé
FRSL 432
(3)
Français fonctionnel
FRSL 445
(3)
Français fonctionnel, écrit 1
FRSL 446
(3)
Français fonctionnel, écrit 2
FRSL 449
(3)
Le Français des médias
FRSL 455
(3)
Grammaire et création
French Language and Literature
FREN 252
(3)
Littérature québécoise
FREN 315
(3)
Le cinéma québécois
FREN 375
(3)
Théâtre québécois
FREN 382
(3)
Le roman québécois 2
FREN 487
(3)
L'essai québécois
Geography
   
GEOG 217
(3)
The Canadian City
GEOG 272
(3)
Earth's Changing Surface
GEOG 301
(3)
Geography of Nunavut
GEOG 309
(3)
Geography of Canada
GEOG 311
(3)
Canada - A Geo-Economic Perspective
GEOG 494
(3)
Urban Field Studies
GEOG 495
(3)
Field Studies - Physical Geography
GEOG 497
(3)
Ecology of Coastal Waters
GEOG 499
(3
Subarctic Field Studies
GEOG 502
(3)
Geography of Northern Development
History
   
HIST 202
(3)
Survey: Canada to 1867
HIST 203
(3)
Survey: Canada since 1867
HIST 303
(3)
History of Quebec
HIST 322
(3)
Canada: American Presence since 1939
HIST 333
(3)
History of New France: Part 1
HIST 334
(3)
History of New France: Part 2
HIST 363
(3)
Canada 1870-1914
HIST 370
(3)
Canada: 20th Century Political History
HIST 395
(3)
Canadian Military Experience
HIST 403
(3)
History of Quebec Institutions
HIST 423
(3)
Topics: Migration and Ethnicity
HIST 429
(3)
Topics: Canadian Family History
HIST 493D1
(3)
Topics: Canadian Social History
HIST 493D2
(3)
Topics: Canadian Social History
Linguistics
   
LING 320
(3)
Sociolinguistics 1
LING 350
(3)
Linguistic Aspects of Bilingualism
LING 521
(3)
Dialectology
Music
   
MUHL 391
(3)
Canadian Music
Political Science
POLI 221
(3)
Government of Canada
POLI 222
(3)
Political Process and Behaviour in Canada
POLI 226
(3)
La vie politique québécoise
POLI 378
(3)
The Canadian Judicial Process
POLI 411
(3)
Immigration and Multiculturalism in Canada
POLI 412
(3)
Canadian Voting/Public Opinion
POLI 446
(3)
Les politiques publiques au Québec
POLI 447
(3)
Canadian Constitutional Politics
POLI 478
(3)
The Canadian Constitution
Québec, Études sur le
QCST 300
(3)
Études sur le Québec
QCST 440
(3)
Aspects du Québec contemporain/
Aspects of Contemp. Quebec
Sociology
   
SOCI 210
(3)
Sociological Perspectives
SOCI 217
(3)
Canadian Mass Communications
SOCI 225
(3)
Medicine and Health in Modern Society
SOCI 230
(3)
Sociology of Ethnic Relations
SOCI 318
(3)
Television in Society
SOCI 327
(3)
Jews in North America
HONOURS IN CANADIAN STUDIES
(57 credits)

Students planning to pursue an Honours Program option are reminded that they must complete a Major Concentration (18 credits) in another Arts discipline to graduate.

Students with a GPA of 3.30 in their program courses and, in keeping with Faculty regulations, a minimum CGPA of 3.00 in general, are eligible to apply to the Honours Program in Canadian Studies; application deadlines are December 15 and May 15. Forms are available from the MISC Office.

Required Courses
(18 credits)
CANS 200
(3)
Introduction to the Study of Canada
CANS 480
(3)
Honours Thesis 1
CANS 481
(3)
Honours Thesis 2
CANS 501
(3)
Professional Development Seminar 1
HIST 202
(3)
Survey: Canada to 1867
HIST 203
(3)
Survey: Canada since 1867
Complementary Courses
(39 credits)
6 credits in Political Science, including one of the following courses:
POLI 221
(3)
Government of Canada
POLI 222
(3)
Political Process and Behaviour in Canada
3 credits in Canadian History
3 credits: French as a Second Language or courses given in French
3 credits: French-Canadian Literature or Quebec Literature in French
3 credits: English-Canadian Literature
3 credits: Canadian Geography
12 credits: Canadian Studies (CANS) courses, with a minimum of 6 credits at the 400 level or above
6 credits from the Complementary Courses list, with a minimum of 3 credits at the 400 level or above

CANADIAN STUDIES HONOURS COMPLEMENTARY COURSE LIST

Anthropology
ANTH 306
(3)
Native Peoples' History in Canada
ANTH 317
(3)
Prehistory of North America
ANTH 333
(3)
Class and Ethnicity
ANTH 336
(3)
Ethnohistory: North Eastern North America
ANTH 338
(3)
Native Peoples of North America
ANTH 436
(3)
North American Native Peoples
Art History
   
ARTH 301
(3)
Canadian Art 1914 - Present
ARTH 479
(3)
Studies: Modern Art and Theoretical Problems
Economics
   
ECON 219
(3)
Current Economic Problems: Topics
ECON 223
(3)
Political Economy of Trade Policy
ECON 305
(3)
Industrial Organization
ECON 306D1
(3)
Labour Economics and Institutions
ECON 306D2
(3)
Labour Economics and Institutions
ECON 405
(3)
Natural Resource Economics
ECON 406
(3)
Topics In Economic Policy
ECON 408D1
(3)
Public Sector Economics
ECON 408D2
(3)
Public Sector Economics
ECON 434
(3)
Current Economic Problems
ECON 440
(3)
Health Economics
ECON 480
(3)
Research Project
ECON 481
(3)
Research Project
English
   
ENGL 228
(3)
Canadian Literature 1
ENGL 229
(3)
Canadian Literature 2
ENGL 327
(3)
Canadian Prose Fiction 1
ENGL 328
(3)
Development of Canadian Poetry 1
ENGL 333
(3)
Development of Canadian Poetry 2
ENGL 339
(3)
Canadian Prose Fiction 2
ENGL 409
(3)
Studies in a Canadian Author
ENGL 410
(3)
Theme or Movement Canadian Literature
ENGL 411
(3)
Studies in Canadian Fiction
ENGL 527
(3)
Canadian Literature
French as a Second Language
FRSL 207D1
(3)
Elementary French
FRSL 207D2
(3)
Elementary French
FRSL 208
(6)
Intensive Elementary French
FRSL 211D1
(3)
Oral and Written French 1
FRSL 211D1
(3)
Oral and Written French 1
FRSL 212
(3)
Oral and Written French 1
FRSL 215
(6)
Oral and Written French 1 - Intensive
FRSL 216
(3)
Découvrons Montréal en français
FRSL 302
(3)
Listening Comprehension and Oral Expression 1
FRSL 303
(3)
Listening Comprehension and Oral Expression 2
FRSL 321D1
(3)
Oral and Written French 2
FRSL 321D2
(3)
Oral and Written French 2
FRSL 322
(3)
Oral and Written French 2
FRSL 325
(6)
Oral and Written French 2 - Intensive
FRSL 326
(3)
Découvrons le Québec en français
FRSL 332
(3)
Intermediate French: Grammar
FRSL 333
(3)
Intermediate French: Grammar
FRSL 407
(3)
Compréhension et expression orales
FRSL 408
(3)
Français oral: Textes et expressions
FRSL 431D1
(3)
Français fonctionnel avancé
FRSL 431D2
(3)
Français fonctionnel avancé
FRSL 432
(3)
Français fonctionnel
FRSL 445
(3)
Français fonctionnel, écrit 1
FRSL 446
(3)
Français fonctionnel, écrit 2
FRSL 449
(3)
Le Français des médias
FRSL 455
(3)
Grammaire et création
French Language and Literature
FREN 252
(3)
Littérature québécoise
FREN 315
(3)
Le cinéma québécois
FREN 375
(3)
Théâtre québécois
FREN 382
(3)
Le roman québécois 2
FREN 480
(3)
Roman québécois 3
FREN 487
(3)
L'essai québécois
Geography
   
GEOG 217
(3)
The Canadian City
GEOG 301
(3)
Geography of Nunavut
GEOG 309
(3)
Geography of Canada
GEOG 311
(3)
Canada - A Geo-Economic Perspective
GEOG 497
(3)
Ecology of Coastal Waters
GEOG 499
(3
Subarctic Field Studies
GEOG 502
(3)
Geography of Northern Development
History
   
HIST 202
(3)
Survey: Canada to 1867
HIST 203
(3)
Survey: Canada since 1867
HIST 303
(3)
History of Quebec
HIST 322
(3)
Canada: American Presence since 1939
HIST 332
(3)
Constitutional History: Canada - 1867
HIST 333
(3)
History of New France: Part 1
HIST 334
(3)
History of New France: Part 2
HIST 342
(3)
Canada: External Relations since 1867
HIST 343
(3)
Women in Post-Confederation Canada
HIST 357
(3)
Religion and Canadian Society in Historical Perspective
HIST 361
(3)
The Canadian West to 1905
HIST 362
(3)
The Canadian West since 1905
HIST 363
(3)
Canada 1870-1914
HIST 364
(3)
Canada 1914-1945
HIST 367
(3)
Canada since 1945
HIST 370
(3)
Canada: 20th Century Political History
HIST 373
(3)
Canadian Labour History
HIST 395
(3)
Canadian Military Experience
HIST 397
(3)
Canada: Ethnicity, Migration
HIST 403
(3)
History of Quebec Institutions
HIST 423
(3)
Topics: Migration and Ethnicity
HIST 429
(3)
Topics: Canadian Family History
HIST 432
(3)
The Atlantic Provinces
HIST 434
(3)
British North America 1760-1867
HIST 462D1
(3)
Topics: Canadian Conservatism
HIST 462D2
(3)
Topics: Canadian Conservatism
HIST 463D1
(3)
Topics: History of Women in Canada
HIST 463D2
(3)
Topics: History of Women in Canada
HIST 469D1
(3)
Topics in Canadian Religious History
HIST 469D2
(3)
Topics in Canadian Religious History
HIST 483D1
(3)
History of Montreal
HIST 483D2
(3)
History of Montreal
HIST 493D1
(3)
Topics: Canadian Social History
HIST 493D2
(3)
Topics: Canadian Social History
Linguistics
   
LING 320
(3)
Sociolinguistics 1
LING 350
(3)
Linguistic Aspects of Bilingualism
LING 520
(3)
Sociolinguistics 2
LING 521
(3)
Dialectology
Music
   
MUHL 391
(3)
Canadian Music
Political Science
POLI 221
(3)
Government of Canada
POLI 222
(3)
Political Process and Behaviour in Canada
POLI 226
(3)
La vie politique québécoise
POLI 378
(3)
The Canadian Judicial Process
POLI 379
(3)
Topics in Canadian Politics
POLI 411
(3)
Immigration and Multiculturalism in Canada
POLI 412
(3)
Canadian Voting/Public Opinion
POLI 446
(3)
Les politiques publiques au Québec
POLI 447
(3)
Canadian Constitutional Politics
POLI 478
(3)
The Canadian Constitution
Québec, Études sur le
QCST 300
(3)
Études sur le Québec
QCST 440
(3)
Aspects du Québec contemporain/
Aspects of Contemp. Quebec
Sociology
   
SOCI 210
(3)
Sociological Perspectives
SOCI 217
(3)
Canadian Mass Communications
SOCI 475
(3)
Canadian Ethnic Studies Seminar
JOINT HONOURS - CANADIAN STUDIES COMPONENT
(36 credits)

Students with a minimum program GPA of 3.30 in Canadian Studies Required and Complementary courses may apply to the Joint Honours Program in Canadian Studies. Forms are available from the MISC. There are two application deadlines, January 31 and the last day of classes for the Winter term.

Required Courses
(9 credits)
CANS 200
(3)
Introduction to the Study of Canada
CANS 492
(3)
Joint Honours Thesis
CANS 501
(3)
Pro-Seminar 1
Complementary Courses
(27 credits)
3 credits, one of the following:
POLI 221
(3)
Government of Canada
POLI 222
(3)
Political Process and Behaviour in Canada
9 credits: Canadian Studies (CANS) courses
3 credits: French as a Second Language or courses given in French
3 credits: French-Canadian or English-Canadian literature
3 credits: History
6 credits at the 400-level or above, chosen from the Complementary Courses list above, with the addition of:
ANTH 436
(3)
North American Native Peoples
FREN 480
(3)
Roman québécois 3
LING 520
(3)
Sociolinguistics 2

Joint Honours students must maintain a GPA of 3.30 in their program courses and, according to Faculty regulations, a minimum CGPA of 3.00 in general.

Students who wish to study at the Honours level in two disciplines can combine Joint Honours Program components from any two Arts disciplines, see section 11.4 "Joint Honours Programs" for a list of available programs.

Joint Honours students should consult an adviser in each department to discuss their course selection and their interdisciplinary research project (if applicable).

12.9 Catholic Studies Program (CATH)

Advisory Committee Chair
Professor David Williams, (Kennedy-Smith Professor of Catholic Studies) (English)
Advisory Committee
M. Dorsinville (English), P.Kirkpatrick (Relgious Studies), R. Myles (English and French Language Centre), F. Sabetti (Political Science), J.Schmidt (German Studies), H. Senior (History), J. Zucchi (History)
Adviser
Ines Scharnweber (Interdisciplinary Studies)
Interdisciplinary Studies, Leacock 439
Telephone: (514) 398-4804
E-Mail: ines.scharnweber@mcgill.ca 
The Minor Concentration in Catholic Studies seeks to enrich the intellectual experience and academic options available to students, to 
broaden the course offerings across the disciplines, and to complement the visibility given to other programs such as Jewish Studies, Islamic 
Studies, and North American Studies.  

The Minor Concentration consists of 18 credits. Core and complementary courses provide students an opportunity to deepen their understanding of Catholicism in an increasingly pluralistic world. The program offers a systematic and critical exploration of the diverse ways in which the Catholic tradition informs culture, institutions, and identity.

MINOR CONCENTRATION IN CATHOLIC STUDIES
(18 credits)
--------------------------------START OF REVISION----------------
Required Course
(3 credits)
CATH 200
(3)
Introduction to Catholicism
Complementary Courses
(15 credits)
9 credits chosen from:
CATH 310
(3)
Catholic Intellectual Traditions
CATH 315
(3)
Catholicism and Moral Culture
CATH 320
(3)
Scripture and Catholicism
CATH 325
(3)
The Religious Sense
CATH 340
(3)
Catholic Social Thought
CATH 370
(3)
Topics in Catholic Studies
CATH 460
(3)
Catholic Studies Seminar
6 credits chosen from the Complementary Course lists below:
3 credits from Group I: Catholicism and the Arts
3 credits from Group II: Catholic Social and Intellectual Traditions
--------------------------------END OF REVISION------------------------

COMPLEMENTARY COURSE LISTS

Group I: Catholicism and the Arts
Art History and Communication Studies
ARTH 320
(3)
Baroque Art in Italy
ARTH 340
(3)
The Gothic Cathedral
ARTH 415
(3)
Late Medieval & Renaissance Architecture in Northern Europe
Education
EDER 203
(3)
Philosophy of Religion
EDER 204
(3)
Man Before Reality
EDER 207
(3)
`Who is Christ?`
EDER 209
(3)
Search for Authenticity
EDER 394
(3)
Philosophy of God
EDER 396
(3)
Seminar: Contemporary Theology
EDER 491
(3)
Theological Themes
EDER 495
(3)
The Eucharist
English
ENGL 204
(3)
English Literature and the Bible
ENGL 357
(3)
Chaucer - Canterbury Tales
ENGL 424
(3)
Irish Literature
French Language and Literature
FREN 312
(3)
Francophonie 2
FREN 329
(3)
Civilisation québécoise 2
FREN 252
(3)
Littérature Québécoise
FREN 455
(3)
La littérature médiévale 1
Hispanic Studies
HISP 432
(3)
Literature - Discovery and Exploration Spain New World
Italian Studies
ITAL 320
(3)
Manzoni: Novel and Nationhood
ITAL 410
(3)
Modern Italian Literature
ITAL 461
(3)
Dante: The Divine Comedy
Music
   
MUHL 399
(3)
Church Music
Religious Studies
RELG 203
(3)
Bible and Western Culture
RELG 210
(3)
Jesus of Nazareth
RELG 311
(3)
New Testament Studies 1
RELG 312
(3)
New Testament Studies 2
RELG 341
(3)
Introduction: Philosophy of Religion
RELG 377
(3)
Religious Controversies
Group II: Catholic Social and Intellectual Traditions
East Asian Studies
EAST 385
(3)
Society and Community in Korea
Education
EDER 208
(3)
Philosophy of Human Nature
EDER 394
(3)
Philosophy of God
EDER 395
(3)
Moral Values and Human Action
EDER 494
(3)
Ethics in Practice
History
HIST 319
(3)
The Scientific Revolution
HIST 320
(3)
European Thought and Culture 1
HIST 321
(3)
European Thought and Culture 2
HIST 324
(3)
History of Ireland
HIST 325
(3)
Renaissance-Reformation Europe
HIST 336
(3)
France, 1789 to 1914
HIST 357
(3)
Religion and Canadian Society in Historical Perspective
HIST 360
(3)
Latin America since 1825
HIST 401
(3)
Topics: Medieval Culture and Society
HIST 405
(3)
European Cultural History 1
HIST 469D1
(3)
Topics in Canadian Religious History
HIST 469D2
(3)
Topics in Canadian Religious History
Philosophy
PHIL 334
(3)
Ethics 1
PHIL 356
(3)
Early Medieval Philosophy
PHIL 357
(3)
Late Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy
PHIL 474
(3)
Phenomenology
Political Science
POLI 226
(3)
La vie politique québécoise
POLI 318
(3)
Comparative Local Government
POLI 319
(3)
Politics of Latin America
POLI 321
(3)
Issues: Canadian Public Policy
POLI 370
(3)
Révolution tranquille/changements politiques/ Québec de 1960
POLI 414
(3)
Society and Politics in Italy
Religious Studies
RELG 320
(3)
History of Christian Thought 1
RELG 322
(3)
The Church in History 1
RELG 323
(3)
The Church in History 2
RELG 327
(3)
History of Christian Thought 2
RELG 340
(3)
Religion and the Sciences
Sociology
SOCI 315
(3)
Sociology of Religion

12.10 Classics Program (CLAS)

Stephen Leacock Building, Room 608
855 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2T7 
Telephone: (514) 398-3975
Fax: (514) 398-8365
Website: www.arts.mcgill.ca/programs/history/classics
E-mail: undergrad.history@mcgill.ca 
Emeritus Professor
Paolo Vivante (John MacNaughton Emeritus Professor of Classics)
Professor
T. Wade Richardson; B.A.(McG.), M.A., Ph.D.(Harv.)

Classics for the Non-Specialist

The Major and Minor Concentrations provide a useful complement for students in the arts and sciences. Several courses are offered which do not require a knowledge of Ancient Greek or Latin, suitable for students in other programs such as Anthropology, Art History, English, Languages, Linguistics, Philosophy, Political Science, Religious Studies.

Students of languages, literature and history may be interested in the introductory language courses offered: Latin, Ancient Greek and Modern Greek.

All courses in the Classics Program belong to one of three areas: Ancient Greek, Latin, and Ancient Greek and Roman History and Civilization.

All requirements are minimum requirements; students may take further courses in Classics if they so wish, in consultation with an adviser.

Classics for the Specialist

The Honours program is suitable for students who wish to pursue careers in the Classical languages and literature.

The following outlines represent Departmental requirements only. Each student's program must also satisfy the regulations imposed by the Faculty of Arts. Please consult the Faculty General Information section.

MINOR CONCENTRATION IN CLASSICS
(Expandable)
(18 credits)

In order to give students freedom to choose suitable concentrations, all courses in Classics programs are placed into the category "Complementary Courses".

Complementary Courses
(18 credits)
12 credits, 6 credits in each of two Classics areas at the 200 level;
6 credits in one of the two areas chosen.
MAJOR CONCENTRATION IN CLASSICS
(36 credits)

In order to give students freedom to choose suitable concentrations, all courses in Classics programs are placed into the category "Complementary Courses".

Complementary Courses
(36 credits)
12 credits, 6 credits in each of two Classics areas at the 200 level;
18 credits, 9 credits in each of two Classics areas at the 300+ level;
6 credits in any of the three Classics areas at the 300+ level.
HONOURS IN CLASSICS
(60 credits)

In order to give students freedom to choose suitable concentrations, all courses in Classics programs are placed into the category "Complementary Courses".

Classical Languages and Literatures
Complementary Courses
(60 credits)
21 credits in Ancient Greek or Latin;
12 - 21 credits in the other classical language;
6 credits for completion of a Reading List in one of the two languages (CLAS 515D1/CLAS 515D2 or CLAS 525D1/ CLAS 525D2/)
6 credits in Ancient Greek and Roman History;
6 - 15 credits in Classics or related courses.

According to Faculty regulations, Honours students must maintain a minimum CGPA of 3.00 and maintain a minimum program GPA of 3.00.

JOINT HONOURS - CLASSICS COMPONENT
(36 credits)

Thirty-six credits in Classics and related courses selected with the approval of the appropriate Undergraduate Adviser and 36 credits in the courses of another department. The 36 credits in Classics and related courses must include a sequence of at least 18 credits in Ancient Greek or Latin language and literature in the original, with a minimum of 3 credits at the 400 or 500 levels.

According to Faculty regulations, Joint Honours students must maintain a minimum CGPA of 3.00 and maintain a minimum program GPA of 3.00.
Students who wish to study at the Honours level in two disciplines can combine Joint Honours Program components from any two Arts disciplines; see section 11.4 "Joint Honours Programs" for a list of available programs.

Joint Honours students should consult an adviser in each department to discuss their course selection and their interdisciplinary research project (if applicable). For Classics, see the Undergraduate Adviser, L821, (514) 398-6206.

Notes:

      1. Students who intend to pursue graduate studies in Classics are advised to follow an Honours program.
      2. Honours students must maintain a CGPA of 3.00 or higher.
      3. Courses considered to be related to Classics are those given by the Departments of English, History, Linguistics, Philosophy, Political Science, and the Faculty of Religious Studies which are listed at the end of this section.

COURSES IN ANCIENT GREEK AND ROMAN HISTORY

Where courses in History are required for Classics programs, they must be taken from the following list:

HIST 205
Ancient Greek History
HIST 209
Ancient Roman History
HIST 366
History of Roman Law
HIST 368
Greek History: Classical
HIST 369
Greek History: Archaic
HIST 375
History of the Early Roman Empire
HIST 376
History of the Later Roman Empire
HIST 378
The Late Antique Roman World
HIST 379
Classical Greek Democracy
HIST 391
History of the Roman Republic
HIST 404
Greek History: Hellenistic Period
HIST 422
Roman Greece

RELATED COURSES

The following are "related courses" for the purpose of programs in Classics. Requests for other courses should be addressed to the Adviser.

English
ENGL 348
Great Writings of Europe 2
ENGL 354
Issues in Interpretative Practice
ENGL 371
History of the Theatre 2
History
HIST 205
Ancient Greek History
HIST 209
Ancient Roman History
HIST 339
Writing of History in Antiquity
HIST 366
History of Roman Law
HIST 368
Greek History: Classical
HIST 369
Greek History: Archaic
HIST 375
History of the Early Roman Empire
HIST 376
History of the Later Roman Empire
HIST 378
The Late Antique Roman World
HIST 379
Classical Greek Democracy
HIST 391
History of the Roman Republic
HIST 404
Greek History: Hellenistic Period
HIST 422
Roman Greece
Linguistics
 
LING 200
Introduction to the Study of Language
LING 201
Introduction to Linguistics
Philosophy
PHIL 345
Greek Political Theory
PHIL 353
The Presocratic Philosophers
PHIL 354
Plato
PHIL 355
Aristotle
PHIL 452
Later Greek Philosophy
PHIL 453
Ancient Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy
PHIL 454
Ancient Moral Theory
PHIL 551
Seminar: Ancient Philosophy 2
Political Science
POLI 333
Western Political Theory 1
Religious Studies
RELG 280
Elementary New Testament Greek
RELG 381
Advanced New Testament Greek

12.11 Minor in Cognitive Science

Students with an interest in cognition may want to consider the Minor in Cognitive Science, under Science.

Computing Course for Arts

See section 12.2.1 "Arts Educational Technology (ARET)".

12.12 Computer Science (COMP)

McConnell Engineering Building, Room 318
Telephone: (514) 398-7071
Fax: (514) 398-3883
E-mail: judy.kenigsberg@mcgill.ca
Website: www.cs.mcgill.ca 

Students must have completed MATH 133, MATH 140, MATH 141or equivalents in order to begin taking courses in this program.

For a list of teaching staff, an outline of the nature of computer science and the opportunities for study in this discipline, see the Science entry Computer Science (COMP). The School also offers programs in the Faculties of Engineering, Management and Music.

MINOR CONCENTRATION IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

(Non-expandable) (18 credits)

This Minor Concentration may be taken in conjunction with any program in the Faculty of Arts with the approval of the Adviser of the student's main program and the School of Computer Science. At the time of registration in the penultimate year, students must declare their intent to receive the Minor and approval must be given by the School for the particular sequence of courses the student wishes to use for the Minor Concentration.

Required Courses
(12 credits)
COMP 202
(3)
Introduction to Computing 1
COMP 203
(3)
Introduction to Computing 2
COMP 206
(3)
Introduction to Software Systems
COMP 302
(3)
Programming Languages and Paradigms
Complementary Courses
(6 credits)
selected from:
COMP 273
(3)
Introduction to Computer Systems
COMP 310
(3)
Computer Systems and Organization
COMP 335
(3)
Software Engineering Methods
COMP 350
(3)
Numerical Computing
or MATH 317
(3)
Numerical Analysis
COMP 360
(3)
Algorithm Design Techniques
COMP 420
(3)
Files and Databases
COMP 421
(3)
Database Systems
COMP 424
(3)
Topics: Artificial Intelligence 1
COMP 426
(3)
Automated Reasoning
COMP 433
(3)
Personal Software Engineering
COMP 435
(3)
Basics of Computer Networks
COMP 462
(3)
Computational Biology Methods
COMP 505
(3)
Advanced Computer Architecture
COMP 506
(3)
Advanced Analysis of Algorithms
COMP 507
(3)
Computational Geometry
COMP 520
(4)
Compiler Design
COMP 523
(3)
Language-based Security
COMP 524
(3)
Theoretical Foundations of Programming Languages
COMP 533
(3)
Object-Oriented Sofware Development
COMP 534
(3)
Team Software Engineering
COMP 535
(3)
Computer Networks 1
COMP 537
(3)
Internet Programming
COMP 538
(3)
Person-Machine Communication
COMP 540
(3)
Matrix Computations
COMP 547
(3)
Cryptography and Data Security
COMP 557
(3)
Fundamentals of Computer Graphics
COMP 560
(3)
Graph Algorithms and Applications
COMP 563
(3)
Molecular Evolution Theory
COMP 564
(3)
Computational Gene Regulation
COMP 566
(3)
Discrete Optimization 1
COMP 573
(3)
Microcomputers
COMP 575
(3)
Fundamentals of Distributed Algorithms
or courses outside of the School approved by the adviser.
MINOR CONCENTRATION IN COMPUTER SYSTEMS

(Combinable) (18 credits)

This Minor Concentration may be taken only by students registered in the Major Concentration in Foundations of Computing. Taken together, these constitute a program very close to the Major in Computer Science offered by the Faculty of Science. Students who are interested in a career as a computing professional should take this combination in order to match the traditional expectations of employers.

Students with two programs in the same department must have a third in a different discipline to be eligible to graduate. Please refer to the Faculty of Arts Degree Requirements, departmental programs.

Required Courses
(9 credits)
COMP 206
(3)
Introduction to Software Systems
COMP 273
(3)
Introduction to Computer Systems
COMP 310
(3)
Computer Systems and Organization
Complementary Courses
(9 credits)
selected from:
COMP 303
(4)
Programming Techniques
COMP 304
(3)
Object-Oriented Design
COMP 335
(3)
Software Engineering Methods
COMP 409
(3)
Concurrent Programming
COMP 410
(3)
Mobile Computing
COMP 412
(3)
Software for e-commerce
COMP 420
(3)
Files and Databases
COMP 421
(3)
Database Systems
COMP 423
(3)
Data Compression
COMP 424
(3)
Topics: Artificial Intelligence 1
COMP 433
(3)
Personal Software Engineering
COMP 435
(3)
Basics of Computer Networks
COMP 462
(3)
Computational Biology Methods
COMP 490
(3)
Introduction to Probabilistic Analysis of Algorithms
COMP 505
(3)
Advanced Computer Architecture
COMP 506
(3)
Advanced Analysis of Algorithms
COMP 507
(3)
Computational Geometry
COMP 520
(4)
Compiler Design
COMP 522
(4)
Modelling and Simulation
COMP 523
(3)
Language-based Security
COMP 524
(3)
Theoretical Foundations of Programming Languages
COMP 526
(3)
Probabilistic Reasoning and AI
COMP 531
(3)
Theory of Computation