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Undergraduate Programs
Calendar 2004-05


Faculty of Engineering, including Schools of Architecture and Urban Planning

1 The Faculty

1.1 Location

Macdonald Engineering Building
817 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2K6
Canada 
Website: www.mcgill.ca/engineering 
Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office:
	Macdonald Engineering Building, Room 378
	Telephone: (514) 398-7257 

1.2 Administrative Officers

John E. GruzleskI; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Queen's), Ph.D.(Tor.), Eng.

Dean

Jim Nicell; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Windsor), P. Eng.

Associate Dean (Student Affairs)

David L. Frost; B.A.Sc.(U.B.C.), M.S., Ph.D.(Caltech), P.Eng.

Associate Dean (Academic)

Juan H. Vera; B.Mat.(Chile), Ing.Quim.(U.T.E.), M.S. (Berkeley), Dr.Ing.(Santa Maria), Ing.

Associate Dean (Research)

David Covo; B.Sc.(Arch.), B.Arch.(McG.), M.R.A.I.C., O.A.Q.

Director, School of Architecture

David F. Brown; B.A.(Bishop's), M.U.P.(McG.), Ph.D. (Sheffield)

Director, School of Urban Planning

Richard J. Munz; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc.(Wat.), Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.

Chair, Department of Chemical Engineering

Denis Mitchell; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.), F.A.C.I., Eng.

Chair, Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

David A. Lowther; B.Sc.(London), Ph.D.(C.N.A.A.), P.Eng.

Chair, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Arun K. Misra; B.Tech.(I.I.T., Kharagpur), Ph.D.(U.B.C.),
P. Eng.

Chair, Department of
Mechanical Engineering

Robin A.L. Drew; B.Tech.(Bradford), Ph.D.(Newcastle)

Chair, Department of Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering

Jonathan Rousham

Building Administrator

Steve Yue; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Leeds)

Secretary of Faculty

Ida Godefroy

Assistant to the Dean

Judy Pharo

Faculty Student Advisor

Nancy Czemmel

Records Student Affairs Officer

Debbie Morzajew

Manager, EMF

Suse Vodopivec

Banner SIS Trainer

1.3 Historical Note

The Faculty of Engineering began in 1871 as the Department of Practical and Applied Science in the Faculty of Arts with degree programs in Civil Engineering and Surveying, Mining Engineering and Assaying, and Practical Chemistry. Diploma courses had been offered from 1859, and by 1871 the staff and enrolments had increased sufficiently to justify the creation of the Department. Continued growth led to the formation of the Faculty of Applied Science in 1878. By 1910 there were ten degree programs offered, including Architecture and Railroad Engineering. Subsequent changes in the overall pattern of the University led to the creation of the Faculty of Engineering in 1931 with a departmental structure very similar in name to that which exists at present.

1.4 The Faculty Today

The Faculty currently includes five engineering departments and two schools:

The Departments

Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering

The Schools

Architecture
Urban Planning

The Faculty serves approximately 2,300 undergraduate students and 700 graduate students in a wide variety of academic programs.

Undergraduate programs leading to professional bachelor degrees are offered in all Engineering Departments. These programs are designed to qualify the graduates for immediate employment in a wide range of industries and for membership in the appropriate professional bodies. Additionally, a non-professional undergraduate degree is offered in the School of Architecture for those who plan to work in related fields not requiring professional qualification. The curricula are structured to provide suitable preparation for those who plan to continue their education in post-graduate studies either at McGill or elsewhere. The professional degrees in Architecture and Urban Planning are offered at the Master's level and are described in the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar.

The academic programs are divided into required and complementary sections. The required courses emphasize those basic principles which permit graduates to keep abreast of progress in technology throughout their careers. Exposure to current technology is provided by the wide variety of complementary courses which allow students to pursue in depth a particular interest. For program details refer to section 4 "Academic Programs".

An internship program involving a paid 8- to 16-month industrial work experience is available to Engineering and Science students. Generally, students will enter the internship program before starting their final year of undergraduate studies. Details can be found in section 2.9 "IYES: Internship Year for Engineering and Science". In addition, CO-OP programs are offered in Mining Engineering and in Metals and Materials Engineering.

Postgraduate programs leading to Master's and doctoral degrees are offered in all sectors of the Faculty. Numerous areas of specialization are available in each of the departments and schools. All postgraduate programs including the professional degree programs in Architecture and in Urban Planning are described in the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar.

1.5 Special Facilities and Related Programs

1.5.1 Engineering Microcomputing Facility

In addition to the services provided by the Computing Centre, the Faculty, in conjunction with its departments and schools, maintains specialized computing and information resources in support of teaching and research. These vary from desktop PCs distributed throughout the Engineering complex to very high performance scientific workstations found in the research laboratories. Each unit organizes and maintains facilities that are designed around specific roles, e.g., CAD/CAM, microelectronic design, software engineering, circuit simulation, process control, polymers, structural mechanics, metal processing, etc., in addition to systems dedicated to administrative support.

The role of the Faculty is to provide access to computing resources on a 24-hour basis and to provide services that are not covered by individual units. The Faculty works in close cooperation with the McGill Computing Centre, which provides remote access to the Faculty network.

1.5.2 Bioresource Engineering

The Faculty of Engineering cooperates with the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences in providing courses of instruction for a curriculum in agricultural and biosystems engineering to meet requirements for a professional degree awarded in the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The second term of the penultimate year of the program is given by the Faculty of Engineering on the downtown campus. Details of the curriculum can be found under the Department of Bioresource Engineering.

Some of the courses offered by the Department of Bioresource Engineering (Subject Code ABEN) may be of interest to students in the Faculty of Engineering.

1.5.3 Department of Biomedical Engineering

Lyman Duff Medical Sciences Building
3775 University Street
Montreal, QC  H3A 2B4 
Telephone: (514) 398-8278 

Engineering undergraduates who are interested in the biomedical applications of engineering techniques should contact the Chair of their department or the graduate Chair of Biomedical Engineering. Some of the courses offered by the Department (Subject Code BMDE) may be of interest to Engineering students, and may be approved as complementary courses. For more information, students should consult section Course Information and Regulations

1.6 Library Facilities

The University has numerous libraries. Specifically serving Engineering, Architecture, and Urban Planning is the Schulich Library of Science and Engineering. Other McGill libraries of interest to students in the Faculty of Engineering are: Blackader-Lauterman Library of Architecture and Art, Walter Hitschfeld Geographic Information Centre, Edward Rosenthall Mathematics and Statistics Library, and the Howard Ross Management Library. Further information is available on the Web at www.library.mcgill.ca.

2 General Information

2.1 Admission Requirements

The Faculty of Engineering offers programs leading to the degrees of B.Eng. and B.Sc.(Arch.). Enrolment in some programs is limited.

Specific information on admissions requirements for Quebec students, students from provinces of Canada other than Quebec, and applicants from outside of Canada can be found in Admission Requirements.

2.2 Exchange Programs

The Faculty of Engineering participates in a number of bilateral exchange programs that provide undergraduates with an opportunity to study in Australia, Austria, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore, Sweden, United Kingdom, and US. Applicants must have completed at least one year of study and have maintained an average of 3.00 or better. Further information may be obtained from the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office, or the Exchange Officer, Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office.

2.3 Transfer Credits

In certain cases, credit may be granted for courses passed with a grade of C or better at other universities, up to a maximum of 45 credits for Engineering and 42 credits for Architecture. For further information, please see Transfer Credits.

2.4 Advanced Credit Examinations

Please note: this exam will not be given in 2004.

Prior to their first registration, the Faculty of Engineering offers the opportunity for students entering the Faculty from a Quebec CEGEP program to receive advanced credit in MATH 262 Intermediate Calculus upon successful completion of the Advanced Credit Examination. The examination covers material that has a similarity to the syllabus of the CEGEP Calculus III course. For specific date(s) and time(s) of the examination, please refer to the Faculty of Engineering Website at www.mcgill.ca/engineering/new students.

In all engineering programs, students who are successful in the MATH 262 Intermediate Calculus examination will automatically have the number of credits required for the completion of their program reduced by three.

2.5 Registration

Students who are currently registered and intend to return to the same degree program in the following academic session are required to register following procedures outlined in this Calendar, see Registration. It is mandatory for all returning students to see a Departmental Academic Advisor in their department for course confirmation during the first two weeks of the fall term and, if changes are being made, during the first two weeks of the winter term.

Information regarding course registration is sent to new students at the time of admission. All new students must see a Departmental Academic Advisor during the advising period.

2.5.1 Registration for Continuing Education Courses

Students may register for Continuing Education courses through Minerva. Students must refer to the Centre for Continuing Education Calendar and Schedule for course information and deadlines. Language courses given through Continuing Education will not count for credits. For further information, contact the Student Affairs Office.

2.5.2 Course Withdrawal

Students may withdraw from a course without academic penalty provided they do so within the appropriate deadlines of the term. Beyond this time their names will appear on the mark reports and, in the event that they do not take the examination, they will be given a J grade.

2.6 Advising

All students are required to seek academic advising about their programs from the department in which they study. Additional information may be obtained by calling:

General Information (514) 398-7257
Architecture (514) 398-6702
Chemical Engineering (514) 398-4494
Civil Engineering (514) 398-6860
Electrical and Computer Engineering (514) 398-7344
Mechanical Engineering (514) 398-8070
Metals and Materials Engineering (514) 398-4755 ext. 4365
Mining Engineering (514) 398-4755 ext. 0573
Urban Planning (514) 398-4075

2.7 Student Activities

The campus offers a wide variety of extracurricular activities for students. All are encouraged to participate. Many of these are organized within the Faculty under the auspices of the Engineering Undergraduate Society (EUS), or the Architectural Student Association (ASA). Both of these organizations publish handbooks describing their operations and the activities of various Faculty clubs and societies. All undergraduate students automatically become members of the EUS or the ASA, as appropriate.

2.8 Scholarships and Bursaries

Scholarships, bursaries and loans are open to students in the Faculty of Engineering. Students should consult the Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards Calendar available on the Web at www.mcgill.ca or from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office. Specific information concerning these awards may be obtained from the Faculty Student Advisor, Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office.

2.9 IYES: Internship Year for Engineering and Science

Employers value experience. The IYES Program allows students to gain professional work experience during the course of their undergraduate studies while at the same time earning a salary within the average range of those for entry-level professional positions. Other benefits include:

Employment through the IYES Program typically begins in January or May and continues for 8, 12 or 16 months, including a 4-month probationary training period. Employers choose the most suitable students for their organization through the application, interview and ranking process. While employed by the participating companies, students work on assignments related to their field of study. Students switch to the Internship Program from the regular program when they accept an Internship placement. Successful completion of an 8 to 16-month internship will qualify the student to graduate with the Internship Program designation, which will be noted on the student's permanent record.

STUDENT ELIGIBILITY

All students participating in this program must:

In addition, it is recommended that the student be able to demonstrate strong leadership and communication skills.

COST

Further information can be obtained from the website www.mecc. mcgill.ca or by sending an e-mail to info@mecc.mcgill.ca.

2.10 Calculators in Faculty Tests and Examinations

The use of calculators during tests and examinations is at the discretion of the course instructor. If a calculator is permitted in the examination, the Faculty requires that the students use a Faculty Standard Calculator, i.e., the CASIO fx-991 or the Sharp EL-546L, R, V(VB) and G only. These calculators are non-programmable, inexpensive, available through local dealers, e.g., EUS General Store in McConnell Engineering Building, and have many features of interest to Engineering students. Any model fx-991 or EL-546 is acceptable, regardless of the letter suffix which appears after the model number. All Engineering students are expected to own one of the two Faculty Standard Calculators.

3 Academic Requirements

3.1 Degree Requirements

In order to obtain a Bachelor's degree, students must complete one of the departmental programs described in section 4 "Academic Programs".

3.1.1 Entrance Requirements

The degree programs in the Faculty of Engineering are designed for students who have completed a general and basic science program. This basic science requirement consists of two terms of calculus, chemistry, physics, one term of vectors, matrices and analytical geometry and one term of humanities or social sciences.

Students entering the Faculty of Engineering from Quebec complete these courses at CEGEP and enter a seven-term program.

Students entering from outside Quebec with a high school diploma generally enter an eight-term program and complete the basic science requirements at McGill.

Students who have completed Advanced Placement Exams, Advanced Levels, the International Baccalaureate, the French Baccalaureate, or McGill placement and/or advanced credit examinations may receive exemptions and/or credits for all or part of the basic science requirements. Similarly, students who have completed courses at other universities or colleges may receive exemptions and/or credits. Please see www.mcgill.ca/engineering/new students for specific information on transfer credits.

3.1.2 Basic Science Requirements for Students Entering from Outside Quebec

Generally, students admitted to Engineering from outside Quebec are required to complete the basic science requirements outlined below, in addition to the departmental programs described in section 4 "Academic Programs"

CHEM 110
(4 credits)
General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120
(4 credits)
General Chemistry 2
MATH 140
(3 credits)
Calculus 1
or MATH 139
(4 credits)
Calculus
or MATH 150
(4 credits)
Calculus A
MATH 141
(4 credits)
Calculus 2
or MATH 152
(4 credits)
Calculus E
MATH 133
(3 credits)
Vectors, Matrices and Geometry
PHYS 131
(4 credits)
Mechanics and Waves
PHYS 142
(4 credits)
Electromagnetism and Optics
xxxx xxx
(3 credits)
Humanities/Social Sciences course

.

Calculus courses MATH 150/MATH 152 are designed for students who have completed a course in high school calculus. Students who complete the Calculus sequence MATH 150/MATH 152 will receive exemption with credit from MATH 262 (Intermediate Calculus), in the regular Engineering program.

In the event that the student has some prior calculus, but is not sufficiently confident to proceed with MATH 150/MATH 152, the appropriate sequence is MATH 140/MATH 141.

If a student has no previous calculus exposure, MATH 150/ MATH 152 may be replaced with MATH 139/MATH 141.

Students who are uncertain as to which calculus course sequence is appropriate for them should contact Ms. Pharo, Faculty Student Advisor in the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office (514) 398-7256.

Students who successfully complete one, or more, McGill Placement Tests will obtain credit for the equivalent(s) , i.e., CHEM 110, CHEM 120, MATH 140, MATH 141, MATH 133, PHYS 131, PHYS 142. Details are provided on the Faculty Website at www.mcgill.ca/engineering.

Students entering with advanced standing credits (Advanced Placements, Advanced Levels, International Baccalaureate examinations, McGill Placement Tests) are required to meet with the Faculty Student Advisor, Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office, to finalize their program of studies. (This must be done prior to meeting with the Departmental Advisor.) An information session will be held prior to the advising sessions to process these advanced credits. Information is available on the Faculty Website at www.mcgill.ca/engineering.

3.1.3 Architecture - Basic Science Requirements for Students Entering from Outside Quebec

Generally, students admitted to Architecture from outside Quebec are required to complete the following courses:

CHEM 110
(4 credits)
General Chemistry 1
CHEM 120
(4 credits)
General Chemistry 2
MATH 139
(4 credits)
Calculus
or MATH 140
(3 credits)
Calculus 1
MATH 141
(4 credits)
Calculus 2
MATH 133
(3 credits)
Vectors, Matrices and Geometry
PHYS 131
(4 credits)
Mechanics and Waves
PHYS 142
(4 credits)
Electromagnetism and Optics

Students may write McGill Placement Tests to obtain credit for CHEM 110, CHEM 120, MATH 140, MATH 141, MATH 133, PHYS 131 and PHYS 142, in the event that they have studied similar material previously. Details on the advanced placement examinations are provided in Welcome to McGill. Information is also available on the Faculty Website at www.mcgill.ca/engineering/newstudents.

3.2 Degrees and Requirements for Professional Registration

Non-Professional:

Bachelor of Science (Architecture)

The first professional degree in architecture is the Master of Architecture I. The description of the M.Arch. I program can be found in the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar.

Professional:

Bachelor of Engineering
Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)
Bachelor of Software Engineering

The B.Eng. programs are accredited by the Accreditation Board of the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers and fulfill the academic requirements for admission to the provincial engineering professional organizations. All students are encouraged to seek professional registration after graduation. To become a Professional Engineer, a graduate must pass an examination on legal aspects as well as on the principles of professional practice, and acquire two to four years of engineering experience, depending on the province. Only persons duly registered may use the title of "engineer" and perform the professional activities reserved for engineers by the provincial laws and regulations.

Graduates of the Bachelor of Software Engineering program should be eligible for accreditation (once accreditation standards for Software Engineers have been adopted).

In Quebec, the professional engineering body is the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec (OIQ). In order to better prepare new graduates for the practice of their profession, McGill organizes seminars in cooperation with the Ordre on various aspects of the profession. The OIQ also has a student section. As soon as students have accumulated 60 credits in a B.Eng. program, they can join the Student Section of the OIQ. Registration is free.

For more information, visit the Websites of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec, www.oiq.qc.ca, and of the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers, www.ccpe.ca.

3.3 Prerequisites and/or Corequisites

Prerequisites and/or corequisites must be completed prior to course registration, if applicable. If a student has registered for a course and did not satisfy the prerequisites and/or corequisites, the course may be dropped from his/her record automatically by Minerva.

Those students who have received advance credits/exemptions or passed a placement exam, and are blocked from registration into a course due to a prerequisite and/or corequisite block, must complete a Course Authorization Form and submit it to the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office. A Departmental advisor must sign and make a notation on the Course Authorization Form indicating that the prerequisite and/or corequisite has been satisfied.

Further information may be obtained from the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office, Macdonald Engineering Building, Room 378.

3.4 Complementary Studies

Engineering students must complete 6 credits of additional complementary courses as follows:

The three credits under (i) are to be chosen from the following list of courses which relate to the impact of technology on society.

CHEE 230
Environmental Aspects of Technology
CHEE 430
Technology Impact Assessment
CIVE 469
Infrastructure and Society
ECON 225
Economics of the Environment
ENVR 201
Society and Environment
GEOG 200
Geographical Perspectives: World Environmental Problems
GEOG 203
Environmental Systems
GEOG 205
Global Change: Past, Present and Future
GEOG 302
Environmental Management 1
MIME 308
Social Impact of Technology
PHIL 343
Biomedical Ethics
SOCI 235
Technology and Society
SOCI 312
Industrial Sociology

The course(s) under (ii) are to be chosen from:

A.  Humanities and Social Sciences

Any course at the 200 level or above from the departments of:

- Anthropology (Subject Code ANTH)

- Economics (any 200 or 300 level course excluding ECON 208, ECON 217, ECON 227, ECON 259 and ECON 337)

- History (Subject Code HIST)

- Philosophy (excluding PHIL 210)

- Political Science (Subject Code POLI)

- Psychology (excluding PSYC 204, PSYC 305 and PSYC 435 but including PSYC 100)

- Religious Studies (Subject Code RELG)

- School of Social Work (Subject Code SWRK)

- Sociology (excluding SOCI 350)

or ARCH 350 The Material Culture of Canada

or ENVR 203 Knowledge, Ethics and Environment

or ENVR 400 Environmental Thought

or MATH 338 History and Philosophy of Mathematics

B.  Administrative Studies and Law
Faculty of Engineering
FACC 220
Law for Architects and Engineers
Faculty of Management
(Management courses have limited enrolment and registration dates, see Calendar of Dates.)
BUSA 465
Technological Entrepreneurship
INDR 294
Introduction to Labour-Management Relations
MGCR 222
Introduction to Organizational Behaviour
MGCR 320
Managing Human Resources
MGCR 352
Marketing Management 1
MGCR 360
Social Context of Business
MRKT 360
Marketing of Technology
ORGB 321
Leadership

C.  Language Courses

Any language course which is deemed by the academic advisor to have a sufficient cultural component or, in the case of a student who was not already proficient in a specific language, program credit will be given for the second of two successfully completed, academically approved 3-credit language courses.

3.5 Student Progress

The B.Eng. programs may be completed in seven terms. The B.Sc.(Arch.) program may be completed in six or eight terms, depending upon point of entry.

A student must successfully complete the B.Eng. or B.Sc.(Arch.) programs within six years of entry. Candidates admitted to a lengthened program, or to a shortened program because of advanced standing, or who are participating in the IYES program, will have a correspondingly greater or lesser period in which to complete their program. Extensions may be granted by the Committee on Standing in cases of serious medical problems or where other similarly uncontrollable factors have affected a student's progress.

3.5.1 Letter Grades

In the Faculty of Engineering, letter grades are assigned according to the grading scheme adopted by the professor in charge of a particular course. They have the designations:

A, A-
Very Good
J
Unexcused Absence
B+, B, B-
Good
K
Incomplete
C+, C
Satisfactory
KF
Incomplete Failed
D
Conditional Pass
L
Deferred
F
Failed
T
Credit by examination only

Grades A, B and C indicate satisfactory results. Grade D indicates marginal results which may be acceptable for peripheral courses but not for core courses required by the program. The classification of a course as core or peripheral depends on the individual student's program and will be decided by the department concerned. Grade F is a permanent grade indicating unsatisfactory results. Grade J indicates an unexcused failure to submit assignments or an unexcused absence from an examination. It is equivalent to an F grade.

3.5.2 Incomplete Course Deadlines

Those students with a K grade (incomplete) MUST complete the course within three (3) months, after which the student will be given a grade of KF (incomplete/failed). The deadline for Fall Term courses is March 31 (January 15 for Winter graduation); for Winter Term courses it is August 15 (May 15 for Spring graduation) and for Summer Term courses it is December 1 (October 1 for Fall graduation).

If the student is unable to complete the course within the given deadlines, a request for an extension must be forwarded to the Associate Dean (Student Affairs). If an extension has already been permitted, the Faculty will make the necessary corrections.

3.5.3 Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option

The Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option (S/U) may be used for elective courses only.

Students must specify courses as S/U at the time of registration. The option will not be added manually to a student's record after the Drop/Add deadline or once a mark has been submitted by the Faculty. Once a mark has been submitted, this option will not be reversed.

Note:

To be considered for scholarships/renewal of awards, students must complete at least 27 credits in the regular academic session exclusive of courses completed under this option.

3.5.4 Course Credits

The credit assigned to a particular course reflects the amount of effort it demands of the student. One credit normally represents three hours total work per week. This is, in general, a combination of lecture hours and other contact hours such as laboratory periods, tutorials and problem periods as well as personal study hours. As a guide, the average division of time for a course is indicated in hours in the course listing after the course credit. For example, (3) (3-0-6) indicates a three-credit course consisting of three lecture hours per week, no other contact hours and six hours of personal study per week.

3.5.5 Grade Point Averages and Extra Courses

The Faculty calculates a term grade point average (TGPA). Any courses taken which lie outside the program are classified as extra, are indicated by an "X" on transcript, and do not affect the grade point average. Students must receive departmental approval for such courses, and the course must be identified and recorded prior to writing the final examination. Students

should consult the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office for

approval.

3.5.6 Academic Standing Decisions

In the Faculty of Engineering, a decision on the student's academic standing is based on the CGPA (Cumulative Grade Point Average) according to the criteria listed below.

Note:

The Faculty makes academic standing decisions after the completion of each term (Fall, Winter, Summer) based on academic results to date. Thus, if a student has been granted permission to defer one or more examinations, the standing decision will be made regardless of such deferrals.

Please see below for further information about academic standing decisions.

Satisfactory Standing

Students in satisfactory standing may proceed, with the following conditions:

All core courses in which D or F grades were obtained must either be repeated successfully (grade C or better) or be replaced by an alternative approved course which is completed successfully.

All other courses in which F grades were obtained must either be repeated successfully at some point before graduation or be replaced by some alternative approved course which is completed successfully before graduation.

Students in poor academic standing are strongly urged to contact the Student Affairs Office to discuss their situation. Office staff are available to help guide students and to provide useful advice to help students achieve their goals. Helpful workshops are provided by Student Services, e.g., study skills, stress management, test anxiety. Students who are experiencing difficulties are encouraged to explore these avenues.

Probationary Standing

Students placed on Probationary Standing may proceed with their studies under the following conditions.

Students must reduce their credit load to a maximum of 13 credits per term and must achieve at the end of the term either a CGPA of 2.00 or better, or a term GPA (TGPA) of 2.50 or better in order to continue.

A student whose TGPA is 2.50 or better, but whose CGPA is less than 2.00, may continue on with his/her studies but will remain on Probationary Standing.

Failure to achieve either the TGPA or CGPA requirements noted above will result in the student being placed on "Unsatisfactory Standing" (see below). Students will remain on probationary standing until they achieve a CGPA equal to or exceeding 2.00, at which time their standing will be changed to "satisfactory".

Students placed on Probationary Standing who need to reduce their credit load but are unable to drop course(s) must complete a Course Authorization Form and submit it to the Student Affairs Office. The course(s) will then be deleted manually from the student's record.

Unsatisfactory Standing

Students who have been placed on Unsatisfactory Standing will be asked to withdraw from the Faculty of Engineering for a minimum of one term. Courses for which the student is currently registered will be deleted automatically from the student's record by the Faculty.

After a minimum of one term away, the student can apply for readmission. A request for readmission must be made in writing in a letter addressed to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs in the Student Affairs Office. If readmitted, the student will be placed back on Probationary Standing. Students will remain on probationary standing until they achieve a CGPA greater than or equal to 2.00, at which time their standing will be changed to "satisfactory".

While on probation during that term and subsequent terms, the student must reduce his/her credit load to a maximum of 13 credits per term, and must meet or exceed the minimum TGPA specified by the department or a CGPA greater than or equal to 2.00. The minimum TGPA requirement for each department is as follows:

Students who fail to achieve the minimum TGPA required by their department will be required to permanently withdraw from the program with no chance of readmission. In addition, students who have returned to satisfactory standing, but whose CGPA falls below 2.00 in a subsequent term, will be required to permanently withdraw from the program with no chance of readmission.

3.5.7 Repeated Courses

Students who fail to achieve the required results in a course must either repeat it successfully or complete a substitute course approved by their department. For students who fail prerequisite courses which are offered only in the Fall or Winter, the department responsible may, in appropriate cases, arrange "reading courses" during the other term or during the Summer months. Such courses taken during a Fall or Winter term constitute a normal part of the candidate's work load. If the student is on probation, these courses must be included in the workload reduction.

3.5.8 Reassessment and Reread of a Grade

In accordance with the Charter of Student Rights, and subject to the conditions stated therein, students have the right to consult any written submission for which they have received a mark and the right to discuss this submission with the examiner. If, after discussion with the instructor, a student decides to request a formal reread of a final exam, the student must apply in writing, complete the Reread form and submit it to the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office.

The following conditions apply:

- requests for rereads in more than one course per term will not be accepted, unless permission is given by the Faculty of Engineering;

- grades may be either raised or lowered as the result of a reread;

- rereads in courses not in the Faculty of Engineering are subject to the deadlines, rules and regulations of the relevant faculty;

- any request to have term work re-evaluated must be made directly to the instructor concerned.

The deadlines to make an application for a formal reread of a final exam are:
the last working day of March for fall courses,
the last working day of July for winter courses, and
the last working day of November for summer courses.

A $35 fee for each reread will be assessed directly to the student's McGill account if the result remains the same or is lowered. If the grade is increased, no charge is made.

For further information, students may consult the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office.

3.5.9 Examination Regulations

For information regarding examination regulations and procedures 
in the Faculty of Engineering, please refer to the Engineering 
Website at www.mcgill.ca/engineering. 

3.5.10 Supplemental Examinations

Courses administered by the Faculty of Engineering do not have supplemental examinations; however, Engineering students may be eligible to write supplemental examinations in courses administered by the Faculties of Arts and Science (typically Humanities and Social Science courses and freshman (U0) courses.

The following conditions apply:

- students must be in satisfactory or probationary standing; those with an unsatisfactory standing are not permitted to write supplementals;

- students are permitted to write a supplemental for courses in which they have received a mark of D, F, J or U;

- students must write the supplemental exam at the time of the next supplemental examination period;

- special permission of the Associate Dean (Student Affairs), Engineering, is required if a student wishes to write supplemental exams totaling more than seven (7) credits.

- only one supplemental examination is allowed in a course;

- the supplemental result may or may not include the same proportion of class work as did the original grade. The instructor will announce the arrangements to be used for the course by the end of the course change period;

- the supplemental result will not erase the grade originally obtained; both the original mark and the supplemental result will be calculated in the CGPA;

- additional credit will not be given for a supplemental exam where the original grade for the course was a D and the student already received credit for the course.

The supplemental examination period for Fall courses is during the months of April and May, and for Winter courses and courses spanning Fall/Winter during the last week of August. It is the student's responsibility to find out the date and time of the supplemental exam. Supplemental exam applications are available from the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office. Alternately, students may print out the Supplemental Examination Request Form from the Faculty Website and return it by mail or submit it to the Student Affairs Office.

The deadline for submission of applications is March 1 for Fall courses and July 15 for Winter courses and courses spanning Fall/Winter terms.

There is a $35 non-refundable fee per each supplemental exam, which is charged directly to the student's McGill student account.

Students should consult the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office for more information.

3.5.11 Deferred Examinations

Students who have missed a final examination due to illness or family affliction must submit the following documentation to the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office, Room 378, Macdonald Building:

Students must also attest that they have completed all course work up to date, which will be verified with the instructor(s). The Student Affairs Office must be informed of the reasons for absences from final examination no later than one week after the date of the final examination that was missed.

A student's signature on the Deferral Request Form will allow the Faculty to verify the authenticity of the medical certificate and the nature of the illness, or any other documentation provided. If the form is not signed, it will result in the assignment of a J grade in the course.

If a student becomes ill during a formal examination, he/she must inform the invigilator as soon as possible. If necessary, the student will be escorted to the Health Services. As stated above, the student must return to the Faculty of Engineering Student Affairs Office with medical certification within one week of the exam. IMPORTANT: If a student completes the exam in routine fashion, the grade received CANNOT be changed.

Students are advised that deferrals are granted ONLY for compelling reasons. If the request for deferral is denied by the Associate Dean (Student Affairs) the student will receive a "J" grade (absent) in the course. For the purpose of calculating GPAs and CGPAs, the grade of "J" is treated as an "F" (failed, 0%). Students will be contacted regarding the approval of a deferral initially via e-mail approximately two weeks after the end of examination period. A formal letter will be mailed at a later date.

Students granted a deferral will be given an "L" grade which will be replaced by a "J" should the students miss the next deferred or regular examination in the course, whichever occurs first. Students are to ONLY write the final examination but NOT redo or resubmit course material. If they wish to resubmit assignments and/or rewrite quizzes, class tests and/or mid-terms, they must appeal to the Associate Dean, Student Affairs.

If a deferral is granted, the maximum number of courses that a student may register for will be limited to ensure that no more than 18 credits of course work are to be satisfied in a single term or no more than 6 exams are to be written, whichever is greater. This will provide a student with sufficient time during the term and the exam period to properly prepare for deferred examinations.

For Engineering and Management courses, students granted a deferral MUST write the final exam the NEXT time it is offered. Students should be aware that a deferred examination might not be available until the next time the course is given (one year or longer).

For Arts and Science courses, students MUST write the supplemental examination offered during either May (for Fall courses) or August (for Winter courses). Consult the Calendar of Dates for the dates set for supplemental exams, and the supplemental examination schedule posted on the Web for the exact date and time of a specific exam. Please note, deferrals are not permitted for summer courses. Students may be permitted to withdraw from a course without refund instead.

For Continuing Education courses, students granted a deferral should contact the Centre for Continuing Education directly for more information.

For further information, refer to Deferred Examinations.

4 Academic Programs

The curricula described in the following pages, and the courses listed under Faculty of Engineering, see page 476, have been approved for the 2004-05 session, but the Faculty reserves the right to introduce changes as may be deemed necessary or desirable.

4.1 School of Architecture

Macdonald-Harrington Building, Room 201
815 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2K6 
Telephone: (514) 398-6700
Fax: (514) 398-7372
Website: www.mcgill.ca/architecture 
Director
David Covo
Emeritus Professors
Harold Spence-Sales; A.A.Dipl., M.R.T.P.I., F.C.I.P.
Radoslav Zuk; B.Arch.(McG.), M.Arch.(M.I.T.), D.Sc. (Ukr.Acad.Art), F.R.A.I.C., F.R.S.A., F.A.R.C., O.A.Q., O.A.A.
Professors
Bruce Anderson; B.Arch.(McG.), M.Arch.(Harv.), F.R.A.I.C., O.A.Q.
Vikram Bhatt; N.Dip.Arch.(Ahmedabad), M.Arch.(McG.), M.R.A.I.C.
Derek Drummond; B.Arch.(McG.), F.R.A.I.C., O.A.A. (William C. Macdonald Professor of Architecture)
Avi Friedman; B.Arch.(Technion), M.Arch.(McG.), Ph.D.(Montr.), O.A.Q., I.A.A.
Alberto Pérez-Gómez; Dipl.Eng.(Nat.Pol.Inst.Mexico), M.A., Ph.D.(Essex) (Saidye Rosner Bronfman Professor of Architectural History)
Adrian Sheppard; B.Arch.(McG.), M.Arch.(Yale), F.R.A.I.C., O.A.Q., A.A.P.P.Q.
Associate Professors
Annmarie Adams; B.A.(McG.), M.Arch., Ph.D.(Berkeley), M.R.A.I.C. (William Dawson Scholar)
Martin Bressani; B.Sc.(Arch.), B.Arch.(McG.), M.Sc.Arch., Diplomes des études approfondies, Docteur de l'Université de Paris-Sorbonne(Paris IV)
Ricardo Castro; B.Arch.(Los Andes), M.Arch., M.A.(Art History) (Ore.) M.R.A.I.C.
David Covo; B.Sc.(Arch.), B.Arch.(McG.), F.R.A.I.C., O.A.Q.
Robert Mellin; B.Arch., M.Sc.(Arch.)(Penn.State), M.Arch.(McG.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(U.Penn.), M.R.A.I.C., N.A.A.
Pieter Sijpkes; B.Sc.(Arch.), B.Arch.(McG.)
Faculty Lecturer
Julia Bourke
Course Lecturers
Manon Asselin, Jean D'Aragon, Lisa Landrum, Nadia Meratla, Carlos Rueda Plata, David Theodore
Adjunct Professors
Cécile Baird, Ewa Bieniecka, Lawrence Bird, Michael Carroll, Nathalie David, Howard Davies, Georges Drolet, Gordon Edwards, François Émond, Julia Gersovitz, Nan Griffiths, Dan Hanganu, Pierre Jampen, Richard Klopp, Phyllis Lambert, Seymour Levine, Anna Mainella, Harry Mayerovitch, Sybil McKenna, Serge Melanson, Rosanne Moss, Carl Mulvey, Joanna Nash, Harry Parnass, Louise Pelletier, Mark Poddubiuk, Louis Pretty, Daniella Rohan, Richard Russell, Robert Stanley, Sheila Theophanides, Samson Yip, Jozef Zorko
Research Associates
Jim Donaldson, Rafik Salama
Associate Members
Clarence Epstein, Tania Martin, Irena Murray, Howard Shubert
Visiting Critics and Lecturers
Each year visitors are involved in the teaching of certain courses as lecturers and critics. These visitors change from year to year; in 2003, they were:
Gavin Affleck, Bruce Allan, Steve Badanes, Jean Beaudoin, Thierry Beaudoin, Bruce Bolton, Raouf Boutros, Louis Brillant, Frank Carter, Mathieu Casavant, Roch Cayouette, Yvan Cazabon, Stephane Chevalier, Lily Chi, Ella Chmielewska, Rob Claiborne, Henri Cleinge, Anne Cormier, Renee Daoust, Janine Debanne, Georges Drolet, Frederic Dube, Andre Dupras, Wade Eide, Andrew Forster, Marco Frascari, Mark J. Ginocchio, Bob Hamilton, Dan Hanganu, Pat Harrop, Michael Hoeschen, Mario Iannuzzi, Robert Jutra, Rob Kastelic, Alan Knight, Anick La Bissonniere, Lucie Lafontaine, Katherine Lapierre, Michel Langevin, Francois Lemoine, David Letherbarow, Marie-Paule Macdonald, Robert Magne, Louis Martin, Paula Meijerink, Hilary Sample Meredith, Marc Neveu, Steve Parcell, Claude Pasquin, Juliette Patterson, Danny Pearl, Cameron Petkau, Celine Poisson, Patrick Quinn, Anna Radici, Jacques Rousseau, Patricia Sarrazin-Sullivan, Gilles Saucier, Murray Schafer, John Schnier, Anik Schooner, Tom Schweitzer, Steve Smith, Sudhir Suri, Georges Teyssot, Pierre Thibault, Eric Turcotte, Betsy Williamson, Shane Williamson.

ARCHITECTURAL CERTIFICATION IN CANADA

In Canada, all provincial associations recommend a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit Canadian professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes two types of accredited degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture and the Master of Architecture. A program may be granted a five-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on its degree of conformance, with established educational standards.

Masters degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, which, when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

Since all provincial associations in Canada recommend any applicant for licensure to have graduated from a CACB-accredited program, obtaining such a degree is an essential aspect of preparing for the professional practice of architecture. While graduation from a CACB-accredited program does not assure registration, the accrediting process is intended to verify that each accredited program substantially meets those standards that, as a whole, comprise an appropriate education for an architect.

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

McGill's professional program in architecture is structured as a four and a half year, or nine-term, course of study divided into two parts.

The first part, for students entering with the Diploma of Collegial Studies in Pure and Applied Science or the equivalent, is a six-term design program leading to a non-professional degree, Bachelor of Science (Architecture). [Most students from outside Quebec are admitted to an eight-term B.Sc.(Arch.) program and enter a first year which includes courses outlined in section 3.1.3 "Architecture - Basic Science Requirements for Students Entering from Outside Quebec".]

The second part, for students with the B.Sc.(Arch.) degree, is a one and a half year, or three-term, program leading to the professional Master of Architecture I degree. The professional M.Arch.I is accredited by the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB), and is recognized as accredited by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) in the USA.

Students in the B.Sc.(Arch.) program who intend to proceed to the professional degree must satisfy certain minimum requirements including:

Further information on the professional M.Arch.I program is 
available on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/architecture. 

Student Exchanges

A limited number of qualified students may participate in an exchange with Schools of Architecture at other universities which have agreements with the McGill School of Architecture, for a maximum of one term in the second year of the B.Sc.(Arch.) program. These include: Facultad de Arquitectura, Universidad de Los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia; Istituto Universitario di Architettura di Venezia, Venice, Italy; Fakultät für Raumplanung und Architektur, Technische Universität Wien, Vienna, Austria; The Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Institut Supérieur d'Architecture, Saint-Luc Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium; École d'architecture de Grenoble, Grenoble, France; École d'architecture Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand, France; Facolta di Architettura Civile Politecnico di Milano (Boviso); Virgina Polytechnic Institute and State University, Faculty of Architecture; Alexandria Centre for Architecture and Urban Studies (M.Arch. only), Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Arquitectura; Technologico de Monterrey (Campus Queretero), Departamento de Arquitectura; University of Florida, School of Architecture.

ANCILLARY ACADEMIC FACILITIES

Laboratories and Workshops

Architectural Workshops - David Speller, Technician.

Communications Laboratory, including Photo Lab - Carrie Henzie, Media Technician.

Computers in Architecture Laboratory and the Apple Design and Modeling Centre - Professors Robert Mellin and Richard Russell.

Building Science Resource Centre - Dr. Avi Friedman.

Library

Blackader-Lauterman Library of Architecture and Art, located in the Redpath Library - Marilyn Berger.

Collections

Visual Resources Collection, including slides, film, video and other materials - Dr. Annmarie Adams.

Canadian Architecture Collection, housed in the Blackader-Lauterman Library - Irena Murray.

Orson Wheeler Architectural Model Collection - Professor Pieter Sijpkes.

Materials Resource Centre - Dr. Avi Friedman.

CURRICULUM FOR THE B.Sc.(Arch.) DEGREE
REQUIRED COURSES
COURSE CREDIT
Non-Departmental Subjects
   
CIVE 205
Statics
3
 
CIVE 283
Strength of Materials
4
 
CIVE 385*
Structural Steel and Timber Design
3
 
CIVE 388*
Foundations and Concrete Design
3
 
CIVE 492*
Structures
2
 
FACC 220
Law for Architects and Engineers
3
18
* Candidates intending not to proceed to the M.Arch. I degree may substitute other courses of equal total weight for any of these.
   
Architectural Subjects
   
ARCH 201
Communication, Behaviour and Architecture
6
 
ARCH 202
Architectural Graphics and Design Elements
6
 
ARCH 217
Freehand Drawing 1
1
 
ARCH 218
Freehand Drawing 2
1
 
ARCH 240
Organization of Materials in Building
3
 
ARCH 250
Architectural History 1
3
 
ARCH 251
Architectural History 2
3
 
ARCH 303
Design and Construction 1
6
 
ARCH 304
Design and Construction 2
6
 
ARCH 321
Freehand Drawing 3
1
 
ARCH 322
Freehand Drawing 4
1
 
ARCH 324
Sketching School 1
1
 
ARCH 354
Architectural History 3
3
 
ARCH 355
Architectural History 4
3
 
ARCH 375
Landscape
2
 
ARCH 377
Energy, Environment and Buildings
2
 
ARCH 405
Design and Construction 3
6
 
ARCH 406
Design and Construction 4
6
 
ARCH 447
Electrical Services
2
 
ARCH 451
Building Regulations and Safety
2
64
COMPLEMENTARY COURSES
 
12
Students must complete 12 credits of architectural complementaries which must include at least one course from each of the areas of concentration listed below in order to qualify for the B.Sc.(Arch.) degree.
   

A. History
B. Theory
C. Environmental
Design
D. Technics
ARCH 372
ARCH 352
ARCH 350
ARCH 318
ARCH 379
ARCH 363
ARCH 378
ARCH 319
ARCH 388
ARCH 383
ARCH 379
ARCH 377
ARCH 522
ARCH 524
ARCH 520
ARCH 461
ARCH 523
ARCH 525
ARCH 521
ARCH 471
ARCH 528
ARCH 529
ARCH 527
ARCH 490
ARCH 531
 
OCC1 442
ARCH 512
ARCH 532
   
ARCH 526
ARCH 533
     
ARCH 534
     

OUTSIDE ELECTIVES
 
3
3 credits must be completed outside the School of Architecture, subject to approval by the Student Advisor.
___
TOTAL CREDITS
 
97

Architectural Complementaries
ARCH 252
(3)
Introduction to Architectural History 1
ARCH 253
(3)
Introduction to Architectural History 2
ARCH 318
(3)
Design Sketching
ARCH 319
(3)
The Camera and Perception
ARCH 350
(3)
The Material Culture of Canada
ARCH 352
(3)
Art and Theory of House Design
ARCH 363
(2)
Structure,Organization and Form
ARCH 364
(2)
Architectural Modeling
ARCH 372
(2)
History of Architecture in Canada
ARCH 377
(2)
Energy, Environment and Buildings
ARCH 378
(3)
Site Usage
ARCH 379
(4)
Summer Course Abroad
ARCH 383
(3)
Geometry/Architecture/Environment
ARCH 388
(2)
Introduction to Historic Preservation
ARCH 461
(1)
Freehand Drawing and Sketching
ARCH 471
(2)
Computer-Aided Building Design
ARCH 490
(2)
Selected Topics in Design
ARCH 512
(3)
Architectural Modelling
ARCH 520
(3)
Montreal: Urban Morphology
ARCH 521
(3)
Structure of Cities
ARCH 522
(3)
History of Domestic Architecture in Quebec
ARCH 523
(3)
Significant Texts and Buildings
ARCH 524
(3)
Seminar on Architectural Criticism
ARCH 525
(3)
Seminar on Analysis and Theory
ARCH 526
(3)
Philosophy of Structure
ARCH 527
(3)
Civic Design
ARCH 528
(3)
History of Housing
ARCH 529
(3)
Housing Theory
ARCH 531
(3)
Architectural Intentions Vitruvius - Renaissance
ARCH 532
(3)
Origins of Modern Architecture
ARCH 533
(3)
New Approaches to Architectural History
ARCH 534
(3)
Architectural Archives
ARCH 540
(3)
Selected Topics in Architecture 1
ARCH 541
(3)
Selected Topics in Architecture 2
OCC1 442
(2)
Enabling Environments

4.2 Department of Chemical Engineering

M.H. Wong Building, Room 3060
3610 University Street
Montreal, QC  H3A 2B2 
Telephone: (514) 398-4494
Fax: (514) 398-6678
Website: www.mcgill.ca/chemeng 
Chair
Richard J. Munz
Post-Retirement
J.-M. Charrier; Dipl.Ing., E.N. S.A.M.(Paris), M.S.,Ph.D.(Akron), Ing.
W.J. Murray Douglas; B.Sc.(Qu.), M.S.E., Ph.D.(Mich.)
Professors
David G. Cooper; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
John M. Dealy; B.S.(Kansas), M.S.E., Ph.D.(Mich.), Eng.
Musa R. Kamal; B.S.(Ill.) M.S., Ph.D.(Carnegie Mellon), Eng.
Richard J. Munz; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc.(Wat.), Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
Alejandro D. Rey; B.Ch.Eng.(CCNY), Ph.D.(Berkeley) (James McGill Professor)
Juan H. Vera; B.Mat.(Chile), Ing.Quim.(U.T.E.), M.S.(Berkeley), Dr.Ing.(Santa Maria), Ing.
Bohumil Volesky; M.Sc.(Czech. Tech. Univ.), Ph.D.(W.Ont.)
Martin E. Weber; B.S.E.(Prin.), Sc.D.(M.I.T.), P.Eng.
Associate Professors
Dimitrios Berk; B.Sc.(Bosphorus), M.E.Sc.(W.Ont.), Ph.D.(Calg.), P.Eng.
Jean-Luc Meunier; Dipl. Ing., EPFL(Lausanne), M.Sc., Ph.D., INRS(Varennes), Ing.
Assistant Professors
Sylvain Coulombe; B.Sc., M.Eng.(Sherb.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Reghan James Hill; B.Eng., Ph.D.(Cornell)
Richard L. Leask; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc. (Wat.), Ph.D.(Tor.)
Corey Leclerc; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Minnesota)
Milan Maric; B.Sc.(McMaster), B.Eng.& Mgmt(McMaster), Ph.D.(Minnesota)
Sasha Omanovic; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Zagreb)
Phillip Servio; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Minnesota)
PAPRICAN Adjunct Professor
George J. Kubes; B.Eng., M.Eng.(Prague), Ph.D.(Bratislava)
Adjunct Professors
Pierre Bisaillon, Wayne Brown, Peter Csakany, Mario Davidovsky, Serge Guiot, David J. McKeagan, Carlos Miguez, Patrice Nadeau, Norman Peters, Bassam Sarkis, Jana Simandl, Roger C. Urquhart, Paula Wood-Adams.

The central purpose of engineering is to pursue solutions to technological problems in order to satisfy the needs and desires of society. Chemical engineers are trained to solve the kinds of problems that are typically found in the "chemical process industries", which include the chemical manufacturing, plastics, water treatment, pulp and paper, petroleum refining, ceramics, and paint industries as well as substantial portions of the food processing, textile, nuclear energy, biochemical and pharmaceutical industries. The technological problems and opportunities in these industries are often closely linked to social, economic and environmental concerns. For this reason, practitioners of chemical engineering often deal with these questions when they are working in management, pollution abatement, product development, marketing and equipment design.

The discipline of chemical engineering is distinctive in being based equally on physics, mathematics and chemistry. Application of these three fundamental sciences is basic to a quantitative understanding of the process industries. Those with an interest in the fourth major science, biology, will find several courses in the chemical engineering curriculum which integrate aspects of the biological sciences relevant to process industries such as food processing, fermentation and water pollution control. Courses on the technical operations and economics of the process industries are added to this foundation. The core curriculum concludes with process design courses taught by practicing design engineers. Problem-solving, experimenting, planning and communication skills are emphasized in courses throughout the core curriculum.

By means of complementary courses, students can also obtain further depth in technical areas and breadth in non-technical subjects. Some students elect to complete a minor in biotechnology, management, materials engineering, computer science, environmental engineering or chemistry.

The solution to many environmental problems requires an understanding of technological principles. A chemical engineering degree provides an ideal background. In addition to relevant material learned in the core program, a selection of environmental complementary courses and minor programs is available. The involvement of many chemical engineering staff members in environmental research provides the opportunity for undergraduate students to carry out research projects in this area.

The curriculum also provides the preparation necessary to undertake postgraduate studies leading to the M.Eng. or Ph.D. degrees in chemical engineering. Students completing this curriculum acquire a broad, balanced education in the natural sciences with the accent on application. Thus, for those who do not continue in chemical engineering, it provides an exceptionally balanced education in applied science. For others, it will form the basis of an educational program that may continue with a variety of studies such as business administration, medicine or law. Versatility is, then, one of the most valuable characteristics of the graduate of the chemical engineering program.

ACADEMIC PROGRAM

For those who have completed the Quebec CEGEP-level program in Pure and Applied Sciences, the Chemical Engineering Program comprises 111 credits as outlined below. Certain students who take advantage of summer session courses can complete the departmental programs in three calendar years. Students who have passed Chemistry 202 or 302 at the CEGEP level may be exempt from course CHEM 212 or CHEM 234, respectively (Introductory Organic Chemistry 1 and Selected Topics in Organic Chemistry), the corresponding courses are transferred from required courses to electives.

For appropriately qualified high school graduates from outside Quebec, an extended credit program is available, as described in section 3.1.2 "Basic Science Requirements for Students Entering from Outside Quebec".

In some cases students from university science disciplines have sufficient credits to complete the requirements for the B.Eng. (Chemical) program in two years. Those concerned should discuss this with their advisor.

Students must obtain a C grade or better in all core courses. For the Department of Chemical Engineering, core courses include all required courses (departmental and non-departmental) as well as complementary courses (departmental). A grade of "D" is a passing grade in other complementary courses and in any elective courses taken.

CURRICULUM FOR THE B.ENG. DEGREE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
REQUIRED COURSES
COURSE CREDIT
Non-Departmental Courses
   
CHEM 212
Introductory Organic Chemistry 1
4
 
CHEM 233
Topics in Physical Chemistry
3
 
CHEM 234
Topics in Organic Chemistry
3
 
COMP 208
Computers in Engineering
3
 
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
3
 
MATH 263
Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
3
 
MATH 264
Advanced Calculus
3
 
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
2
 
MIME 310
Engineering Economy
3
27
Chemical Engineering Courses
   
CHEE 200
Introduction to Chemical Engineering
4
 
CHEE 204
Chemical Manufacturing Processes
3
 
CHEE 220
Chemical EngineeringThermodynamics
3
 
CHEE 291
Instrumental Measurements Laboratory
4
 
CHEE 314
Fluid Mechanics
4
 
CHEE 315
Heat and Mass Transfer
4
 
CHEE 340
Process Modelling
3
 
CHEE 351
Separation Processes
3
 
CHEE 360
Technical Paper 1
1
 
CHEE 370
Elements of Biotechnology
3
 
CHEE 380
Materials Science
3
 
CHEE 392
Project Laboratory 1
4
 
CHEE 393
Project Laboratory 2
5
 
CHEE 423
Chemical Reaction Engineering
4
 
CHEE 453
Process Design
4
 
CHEE 455
Process Control
4
 
CHEE 456
Design Project 1
1
 
CHEE 457
Design Project 2
5
 
CHEE 462
Technical Paper 2
1
 
CHEE 474
Biochemical Engineering
3
 
CHEE 484
Materials Engineering
3
69
COMPLEMENTARY COURSES
   
Courses to be selected from those approved by the Department (see list of technical complementaries below)
 
9
Two courses (6 credits), selected from an approved list: one course on the impact of technology on society and one in the humanities and social sciences, administrative studies and law. See section 3.4 "Complementary Studies" for further information.
 
6
TOTAL
   
111

For students starting their B.Eng. studies in September who have completed the Quebec Diploma of Collegial Studies, a program for the first two terms of study is given below:

Term 1
 
Credits
CHEE 200
Introduction to Chemical Engineering
4
 
CHEE 291
Instrumental Measurement Laboratory
4
 
CHEM 212
Introductory Organic Chemistry 1
4
 
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
3
 
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
2
17
Term 2
   
CHEE 204
Chemical Manufacturing Processes
3
 
CHEE 220
Chemical EngineeringThermodynamics
3
 
CHEM 234
Topics in Organic Chemistry
3
 
COMP 208
Computers in Engineering
3
 
MATH 263
Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
3
15

Students entering their second year of study or who are starting in January must plan their program of studies in consultation with their Departmental advisor.

Additional information can be found on the Faculty Website at www.mcgill.ca/engineering, as well as in section 3.1.2 "Basic Science Requirements for Students Entering from Outside Quebec".

TECHNICAL COMPLEMENTARIES

A minimum of 9 credits of complementary courses must be chosen from a list of technical complementaries approved by the Department. The purpose of this requirement is to provide students with an area of specialization within the broad field of chemical engineering. Alternatively, some students use the technical complementaries to increase the breadth of their chemical engineering training.

At least two (2) technical complementary courses are to be selected from those offered by the Department (list below). Permission is given to take the third complementary course from other suitable undergraduate courses in the Faculty of Engineering.

The Technical Complementary courses currently approved by the Department are as follows::

BIOT 505
Selected Topics in Biotechnology
(Biotechnology Minor students only)
CHEE 363
Projects Chemical Engineering 1
CHEE 438
Engineering Princples in Pulp and Paper Processes
CHEE 452
Particulate Systems
CHEE 458
Computer Applications
CHEE 464
Projects in Chemical Engineering 2
CHEE 471
Industrial Water Pollution Control (or CIVE 430)
CHEE 472
Industrial Air Pollution Control (or MECH 534)
CHEE 481
Polymer Engineering
CHEE 487
Chemical Processing Electronics Industry
CHEE 489
Electrochemical Engineering
CHEE 494
Research Project and Seminar
CHEE 495
Research Project and Seminar
CHEE 571
Small Computer Applications: Chemical Engineering
CHEE 581
Polymer Composites Engineering

Courses CHEE 481 and CHEE 581 comprise a Polymeric Materials sequence. Additional courses in this area are available in the Chemistry Department (e.g., CHEM 455) or at the graduate level (CHEE 681 to CHEE 684). The Department has considerable expertise in the polymer area.

Courses CHEE 370 and CHEE 474 make up a sequence in Biochemical Engineering-Biotechnology. Students interested in this area may take additional courses, particularly those offered by the Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and courses in biochemistry and microbiology. The food, beverage and pharmaceutical industries are large industries in the Montreal area and these courses are relevant to these industries and to the new high technology applications of biotechnology.

The third area in which there is a sequence of courses is Pollution Control. The Department offers two courses in this area: CHEE 471 and CHEE 472. As some water pollution control problems are solved by microbial processes, course CHEE 474 is also relevant to the pollution control area. Likewise as the solution to pollution problems frequently involves removal of particulate matter from gaseous or liquid streams, course CHEE 452 is also relevant. Additional courses in this area are listed under section 5.7 "Environmental Engineering Minor".

A Minor in Biotechnology is also offered in the Faculties of Engineering and of Science with emphasis on Molecular Biology and Chemical Engineering Processes. A full description of the program appears in section 5.2 "Biotechnology Minor".

Note that many of the technical complementaries are offered only in alternate years. Students should, therefore, plan their complementaries as far ahead as possible. With the approval of the instructor and academic advisor, students may also take graduate (CHEE 500- level) courses as technical complementaries.

ELECTIVE COURSES

Students who have obtained exemptions for courses, i.e., for CEGEP courses equivalent to CHEM 212 or CHEM 234, or who take more than the minimum requirements for the degree, may choose university-level courses in any field. Approval of an elective course requires only that no timetable conflicts are created and that it not be a repetition of material already covered in the curriculum or already mastered by the student.

CURRICULUM COMMITTEE

The Curriculum Committee is composed of three students, elected by their classes, and two staff members. This Committee provides a forum for all matters involving undergraduate student/staff interactions. While the primary concern is with matters of curriculum and courses (their content, evaluation, scheduling, etc.), the Committee has also taken up a number of other matters in recent years, e.g., working space, facilities (equipment and libraries), etc.

CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

The Chemical Engineering Student Society has for many years been affiliated both with the CSChE (Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering) and with the AIChE (American Institute of Chemical Engineers). For a nominal fee students receive Canadian Chemical News, a monthly publication, and the AlChE Student Members Bulletin as well as other privileges of student membership in the two societies. The student chapter also organizes a series of local social, educational and sporting events. For example, recent events have included student-professor banquets and Christmas parties, dances, speakers, broomball games and joint meetings with the Montreal Section of the CSChE. The latter gives students a chance to mix with practising chemical engineers.

4.3 Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Macdonald Engineering Building, Room 492
817 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2K6 
Telephone: (514) 398-6860
Fax: (514) 398-7361
Website: www.mcgill.ca/civil 
Chair
Denis Mitchell
Emeritus Professors
Philip J. Harris; B.Sc.(Man.), M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), F.E.I.C., F.C.S.C.E., Eng.
Richard G. Redwood; B.Sc.(Eng.)(Bristol), M.A.Sc.(Tor.), Ph.D.(Bristol), F.C.S.C.E., F.I.Struct.Eng., Eng.
Stuart B. Savage; B.Eng.(McG.), M.S.Eng.(Cal.Tech.), Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.S.C.
Professors
Vincent H. Chu; B.S.Eng.(Taiwan), M.A.Sc.(Tor.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.), Eng.
M. Saeed Mirza; B.Eng.(Karachi), M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), F.A.C.I., F.E.I.C., F.C.S.C.E., Hon. F.I.E.P., Eng.
Denis Mitchell; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.), F.A.C.I., F.C.A.E., F.C.S.C.E., Eng. (William Scott Professor of Civil Engineering)
Van-Thanh-Van Nguyen; B.M.E.(Vietnam), M.C.E.(A.I.T.), D.A.Sc.(Montr.), Eng.
A. Patrick S. Selvadurai; M.S.(Stan.), Ph.D., D.Sc.(Nottingham), F.E.I.C., F.I.M.A., F.C.S.C.E., P.Eng.
Suresh C. Shrivastava; B.Sc.(Eng.) (Vikram), M.C.E.(Del.), Sc.D.(Col.), Eng.
Associate Professors
Luc E. Chouinard; B.Ing., M.Ing.(Montr.), B.C.L.(McG.), Sc.D.(M.I.T.), Eng.
Susan J. Gaskin; B.Sc.(Queen's), Ph.D.(Canterbury)
Subhasis Ghoshal; B.C.E. (Jadavpur), M.S.(Missouri), Ph.D.(Carnegie Mellon)
Ronald Gehr; B.Sc.(Eng.)(Rand), M.A.Sc.,Ph.D.(Tor.), P.Eng.
Ghyslaine McClure; B.Ing.(Montr.), S.M.C.E.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(Montr.), Eng.
James Nicell; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Windsor), P.Eng. (William Dawson Scholar)
Yixin Shao; B.S., M.S.(Tongji), Ph.D.(Northwestern)
Assistant Professors
Murtaza Haider; B.Sc.(Peshawar), M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.) (joint appoint. with School of Urban Planning)
Colin Rogers; B.A.Sc.(Waterloo), M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Sydney), P.Eng.
Adjunct Professors
Sofia Babarutsi, Jean Pierre Desmarais, Serge Guiot, John Hadjinicolaou, Jalal Hawari, Paul Henshaw, Graham Holder, Emmanuel Le Colletter, Zoubir Lounis, Pierre Lundahl, Kenneth MacKenzie, Charles Manatakos, Thanh Son Nguyen, Paul Rodrigue, Sandro Scola, William Taylor, Jan Vrana, Monica Wagner, Ronald Zaloum

Civil engineers have traditionally applied scientific and engineering knowledge to the task of providing the built environment, from its conception and planning to its design, construction, maintenance and rehabilitation. Examples include buildings, bridges, roads, railways, dams, and facilities for water supply and treatment, and waste disposal. With the aging and deterioration of an already vast infrastructure, its maintenance and rehabilitation has become an increasingly important role of the civil engineering profession. Also, with worldwide concern about the detrimental impact of human activities on the environment, civil engineers are now in the forefront of developing and providing the means for both prevention and remediation of many aspects of environmental pollution.

The program in Civil Engineering is comprehensive in providing the fundamentals in mechanics and engineering associated with the diverse fields of the profession, in offering choices of specialization, and in fully reflecting the advances in science, mathematics, engineering and computing that have transformed all fields of engineering in recent years. The resulting knowledge and training enables graduates to not only enter the profession thoroughly well prepared, but also to adapt to further change.

The required courses ensure a sound scientific and analytical basis for professional studies through courses in solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, soil mechanics, environmental engineering, water resources management, structural analysis, systems analysis and mathematics. Fundamental concepts are applied to various fields of practice in both required and complementary courses.

By a suitable choice of complementary courses, students can attain advanced levels of technical knowledge in the specialized areas mentioned above. Alternatively, students may choose to develop their interests in a more general way by combining complementary courses within the Department with several from other departments or faculties.

Students who wish to extend their knowledge in certain areas beyond the range that the program complementary courses allow, can also take a Minor program. Minors are available in fields such as Arts, Economics, Management, Environmental Engineering, and Construction Engineering and Management. These require additional credits to be taken from a specified list of topics relating to the chosen field. Further information on the various Minor programs may be found in section 5 "Minor Programs and Choice of Electives or Complementary Courses". Details of how the Minors can be accommodated within the Civil Engineering program will be made available at the time of preregistration counselling.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

Considerable freedom exists for students to influence the nature of the program of study which they follow in the Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics. A variety of advanced complementary courses is offered in five main groupings:
Environmental Engineering, Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Structural Engineering, and Transportation Engineering.

Guidance on the sequence in which required core courses should be taken is provided for students in the form of a sample program which covers the entire period of study. The technical complementary courses selected, usually in the last two terms of the program, will depend upon the student's interests. All students must meet with their advisor each term to confirm the courses for which they are registered.

Courses taken in Term 3 or later will depend on a student's interests and ability. Information and advice concerning different possibilities are made available in the Department prior to registration. All programs require the approval of a staff advisor. Programs for students transferring into the Department with advanced standing will be dependent upon the academic credit previously achieved, and such a program will be established only after consultation with a staff advisor.

--------------------------------START OF REVISION----------------
CURRICULUM FOR THE B.ENG. DEGREE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING
REQUIRED COURSES
COURSE CREDIT
Non-departmental courses
   
COMP 208
Computers in Engineering
3
 
EDEC 206
Communication in Engineering
3
 
EPSC 221
General Geology
3
 
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
3
 
MATH 263
Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
3
 
MATH 264
Advanced Calculus
3
 
MECH 261
Measurement Laboratory
2
 
MECH 290
Graphics 2
3
 
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
2
 
MIME 310
Engineering Economy
3
28
Departmental courses
   
CIVE 202
Construction Materials
4
 
CIVE 205
Statics
3
 
CIVE 206
Dynamics
3
 
CIVE 207
Solid Mechanics
4
 
CIVE 208
Civil Engineering Systems Analysis
3
 
CIVE 210
Surveying
2
 
CIVE 225
Environmental Engineering
4
 
CIVE 290
Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer
3
 
CIVE 302
Probabilistic Systems
3
 
CIVE 311
Geotechnical Mechanics
4
 
CIVE 317
Structural Engineering 1
3
 
CIVE 318
Structural Engineering 2
3
 
CIVE 319
Transportation Engineering
3
 
CIVE 320
Numerical Methods
4
 
CIVE 323
Hydrology and Water Resources
3
 
CIVE 324
Construction Project Management
3
 
CIVE 327
Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics 1
4
 
CIVE 418
Design Project
3
 
CIVE 432
Technical Paper
1
60
COMPLEMENTARY COURSES
   
A minimum of six credits to be selected from list (a) and the remaining nine credits to be selected from lists (a) or (b) or from other suitable undergraduate or 500-level courses.
15

(a) Design Technical Complementaries
   
CIVE 416
(3)
Geotechnical Engineering
   
CIVE 421
(3)
Municipal Systems
   
CIVE 428
(3)
Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering
   
CIVE 430
(3)
Water Treatment and Pollution Control
 
CIVE 462
(3)
Design of Steel Structures
   
CIVE 463
(3)
Design of Concrete Structures
   
(b) General Technical Complementaries
   
CIVE 433
(3)
Urban Planning
   
CIVE 440
(3)
Traffic Engineering
   
CIVE 446
(3)
Construction Engineering
   
CIVE 451
(3)
Geoenvironmental Engineering
   
CIVE 460
(3)
Matrix Structural Analysis
   
CIVE 470
(3)
Research Project
   
CIVE 512
(3)
Advanced Civil Engineering Materials
 
CIVE 514
(3)
Structural Mechanics
   
CIVE 526
(3)
Solid Waste Management
   
CIVE 527
(3)
Renovation and Preservation: Infrastructure
   
CIVE 540
(3)
Urban Transportation Planning
   
CIVE 541
(3)
Rail Engineering
   
CIVE 550
(3)
Water Resources Management
   
CIVE 553
(3)
Stream Pollution and Control
   
CIVE 555
(3)
Environmental Data Analysis
   
CIVE 570
(3)
Waves and Coastal Engineering
   
CIVE 572
(3)
Computational Hydraulics
   
CIVE 573
(3)
Hydraulic Structures
   
CIVE 574
(3)
Fluid Mechanics of Water Pollution
   
CIVE 576
(3)
Hydrodynamics
   
CIVE 577
(3)
River Engineering
   
CIVE 579
(3)
Water Power Engineering
   
CIVE 585
(3)
Groundwater Hydrology
   
CIVE 586
(3)
Earthwork Engineering
   
CIVE 587
(3)
Pavement Design
   

Two courses (6 credits), selected from an approved list: one course on the impact of technology on society and one in the humanities and social sciences, administrative studies and law. See section 3.4 "Complementary Studies" for further information.
6
TOTAL CREDITS
 
109

--------------------------------END OF REVISION ------------------------

4.4 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering 
Undergraduate Programs Office 
Lorne Trottier Building, Room 2060 
3630 University Street  
Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 
Telephone: (514) 398-3943
Fax: (514) 398-4653
Website: www.ece.mcgill.ca 
Chair
David A. Lowther
Associate Chair, Undergraduate Affairs
Jonathan P. Webb
Associate Chair, Graduate Affairs
Benoit Champagne
Emeritus Professors
Eric L. Adler; B.Sc.(Lond.), M.A.Sc.(Tor.), Ph.D.(McG.), F.I.E.E.E., Eng.
Pierre R. Bélanger; B.Eng.(McG.), S.M., Ph.D.(M.I.T.), F.I.E.E.E., Eng.
Maier L. Blostein; B.Eng., M.Eng.(McG.), Ph.D.(Ill.), F.I.E.E.E., Eng.
Gerry W. Farnell; B.A.Sc.(Tor.), S.M.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(McG.), F.I.E.E.E., Eng.
Tomas J.F. Pavlasek; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
Nicholas C. Rumin; B.Eng., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
Post-Retirement
Clifford H. Champness; M.Sc.(Lond.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Professors
Peter E. Caines; B.A.(Oxon.), D.I.C. Ph.D.(Lond.), F.R.S.C., F.I.E.E.E., F.C.I.A.R. (James McGill Professor) and (Macdonald Professor)
Frank D. Galiana; B.Eng.(McG.), S.M., Ph.D.(M.I.T.), F.I.E.E.E., Eng.
Geza Joos; B.Sc.(C'dia), M.Eng. Ph.D.(McG.)
Peter Kabal; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Tho Le-Ngoc; M.Eng.(McG.), Ph.D.(Ott.), F.I.E.E.E.
Harry Leib; B.Sc.(Technion), Ph.D.(Tor.)
Martin D. Levine; B.Eng., M.Eng.(McG.), Ph.D.(Lond.), F.C.I.A.R., F.I.E.E.E., Eng.
David A. Lowther; B.Sc.(Lond.), Ph.D.(C.N.A.A.), F.C.A.E., Eng.
Boon-Teck Ooi; B.E.(Adel.), S.M.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
Gordon Roberts; B.A.Sc.(Wat.), M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.), Eng., F.I.E.E.E. (James McGill Professor)
Jonathan Webb; B.A., Ph.D.(Cantab.)
Associate Professors
Benoit Champagne; B.Eng., M.Eng.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Tor.)
James Clark; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Br.Col.)
Jeremy R. Cooperstock; A.Sc.(U.B.C.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Frank Ferrie; B.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Vincent Hayward; Dip.d'Ing.(ENSM, Nantes), Doc.Ing.(Orsay), Eng.
Steve McFee; B.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Hanna Michalska; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Warsaw), Ph.D.(Lond.)
David V. Plant; M.S., Ph.D.(Brown) (James McGill Professor)
Richard Rose; B.Sc.,M.S.(Illinois), Ph.D.(GIT)
Ishiang Shih; M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Assistant Professors
Ramesh Abhari; M.A.Sc.,(Tehran),Ph.D(Tor.)
Tal Arbel; M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Jan Bajcsy; B.Sc.(Harv.), M.Eng., Ph.D.(Prin.)
Benoit Boulet; B.Sc.(Laval), M.Eng.(McG.) Ph.D.(Tor.) (William Dawson Scholar)
Lawrence Chen, B.Eng.(McG.), M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Mark Coates; B.Eng.(Australia), Ph.D.(Cambridge)
Mourad El-Gamal; B.Sc.(Cairo), M.Sc.(Nashville), Ph.D.(McG.)
Dennis Giannacopoulos; M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Warren Gross; B.A.Sc. (Wat.), M.A.Sc.,Ph.D. (Tor.)
Anas Hamoui; M.Eng. (McGill),Ph.D.(Tor.)
Roni Khazaka; M.Eng.,Ph.D.(Carlton)
Andrew Kirk; B.Sc.(Brist.), Ph.D.(London) (William Dawson Scholar)
Fabrice Labeau, M.S., Ph.D.(Louvain)
Shie Mannor ; B.A.,B.Sc.,Ph.D.(Haifa)
Milica Popovich; B.Sc.(Colo.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Northwestern)
Ioannis Psaromiligkos; B.Sc.(Patras), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Buffalo)
Zilic Zeljko; B.Eng.(Zagreb), M.S.c, Ph.D.(Tor.)
Visiting Professor
Lorne Mason; B.Eng., Ph.D.(Sask.)
Lecturers
Kenneth L. Fraser; B.Eng., M.Eng.(McG.)
Danny Grant; M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Donglin Ma; M.Eng.,(Beijing), Ph.D.(McG.)
Richard Vickers; B.Sc.(Wales)
Associate Members
Martin Buehler; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Yale)
Philipe Depalle; D.E.A.(Le Mans & ENS Cachan, Ph.D.(Le Mans & IRCAM)
Gregory Dudek; B.Sc.(Queen's), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Alan C. Evans; M.Sc.(Surrey), Ph.D.(Leeds)
William R. Funnell; M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Henrietta L. Galiana; M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Jean Gotman; M.E.(Dartmouth, N.S.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Robert E. Kearney; M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Bernard Segal; B.Sc., B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Adjunct Professors
Ray Bartnikas, Eduard Cerny, Charalambos Charalambous, Philippe Depalle, Robert DiRaddo, Cedric Guss, Maurice Huneault, Cheng K. Jen, Alexandre Jouan, Michael Kaplan, Karim Khordoc, Irene Leszkowicz, Miguel Marin, Donald McGillis, Radu Negulescu, Douglas O'Shaughnessy, Norbert Puetz, Farouk Rizk, Robert Sabourin, Ian Sinclair, Lucjan Wegrowicz.

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers undergraduate degree programs in Electrical Engineering, Electrical Engineering (Honours), Computer Engineering, and Software Engineering. All programs provide students with a strong background in mathematics, basic sciences, engineering science, engineering design and complementary studies, in conformity with the requirements of the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB).

The program in Electrical Engineering gives students a broad understanding of the key principles that are responsible for the extraordinary advances in the technology of computers, micro-electronics, automation and robotics, telecommunications and power systems. These areas are critical to the development of our industries and, more generally, to our economy. A graduate of this program is exposed to all basic elements of electrical engineering and can function in any of our client industries. This breadth is what distinguishes an engineer from, say, a computer scientist or physicist.

The program in Electrical Engineering (Honours) is designed for students who wish to pursue postgraduate work and look to a career in advanced research and development. The technical complementaries are selected from graduate courses, facilitating the transition to postgraduate studies. Students in this curriculum benefit from smaller classes and have more contact with professorial staff and graduate students. However, the program is quite demanding. Students are expected to register for at least 14 credits per term; they may register for a smaller number only with the permission of the Chair of this Department. Students in the Honours program must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.00. Those who fail to maintain this standard are transferred to the regular program.

The program in Computer Engineering provides students with greater depth and breadth of knowledge in the hardware and software aspects of computers. Students are exposed to both theoretical and practical issues of both hardware and software in well-equipped laboratories. Although the program is designed to meet the growing demands by industry for engineers with a strong background in modern computer technology, it also provides the underlying depth for graduate studies in all fields of Computer Engineering.

The Department, jointly with the School of Computer Science, offers a Bachelor of Software Engineering program*. Graduates of this program should be eligible for accreditation (once accreditation standards for Software Engineers have been adopted). This program offers students the opportunity to focus their studies on the skills needed to design and develop complex software systems. This emerging field of engineering is a major component of the growing Information Technology (IT) sector of the economy, in which the demand for qualified personnel continues to outstrip supply. Graduates of this program will have a solid foundation for careers in the software industry. [*The School of Computer Science offers a B.Sc. Major program in Software Engineering, which will not lead to accreditation. For further information on the B.Sc. program see Computer Science (COMP).]

In addition to technical complementary courses, students in all three programs take general complementary courses in social sciences, administrative studies and humanities. These courses allow students to develop specific interests in areas such as psychology, economics, management or political science.

Entry into the Honours Program

The Honours program is a limited enrolment program and entry is highly competitive. There is no direct entry to the Honours program in the first year. Students may enter the Honours program in the following ways:

- Students from CEGEP will be admitted, on the basis of their grades, at the start of the third term.

- Students from outside Quebec will be admitted, on the basis of their grades, at the start of the fifth term.

Though not required to do so, students in the Honours program or wishing to enter the Honours program are encouraged to take the following advanced math and physics courses:

MATH 325
Ordinary Differential Equations
instead of MATH 261
MATH 247
Linear Algebra
instead of MATH 270
MATH 248
Advanced Calculus 1
instead of MATH 265
MATH 249
Advanced Calculus 2
instead of MATH 381
PHYS 251
Classical Mechanics 1
instead of CIVE 281

To remain in the Honours program and to be awarded the Honours degree, a student must have completed at least 14 credits in each term since entering Electrical and Computer Engineering, except for the final two terms of their degree, and maintained a CGPA of at least 3.00 since entering Electrical and Computer Engineering. In either of their final two full terms (i.e., Fall and Winter, or Winter and Fall) students may drop below 14 credits, provided the combined load for the two terms is at least 16 credits. For more information, please contact the Departmental office at (514) 398-7344.

--------------------------------START OF REVISION----------------
CURRICULUM FOR THE B.ENG. DEGREE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (HONOURS)
REQUIRED COURSES
COURSE CREDIT
Non-Departmental Courses
   
COMP 202
Introduction to Computing 1
3
 
EDEC 206
Communication in Engineering
3
 
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
3
 
MATH 247*
Linear Algebra
3
 
or MATH 271
Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations (3)
   
MATH 248*
Advanced Calculus 1
3
 
or MATH 264
Advanced Calculus (3)
   
MATH 249
Advanced Calculus 2
3
 
or MATH 381
Complex Variables and Transforms (3)
   
MATH 325
Ordinary Differential Equations
3
 
or MATH 263
Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra (3)
   
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
2
 
MIME 310
Engineering Economy
3
 
PHYS 251
Classical Mechanics 1
3
 
or CIVE 281
Analytical Mechanics (3)
   
PHYS 271
Quantum Physics
3
32
* CGPA of 3.30 is required to register for MATH 247 and MATH 248.
   
Departmental Courses
   
ECSE 200
Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering
3
 
ECSE 210
Circuit Analysis
3
 
ECSE 221
Introduction to Computer Engineering
3
 
ECSE 291
Electrical Measurements Laboratory
2
 
ECSE 303
Signals and Systems 1
3
 
ECSE 304
Signals and Systems 2
3
 
ECSE 305
Probability and Random Sig. 1
3
 
ECSE 322
Computer Engineering
3
 
ECSE 323
Digital System Design
5
 
ECSE 330
Introduction to Electronics
3
 
ECSE 334
Introduction to Microelectronics
5
 
ECSE 351
Electromagnetic Fields
3
 
ECSE 352
EM Waves and Optics
3
 
ECSE 361
Power Engineering
3
 
ECSE 498
Honours Thesis 1
3
 
ECSE 499
Honours Thesis 2
3
51
COMPLEMENTARY COURSES
   
Technical Complementaries
 
15
Five technical complementary courses (15 credits), which must be ECSE courses at the 500 level (or ECSE 427, ECSE 451). Students must choose their technical complementary courses so that they complete at least 9 credits in one of the following specializations. However, with Departmental approval, the Honours Thesis 1 and 2 (ECSE 498 and ECSE 499) can count as 6 of the 9 credits. The remaining courses may be any at the 500 level offered by the Department. The choice is not restricted.
 
Computer Systems Technology
   
ECSE 427
Operating Systems
   
ECSE 525
Computer Architecture
   
ECSE 532
Computer Graphics
   
ECSE 548
Introduction to VLSI Systems
   
Control and Automation
   
ECSE 501
Linear Systems
   
ECSE 502
Control Engineering
   
ECSE 503
Linear Stochastic Systems 1
   
ECSE 504
Computer Control
   
ECSE 505
Nonlinear Control Systems
   
ECSE 507
Optimization and Optimal Control
   
ECSE 509
Probability and Random Sig. 2
   
ECSE 512
Digital Signal Processing 1
   
ECSE 529
Image Processing and Communication
   
ECSE 531
Real Time Systems
   
Integrated Circuits and Electronics
   
ECSE 451
EM Transmission & Radiation
   
ECSE 522
Asynchronous Circuits and Systems
   
ECSE 527
Optical Engineering
   
ECSE 530
Logic Synthesis
   
ECSE 533
Physical Basis of Semiconductor Devices
 
ECSE 534
Analog Microelectronics
   
ECSE 536
RF Microelectronics
   
ECSE 545
Microelectronics Technology
   
ECSE 548
Introduction to VLSI Systems
   
ECSE 571
Optoelectronic Devices
   
ECSE 573
Microwave Electronics
   
Power Engineering
   
ECSE 502
Control Engineering
   
ECSE 549
Expert Systems in Electrical Design
   
ECSE 559
Flexible AC Transmission Systems
   
ECSE 560
Power Systems Analysis 2
   
ECSE 563
Power Systems Operation and Planning
 
ECSE 565
Introduction to Power Electronics
   
Telecommunications
   
ECSE 451
EM Transmission and Radiation
   
ECSE 509
Probability and Random Sig. 2
   
ECSE 511
Introduction to Digital Communication
   
ECSE 512
Digital Signal Processing 1
   
ECSE 521
Digital Communications 1
   
ECSE 523
Speech Communications
   
ECSE 527
Optical Engineering
   
ECSE 528
Telecommunication Network Architecture
 
ECSE 571
Optoelectronic Devices
   
ECSE 596
Optical Waveguides
   
Laboratory Complementaries
 
4
Two of the following eleven 400-level laboratory courses:
 
ECSE 426
Microprocessor Systems
   
ECSE 431
Introduction to VSLI CAD
   
ECSE 435
Mixed-Signal Test Techniques
   
ECSE 485
IC Fabrication Laboratory
   
ECSE 486
Power Laboratory
   
ECSE 487
Computer Architecture Laboratory
   
ECSE 488
High Frequency Laboratory
   
ECSE 490
Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
   
ECSE 491
Communication Systems Laboratory
   
ECSE 492
Optical Communications Laboratory
   
ECSE 493
Control and Robotics Laboratory
   
General Complementaries
 
6
Two courses (6 credits), selected from an approved list: one course on the impact of technology on society and one in the humanities and social sciences, administrative studies and law. See section 3.4 "Complementary Studies" for further information.
 
TOTAL CREDITS
 
108
--------------------------------END OF REVISION ------------------------
--------------------------------START OF REVISION----------------
CURRICULUM FOR THE B.ENG. DEGREE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (REGULAR)
REQUIRED COURSES
COURSE CREDIT
Non-Departmental Courses
   
CIVE 281
Analytical Mechanics
3
 
or PHYS 251
Classical Mechanics 1 (3)
   
COMP 202
Introduction to Computing 1
3
 
EDEC 206
Communication in Engineering
3
 
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
3
 
MATH 263
Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
3
 
or MATH 325
Ordinary Differential Equations (3)
   
MATH 264
Advanced Calculus
3
 
or MATH 248*
Advanced Calculus 1 (3)
   
MATH 271
Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations
3
 
or MATH 247*
Linear Algebra (3)
   
MATH 381
Complex Variables and Transforms
3
 
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
2
 
MIME 310
Engineering Economy
3
 
PHYS 271
Quantum Physics
3
32
* CGPA of 3.30 is required to register for MATH 247 and MATH 248.
   
Departmental Courses
   
ECSE 200
Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering
3
 
ECSE 210
Circuit Analysis
3
 
ECSE 221
Introduction to Computer Engineering
3
 
ECSE 291
Electrical Measurements Laboratory
2
 
ECSE 303
Signals and Systems 1
3
 
ECSE 304
Signals and Systems 2
3
 
ECSE 305
Probability and Random Sig. 1
3
 
ECSE 322
Computer Engineering
3
 
ECSE 323
Digital System Design
5
 
ECSE 330
Introduction to Electronics
3
 
ECSE 334
Introduction to Microelectronics
5
 
ECSE 351
Electromagnetic Fields
3
 
ECSE 352
EM Waves and Optics
3
 
ECSE 361
Power Engineering
3
 
ECSE 494
Electrical Engineering Design Project
3
48
COMPLEMENTARY COURSES
   
Technical Complementaries
 
18
Six courses (18 credits) from the list of 400-level courses in Electrical Engineering that must include 9 credits (3 courses) from one of the areas of specialization listed below:
   
Computer Systems Technology
   
ECSE 424
Human-Computer Interaction
   
ECSE 425
Computer Organization and Architecture
 
ECSE 427
Operating Systems
   
Control and Automation
   
ECSE 404
Control Systems
   
ECSE 412
Discrete Time Signal Processing
   
ECSE 426
Microprocessor Systems
   
Integrated Circuits and Electronics
   
ECSE 425
Computer Organization and Architecture
 
ECSE 431
Introduction to VSLI CAD
   
ECSE 432
Physical Basis: Transistor Devices
   
ECSE 435
Mixed-Signal Test Techniques
   
ECSE 451
EM Transmission & Radiation
   
Phototonics
   
ECSE 423
Fundamentals of Photonics
   
ECSE 430
Photonic Devices and Systems
 
ECSE 432
Physical Basis: Transistor Devices
   
Power Engineering*
   
ECSE 404
Control Systems
   
ECSE 460
Appareillage électrique (Electrical Power Equipment)
ECSE 462
Electromechanical Energy Conversion
 
ECSE 464
Power System Analysis 1
   
ECSE 465
Power Electronic Systems
   
ECSE 468
Electricité industrielle (Industrial Power Systems)
Telecommunications**
   
ECSE 411
Communications Systems 1
   
ECSE 414
Introduction to Telecommunication Networks
 
and any one of the following:
   
ECSE 412
Discrete Time Signal Processing
   
ECSE 413
Communications Systems 2
   
ECSE 423
Fundamentals of Photonics
   
ECSE 451
EM Transmission and Radiation
 
Laboratory Complementaries
 
4
Two of the following eleven 400-level laboratory courses:
 
ECSE 426
Microprocessor Systems
   
ECSE 431
Introduction to VSLI CAD
   
ECSE 435
Mixed-Signal Test Techniques
   
ECSE 485
IC Fabrication Laboratory
   
ECSE 486
Power Laboratory
   
ECSE 487
Computer Architecture Laboratory
   
ECSE 488
High Frequency Laboratory
   
ECSE 489
Telecommunication Network Lab
   
ECSE 490
Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
   
ECSE 491
Communication Systems Laboratory
   
ECSE 492
Optical Communications Laboratory
   
ECSE 493
Control and Robotics Laboratory
   
General Complementaries
 
6
Two courses (6 credits), selected from an approved list: one course on the impact of technology on society and one in the humanities and social sciences, administrative studies and law. See section 3.4 "Complementary Studies" for further information.
 
TOTAL CREDITS
 
108
--------------------------------END OF REVISION ------------------------

* Enhanced Power Concentration

The Institute for Electrical Power Engineering was recently established as a province-wide centre for electrical power engineering education. It is funded by industry, mostly Hydro-Quebec, and provides a comprehensive program and state-of-the-art laboratory facilities, and a point of contact between industry and universities involved in power engineering.

This program is open to students in the regular Electrical Engineering program only.

The benefits of the Concentration are:

- a complete and up-to-date final year program in electrical power engineering, with industry-sponsored and supported courses;

- access to industry-sponsored projects, internships and new employment opportunities.

Eligibility criteria:

to be considered in September 2004, the applicant must:

- be registered in the B.Eng. program (regular Electrical Engineering);

- have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.70;

- have completed or be registered in ECSE 361 (Power Engineering);

- be able to complete the degree requirements by Spring 2005;

- agree to follow the curriculum requirements set out below.

Selection criteria:

The number of students selected, expected to be between 5 and 10, will be the subject of a specific agreement between the University and the Institute. Selection criteria to the Institute will be based on CGPA and on the curriculum vitae. The selection process for the scholarship may involve an interview with the committee presided by Hydro-Quebec. There is a possibility of an internship with Hydro-Quebec.

Curriculum requirements for selected students:

Generally, unless the University has authorized specific substitutions, students must complete the degree requirements set out in the 2004-05 Undergraduate Programs Calendar with the following specifications:

Technical Electives and Laboratories:
All students must take (or have taken) the following courses (18 credits):
ECSE 404
Control Systems
ECSE 460
Appareillage électrique (Electrical Power Equipment)
ECSE 462
Electromechanical Energy Conversion
ECSE 464
Power Systems Analysis 1
ECSE 465
Power Electronic Systems
ECSE 468
Electricité industrielle (Industrial Power Systems)
Courses ECSE 460 and ECSE 468 are taught in French. ECSE 460, ECSE 464, ECSE 465 and ECSE 468 are courses sponsored by the Institute and taught at École Polytechnique de Montréal.
In addition, students must complete ECSE 494 (Electrical Engineering Design Project) on a practical project in power engineering, preferably at the Institute or with a company sponsoring the Institute.

** Enhanced ITT Specialization in Telecommunications

The International Institute of Telecommunications (IIT) was established in Montreal as a centre for telecommunications education. Funded by government and industry, it provides state-of-the-art laboratory facilities and a point of contact between local telecommunications industries and universities.

This progam is open to students in the regular Electrical Engineering program only.

The benefits of the specialization are:

- a guaranteed project lab (ECSE 494) in telecommunications, at IIT or with an IIT company; and

- permission to take ECSE 496 at IIT.

To complete the specialization, students must take six courses as Technical Complementaries:

ECSE 411
Communications Systems 1
ECSE 414
Introduction to Telecommunication Networks
ECSE 496
Telecommuniations Systems and Services
and any three courses selected from the following list:
ECSE 412
Discrete Time Signal Processing
ECSE 413
Communications Systems 2
ECSE 423
Fundamentals of Photonics
ECSE 451
EM Transmission and Radiation

In addition, students must take ECSE 491 (Communications Systems Lab) and complete ECSE 494 (Electrical Engineering Design Project) in telecommunications, at IIT or with an IIT company.

There may be an enrolment limitation in this specialization in any given term.

CURRICULUM FOR THE B.ENG. DEGREE IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING
REQUIRED COURSES
COURSE CREDIT
Non-Departmental Courses
   
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
3
 
MATH 263
Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
3
 
or MATH 325
Ordinary Differential Equations (3)
   
MATH 264
Advanced Calculus
3
 
or MATH 248*
Advanced Calculus 1 (3)
   
MATH 270
Applied Linear Algebra
3
 
or MATH 247*
Linear Algebra (3)
   
MATH 363
Discrete Mathematics
3
 
MATH 381
Complex Variables and Transforms
3
 
CIVE 281
Analytical Mechanics
3
 
or PHYS 251
Classical Mechanics 1 (3)
   
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
2
 
MIME 310
Engineering Economy
3
 
COMP 202
Introduction to Computing 1
3
 
COMP 250
Introduction to Computer Science
3
 
COMP 302
Programming Languages and Paradigms
3
 
EDEC 206
Communication in Engineering
3
38
* CGPA of 3.30 is required to register for MATH 247 and MATH 248.
   
Departmental Courses
   
ECSE 200
Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering
3
 
ECSE 210
Circuit Analysis
3
 
ECSE 221
Introduction to Computer Engineering
3
 
ECSE 291
Electrical Measurements Laboratory
2
 
ECSE 303
Signals and Systems 1
3
 
ECSE 304
Signals and Systems 2
3
 
ECSE 305
Probability and Random Sig. 1
3
 
ECSE 321
Introduction to Software Engineering
3
 
ECSE 322
Computer Engineering
3
 
ECSE 323
Digital System Design
5
 
ECSE 330
Introduction to Electronics
3
 
ECSE 334
Introduction to Microelectronics
5
 
ECSE 353
Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
3
 
ECSE 425
Computer Organization and Architecture
3
 
ECSE 427
Operating Systems
3
 
ECSE 494
Electrical Engineering Design Project
3
51
COMPLEMENTARY COURSES
   
Technical Complementaries
 
9
Three courses (9 credits) selected from:
   
ECSE 404
Control Systems
   
ECSE 411
Communications Systems 1
   
ECSE 412
Discrete Time Signal Processing
   
ECSE 414
Introduction to Telecommunication Networks
 
or COMP 535
Computer Networks 1
   
ECSE 424
Human-Computer Interaction
   
ECSE 426
Microprocessor Systems
   
ECSE 428
Software Engineering Practice
   
ECSE 431
Introduction to VSLI CAD
   
ECSE 530
Logic Synthesis
   
ECSE 526
Artificial Intelligence
   
ECSE 531
Real Time Systems
   
ECSE 532
Computer Graphics
   
ECSE 548
Introduction to VLSI Systems
   
COMP 420
Files and Databases
   
COMP 431
Algorithms for Engineers
   
COMP 575
Fundamentals of Distributed Algorithms
 
Laboratory Complementaries
 
4
Two of the following 400-level laboratory courses:
 
ECSE 426
Microprocessor Systems
   
ECSE 431
Introduction to VSLI CAD
   
ECSE 435
Mixed-Signal Test Techniques
   
ECSE 487
Computer Architecture Laboratory
   
ECSE 489
Telecommunication Network Lab
   
ECSE 490
Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
   
ECSE 491
Communication Systems Laboratory
   
ECSE 493
Control and Robotics Laboratory
   
General Complementaries
 
6
Two courses (6 credits), selected from an approved list: one course on the impact of technology on society and one in the humanities and social sciences, administrative studies and law. See section 3.4 "Complementary Studies" for further information.
___
TOTAL CREDITS
 
108
CURRICULUM FOR THE BACHELOR OF SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (B.S.E.)
REQUIRED COURSES
COURSE CREDIT
COMP 202
Introduction to Computing 1
3
 
COMP 206
Introduction to Software Systems
3
 
COMP 250
Introduction to Computer Science
3
 
COMP 251
Data Structures and Algorithms
3
 
COMP 302
Programming Languages and Paradigms
3
 
COMP 330
Theoretical Aspects: Computer Science
3
 
COMP 360
Algorithm Design Techniques
3
 
COMP 361
Systems Development Project
3
 
COMP 420
Files and Databases
3
 
ECSE 221
Introduction to Computer Engineering
3
 
ECSE 321
Introduction to Software Engineering
3
 
ECSE 322
Computer Engineering
3
 
ECSE 427
Operating Systems
3
 
ECSE 428
Software Engineering Practice
3
 
ECSE 429
Software Validation
3
 
ECSE 495
Software Engineering Design Project
3
 
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
3
 
MATH 263
Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
3
 
MATH 264
Advanced Calculus
3
 
MATH 270
Applied Linear Algebra
3
 
MATH 363
Discrete Mathematics
3
 
MATH 381
Complex Variables and Transforms
3
66
Engineering Breadth Required Courses
   
ECSE 200
Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering
3
 
ECSE 210
Circuit Analysis
3
 
ECSE 291
Electrical Measurements Laboratory
2
 
ECSE 303
Signals and Systems 1
3
 
ECSE 305
Probability and Random Sig. 1
3
 
ECSE 330
Introduction to Electronics
3
 
EDEC 206
Communication in Engineering
3
 
MIME 310
Engineering Economy
3
 
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
2
25
Technical Complementaries
11 - 12
Students must take 11-12 credits of technical complementaries from the following list, of which at least 6 credits must be taken from list A and the remainder from list B.
   
Group A Technical Complementaries
   
COMP 350
Numerical Computing
   
COMP 409
Concurrent Programming
   
COMP 424
Topics: Artificial Intelligence 1
   
COMP 433
Personal Software Engineering
   
COMP 524
Theoretical Foundations of Programming Languages
   
COMP 575
Fundamentals of Distributed Algorithms
 
Group B Technical Complementaries
   
ECSE 304
Signals and Systems 2
   
ECSE 323
Digital Systems Design
   
ECSE 404
Control Systems
   
ECSE 411
Communications Systems 1
   
ECSE 412
Discrete Time Signal Processing
   
ECSE 413
Communications Systems 2
   
ECSE 414
Introduction to Telecommunication Networks
 
or COMP 535
Computer Networks 1
   
ECSE 421
Embedded Systems
   
ECSE 422
Fault Tolerant Computing
   
ECSE 420
Parallel Computing
   
ECSE 424
Human-Computer Interaction
   
ECSE 425
Computer Organization and Architecture
 
ECSE 426
Microprocessor Systems
   
or COMP 573
Microcomputers
   
ECSE 504
Computer Control
   
ECSE 522
Asynchronous Circuits and Systems
   
ECSE 526
Artificial Intelligence
   
ECSE 529
Image Processing and Communication
   
ECSE 530
Logic Synthesis
   
ECSE 531
Real Time Systems
   
ECSE 532
Computer Graphics
   
or COMP 557
Fundamentals of Computer Graphics
   
COMP 410
Mobile Computing
   
COMP 412
Software for E-commerce
   
COMP 505
Advanced Computer Architecture
 
COMP 520
Compiler Design
   
COMP 566
Discrete Optimization 1
 
General Complementaries
 
6
Two courses (6 credits), selected from an approved list: one course on the impact of technology on society and one in the humanities and social sciences, administrative studies and law. See section 3.4 "Complementary Studies" for further information.
   
TOTAL CREDITS
108/109

4.5 Department of Mechanical Engineering

Macdonald Engineering Building, Room 351
817 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2K6 
Telephone: (514) 398-6296
Fax: (514) 398-7365
Website: www.mcgill.ca/mecheng 
Chair
Arun K. Misra
Emeritus Professors
Romuald Knystautas; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
Michael P. Paidoussis; B.Eng.(McG.), Ph.D.(Cantab.), Eng., F.I.Mech.E., F.A.S.M.E., F.A.A.M., F.C.S.M.E., F.R.S.C., F.C.A.E. (Thomas Workman Emeritus Professor of Mechanical Engineering)
Post-Retirement
Glen Bach; B.Sc.(Alta.), M.Sc.(Birm.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Lucjan Kops; B.Eng., M.Eng., D.Sc. Eng.(Krakow Tech.U.), Eng., M.C.I.R.P., F.A.S.M.E., F.C.S.M.E., M.S.M.E.
Professors
Abdul M. Ahmed; B.Sc.(Dhaka), M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), Eng. (Thomas Workman Professor of Mechanical Engineering)
Jorge Angeles; B.Eng., M.Eng.(UNAM Mexico), Ph.D.(Stanford), Eng., F.A.S.M.E., F.C.S.M.E. (James McGill Professor), F.R.S.C.
Bantwal R. Baliga; B.Tech.(I.I.T., Kanpur), M.Sc.(Case), Ph.D.(Minnesota)
Wagdi Habashi; B. Eng., M. Eng.(McG.), Ph.D.(Cornell), P. Eng., F.A.S.M.E. (NSERC-Bombardier Industrial Research Chair)
John H.S. Lee; B.Eng.(McG.), M.Sc.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
Dan Mateescu; M.Eng.(Poli.Univ.Buch.), Ph.D.(Rom. Acad. Sci.), Doctor Honoris Causa (Poli.Univ.Buch.), F.C.A.S.I., A.F.A.I.A.A. (Aerospace Program Coordinator)
Arun K. Misra; B.Tech.(I.I.T.,Kharagpur), Ph.D.(U.B.C.), P.Eng.
Martin Ostoja-Starzewski; Eng.(Krakow Tech.U), M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), F.A.S.M.E. (Canada Research Chair)
Stuart J. Price; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Bristol), P.Eng.
Associate Professors
Martin Buehler; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Yale) (William Dawson Scholar)
Luca Cortelezzi; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Caltech)
David L. Frost; B.A.Sc.(U.B.C.), M.S., Ph.D.(Caltech), P.Eng.
Tim Lee; M.S.(Portland State), Ph.D.(Idaho)
Larry B. Lessard; B.Eng.(McG.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Stanford), P.Eng. (Undergraduate Program Coordinator)
Meyer Nahon; B.Sc.(Queen's), M.Sc.(Tor.), Ph.D.(McG.), P.Eng. (Graduate Program Director)
James A. Nemes; B.Sc.(Maryland), M.S., D.Sc.(GWU) (William Dawson Scholar)
Peter Radziszewski; B.Sc.(U.B.C.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Laval)
Inna Sharf; B.A.Sc.,(Tor.), Ph.D.(Tor.), P.Eng.
Vince Thomson; B.Sc.(Windsor), Ph.D.(McMaster) (Werner Graupe Professor of Manufacturing Automation)
Paul J. Zsombor-Murray; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), Eng. F.C.S.M.E.
Assistant Professors
Andrew J. Higgins, B.Sc.(Ill.), M.S., Ph.D.(Wash.)
Pascal Hubert; B.Eng., M.Sc.(École Polytechnique), Ph.D.(U.B.C.), Eng. (Canada Research Chair)
József Kövecses; M.Sc. (U. Miskolc), Ph.D.(Hung. Acad. Sci.), P.Eng.
R. Mongrain; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Ecole Polytechnique), Eng.
Laurent Mydlarski; B.A.Sc.(Waterloo), Ph.D.(Cornell), Eng.
Siva Nadarajah; B.Sc.(Kansas), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Stanford).
Evgeny V. Timofeev; M.Sc., Ph.D.(S.T.U. St. Petersburg).
Srikar T. Vengallatore; B.Tech(B.H.U.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
Laboratory Superintendents
D. Chellan, G. Savard, G. Tewfik
Associate Members
R.E. Kearney; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), Biomedical Engineering Unit
B.H.K. Lee; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
M. Tanzer; M.D., Orthopaedic Surgery
Adjunct Professors
H. Attia, R.G. Edwards, S. Girgis, A. Hemami, Z. Liu, K. Mackenzie, W.D. May, C.A. Rabbath, R. Sumner, G.A. Wagner, T. Yee, D. Zorbas

Mechanical engineers are traditionally concerned with the conception, design, implementation and operation of mechanical systems. Typical fields of work are aerospace, energy, manufacturing, machinery, and transportation. Because of the very broad nature of the discipline there is usually a high demand for mechanical engineers.

Many mechanical engineers follow other career paths. Graduate studies are useful for the specialists working in research establishments, consulting firms or in corporate research and development.

To prepare the mechanical engineer for a wide range of career possibilities, there is a heavy stress in our curriculum on the fundamental analytical disciplines. This is balanced by a sequence of experimental and design engineering courses which include practice in design, manufacture and experimentation. In these courses students learn how to apply their analytical groundwork to the solution of practical problems.

Specialist interests are satisfied by selecting appropriate complementary courses from among those offered with a specific subject concentration, such as management, industrial engineering, computer science, controls and robotics, bio-engineering, aeronautics, combustion, systems engineering, etc.

The Department offers an Honours Program which is particularly suitable for those with a high aptitude in mathematics and physics and which gives a thorough grounding in the basic engineering sciences. The complementary courses in this program can be utilized to take courses with applied engineering orientation, such as those offered in the regular program, or if preferred, to obtain an even more advanced education in engineering science.

Concentrations in Aeronautical Engineering, Mechatronics and Design are available for students in either the Regular or Honours programs who wish to specialize in these areas.

While the program is demanding, there is time for many extra-curricular activities. Students are active in such professional societies as CASI (Canadian Aeronautics and Space Institute), SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers), and ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) and in various campus organizations.

Relations between faculty and students are extremely close. Social functions, at which students and professors meet to exchange views and get to know each other better, are organized frequently.

CURRICULUM FOR THE B.ENG. DEGREE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (REGULAR)
REQUIRED COURSES
COURSE CREDIT
Non-Departmental Subjects
   
CIVE 207
Solid Mechanics
4
 
COMP 208
Computers in Engineering
3
 
ECSE 461
Electric Machinery
3
 
EDEC 206
Communication in Engineering
3
 
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
3
 
MATH 263
Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
3
 
MATH 264
Advanced Calculus
3
 
MATH 271
Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations
3
 
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
2
 
MIME 260
Materials Science and Engineering
3
 
MIME 310
Engineering Economy
3
33
Departmental Courses
   
MECH 201
Introduction to Mechanical Engineering
2
 
MECH 210
Mechanics 1
2
 
MECH 220
Mechanics 2
4
 
MECH 240
Thermodynamics 1
3
 
MECH 260
Machine Tool Laboratory
2
 
MECH 262
Statistics and Measurement Laboratory
3
 
MECH 291
Graphics
3
 
MECH 292
Design 1
3
 
MECH 309
Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering
3
 
MECH 314
Dynamics of Mechanisms
3
 
MECH 315
Mechanics 3
4
 
MECH 321
Mechanics of Deformable Solids
3
 
MECH 331
Fluid Mechanics 1
3
 
MECH 341
Thermodynamics 2
3
 
MECH 346
Heat Transfer
3
 
MECH 362
Mechanical Laboratory 1
2
 
MECH 383
Applied Electronics and Instrumentation
3
 
MECH 393
Design 2
3
 
MECH 412
Dynamics of Systems
3
 
MECH 430
Fluid Mechanics 2
3
 
MECH 463D1
Mechanical Engineering Project
3
 
MECH 463D2
Mechanical Engineering Project
3
64
COMPLEMENTARY COURSES
 
15
2 courses (6 credits) at the 300 level or higher to be selected from Mechanical Engineering. For students who entered in September 2004 or later, one of these two courses must be chosen from the following list:
   
MECH 413
Control Systems
   
MECH 495
Design 3
   
MECH 496
Design 4
   
MECH 497
Value Engineering
   
MECH 524
Computer Integrated Manufacturing
   
MECH 526
Manufacturing and the Environment
   
MECH 528
Product Design
   
MECH 541
Kinematic Synthesis
   
MECH 543
Design with Composite Materials
   
MECH 554
Microprocessors for Mechanical Systems
 
MECH 557
Mechatronic Design
   
MECH 565
Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Equipment
 
MECH 573
Mechanics of Robotic Systems
   
MECH 577
Optimum Design
   
1 course (3 credits) at the 300-level or higher from the Faculty of Engineering or an approved course in the Faculty of Science, including Mathematics.
   
Two courses (6 credits), selected from an approved list: one course on the impact of technology on society and one in the humanities and social sciences, administrative studies and law. See section 3.4 "Complementary Studies" for further information.
   
TOTAL CREDITS
 
112

Students entering in September or January must plan their program of studies in accordance with the regulations posted on the Faculty Website at www.mcgill.ca/engineering. After registering, students must consult with their academic advisor.

Additional information can be found in section 3.1.2 "Basic Science Requirements for Students Entering from Outside Quebec".

CURRICULUM FOR THE B.ENG. DEGREE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (HONOURS)
REQUIRED COURSES
COURSE CREDIT
Non-Departmental Subjects
   
CIVE 207
Solid Mechanics
4
 
EDEC 206
Communication in Engineering
3
 
COMP 208
Computers in Engineering
3
 
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
3
 
MATH 263
Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
3
 
MATH 264
Advanced Calculus
3
 
MATH 271
Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations
3
 
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
2
 
MIME 310
Engineering Economy
3
27
Departmental Courses
   
MECH 201
Introduction to Mechanical Engineering
2
 
MECH 210
Mechanics 1
2
 
MECH 220
Mechanics 2
4
 
MECH 240
Thermodynamics 1
3
 
MECH 260
Machine Tool Laboratory
2
 
MECH 262
Statistics and Measurement Laboratory
3
 
MECH 291
Graphics
3
 
MECH 292
Design 1
3
 
MECH 309
Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering
3
 
MECH 321
Mechanics of Deformable Solids
3
 
MECH 331
Fluid Mechanics 1
3
 
MECH 341
Thermodynamics 2
3
 
MECH 346
Heat Transfer
3
 
MECH 362
Mechanical Laboratory 1
2
 
MECH 383
Applied Electronics and Instrumentation
3
 
MECH 403D1
Thesis (Honours)
3
 
MECH 403D2
Thesis (Honours)
3
 
MECH 404
Honours Thesis 2
3
 
MECH 419
Advanced Mechanics of Systems
4
 
MECH 430
Fluid Mechanics 2
3
 
MECH 452
Mathematical Methods in Engineering 1
3
 
MECH 494
Honours Design Project
3
64
COMPLEMENTARY COURSES
 
21
2 of the following three courses (6 credits):
   
MECH 545
Advanced Stress Analysis
   
MECH 562
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
   
MECH 578
Advanced Thermodynamics
   
2 courses (6 credits) at the 300 level or higher to be selected from Mechanical Engineering. For students who entered in September 2004 or later, one of these two courses must be chosen from the following list:
 
MECH 413
Control Systems
   
MECH 495
Design 3
   
MECH 496
Design 4
   
MECH 497
Value Engineering
   
MECH 524
Computer Integrated Manufacturing
   
MECH 526
Manufacturing and the Environment
   
MECH 528
Product Design
   
MECH 541
Kinematic Synthesis
   
MECH 543
Design with Composite Materials
   
MECH 554
Microprocessors for Mechanical Systems
 
MECH 557
Mechatronic Design
   
MECH 565
Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Equipment
 
MECH 573
Mechanics of Robotic Systems
   
MECH 577
Optimum Design
   
1 course (3 credits) at the 300 level or higher from the Faculty of Engineering or an approved course in the Faculty of Science, including Mathematics.
 
Two courses (6 credits), selected from an approved list: one course on the impact of technology on society and one in the humanities and social sciences, administrative studies and law. See section 3.4 "Complementary Studies" for further information.
 
TOTAL CREDITS
 
112

Students entering in September or January must plan their program of studies in accordance with the regulations posted on the Faculty Website at www.mcgill.ca/engineering. After registering, students must consult with their academic advisor.

Additional information can be found in section 3.1.2 "Basic Science Requirements for Students Entering from Outside Quebec".

LIST OF COMPLEMENTARY COURSES (DEPARTMENTAL)
(Each is 3 credits)

MECH 343
Energy Conversion
MECH 413
Control Systems
MECH 432
Aircraft Structures
MECH 434
Turbomachinery
MECH 447
Combustion
MECH 471
Industrial Engineering
MECH 472
Case Studies in Project Mgmt
MECH 474
Selected Topics in Operations Research
MECH 495
Design 3
MECH 496
Design 4
MECH 497
Value Engineering
MECH 500
Selected Topics in Mechanical Engineering
MECH 501
Special Topics: Mechanical Engineering
MECH 522
Production Systems
MECH 524
Computer Integrated Manufacturing
MECH 526
Manufacturing and the Environment
MECH 528
Product Design
MECH 529
Discrete Manufacturing Systems
MECH 530
Mechanics of Composite Materials
MECH 531
Aeroelasticity
MECH 532
Aircraft Performance, Stability and Control
MECH 533
Subsonic Aerodynamics
MECH 534
Air Pollution Engineering
MECH 537
High-Speed Aerodynamics
MECH 538
Unsteady Aerodynamics
MECH 539
Computational Aerodynamics
MECH 540
Design: Modelling and Decision
MECH 541
Kinematic Synthesis
MECH 542
Spacecraft Dynamics
MECH 543
Design with Composite Materials
MECH 545
Advanced Stress Analysis
MECH 552
Advanced Applied Mathematics
MECH 554
Microprocessors for Mechanical Systems
MECH 555
Applied Process Control
MECH 557
Mechatronic Design
MECH 561
Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Systems
MECH 562
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
MECH 565
Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Equipment
MECH 572
Introduction to Robotics
MECH 573
Mechanics of Robotic Systems
MECH 576
Computer Graphics and Geometrical Modelling
MECH 577
Optimum Design
MECH 578
Advanced Thermodynamics
MECH 581
Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos

TYPICAL PROGRAM OF STUDIES FOR REGULAR OR HONOURS

For students starting their B.Eng. studies in September 2004 who have completed the Quebec Diploma of Collegial Studies, a program for the first two terms of study is given below. Students will be advised by the Department whether they should follow Stream A or Stream B.

STREAM A:
Term 1 (Fall)
COMP 208
Computers in Engineering
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
MECH 201
Introduction to Mechanical Engineering
MECH 210
Mechanics 1
MECH 260
Machine Tool Laboratory
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
Term 2 (Winter)
MATH 263
Differential Equations
MATH 264
Advanced Calculus
MECH 220
Mechanics 2
MECH 262
Statistics and Measurement Laboratory
MECH 291
Graphics
STREAM B:
Term 1 (Fall)
COMP 208
Computers in Engineering
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
MECH 201
Introduction to Mechanical Engineering
MECH 260
Machine Tool Laboratory
MECH 291
Graphics
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
Term 2 (Winter)
MATH 263
Differential Equations
MATH 264
Advanced Calculus
MECH 210
Mechanics 1
MECH 262
Statistics and Measurement Laboratory
MIME 260
Materials Science and Engineering

For all Minors and Concentrations, students should complete a special form available from the Undergraduate Program Secretary indicating their intention to take the Minor or the Concentration.

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING CONCENTRATION

Students in this Concentration should take five courses in the area of Aeronautical Engineering.

Required Courses
(6 credits:
MECH 532
(3)
Aircraft Performance, Stability and Control
MECH 533
(3)
Subsonic Aerodynamics
Complementary Courses
(9 credits)
at least one of the following two courses:
MECH 432
(3)
Aircraft Structures
MECH 434
(3)
Turbomachinery
the remaining two courses may be chosen from the above or from the following courses:
MECH 531
(3)
Aeroelasticity
MECH 537
(3)
High-Speed Aerodynamics
MECH 538
(3)
Unsteady Aerodynamics
MECH 539
(3)
Computational Aerodynamics
MECH 565
(3)
Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Equipment

All courses must be passed at a level C or better.
Students should also discuss the matter with their advisor and complete a special form indicating their intention to take this Concentration.

DESIGN CONCENTRATION

The Design Concentration is comprised of six courses as follows:

MECH 495
Design 3
MECH 496
Design 4
Plus any four below:
MECH 497
Value Engineering
MECH 540
Design: Modelling and Decision
MECH 541
Kinematic Synthesis
MECH 543
Design with Composite Materials
MECH 557
Mechatronic Design
MECH 565
Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Equipment
MECH 576
Computer Graphics and Geometrical Modelling
MECH 577
Optimum Design

MECHATRONICS CONCENTRATION

Students in this Concentration should take six courses in the area of Control, Robotics and/or CAD/CAM. They must take the following four required courses:

MECH 413
Control Systems
MECH 554
Microprocessors for Mechanical Systems
MECH 557
Mechatronic Design
MECH 572
Introduction to Robotics
and two of the following:
MECH 528
Product Design
MECH 541
Kinematic Synthesis
MECH 573
Mechanics of Robotic Systems
MECH 576
Computer Graphics and Geometrical Modelling
ECSE 502
Control Engineering

4.6 Department of Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering

Wong Building, Room 2160
3610 University Street
Montreal, QC  H3A 2B2 
Website: www.mcgill.ca/minmet 
Metals and Materials - 
Telephone: (514) 398-1040		Fax: (514) 398-4492 
Mining - 
Telephone: (514) 398-2215		Fax: (514) 398-7099 
Chair
Robin A.L. Drew
Emeritus Professors
Gordon W. Smith; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
William M. Williams; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Brist.), Ph.D.(Tor.), Eng. (Henry Birks Emeritus Professor of Metallurgy)
Professors
George P. Demopoulos; Dipl. Eng.(NTU Athens), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
Robin A.L. Drew; B.Tech.(Bradford), Ph.D.(Newcastle)
James A. Finch; B.Sc.(Birm.), M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), Eng. (Industry Professor of Mineral Processing)
Raynald Gauvin; B.Ing., Ph.D.(Montr.), Eng.
John E. Gruzleski; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Qu.), Ph.D.(Tor.), Eng. (Gerald G. Hatch Professor of Mining and Metallurgy)
Rod I.L. Guthrie; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Lond.), D.I.C., A.R.S.M., Eng. (William C. Macdonald Professor of Mining and Metallurgy)
Ralph Harris; B.Sc.(Qld), M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Farmaraz (Ferri) P. Hassani; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Nott.), C.Eng.(U.K. Reg.) (George Boyd Webster Professor of Mining Engineering) (Director, Mining Engineering Program)
John J. Jonas; B.Eng.(McG.), Ph.D.(Cantab.), F.A.S.M., Eng. (Henry Birks Professor of Metallurgy)
Hani S. Mitri; B.Sc.(Cairo), M.Eng., Ph.D.(McMaster), Eng.
Jerzy Szpunar; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D., D.Sc.(Krakow)
Steve Yue; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Leeds)
Associate Professors
Michel L. Bilodeau; B.A.Sc.(Montr.), M.Sc.App., Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
Mainul Hasan; B.Eng.(Dhaka), M.Sc.(Dhahran), Ph.D.(McG.)
Janusz A. Kozinski; B.A., M.Eng., D.Sc.(Krakow) (William Dawson Scholar)
André Laplante; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Tor.), Eng.
Frank Mucciardi; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
Jacques Ouellet; B.A.Sc.(Laval), M.A.Sc, Ph.D.(Montr.), Eng.
Faculty Lecturers
John Mossop; B.Eng.(McG.)
Florence Paray; B.Eng.(CSP), M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
Adjunct Professors
Marc Betournay, William Caley, Roussos Dimitrakopoulos, Elhachmi Essadigi, Bryn Harris, Ahmad Hemami, Mohamad Jahazi, Raad Jassim, Joel Kapusta, Eric Lifshin, Martin Pugh, John H. Root, Viwek Vardya, Albert E. Wraith
CO-OP Programs
Director
Frank Mucciardi
Work-term Coordinators

Genevieve Snider (Materials)
Michel Vachon (Mining)

The Department of Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering offers programs leading to the Bachelor of Engineering degree in Materials Engineering or Mining Engineering. In addition to regular courses and laboratories, the curriculum includes seminars, colloquia and student projects reinforced by field trips to industrial operations.

The equipment operated by the Department is the best available. On the materials side there is a full range of laboratory facilities for extractive and process metallurgy as well as excellent materials characterization and processing facilities. In mining engineering the Department has rock engineering laboratories to test the mechanical properties of both rock and backfill materials and computer-aided mine design facilities.

Materials Engineering (CO-OP).

The Materials Engineering degree is a cooperative program leading to a B.Eng. and includes formal industrial work periods. It is built around a strong background of mathematics, basic sciences, computer skills and applications, and specific engineering and design courses to provide up-to-date training in metals/materials engineering. Students take core courses covering processing, fabrication, applications and performance. The program conforms with requirements of the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) and is designed to offer students the best training for employment in Canada's large and vital metallurgical and manufacturing industries. The basic courses are supplemented by complementary courses which provide a good choice of specialties for the graduating engineer. The course structure is reinforced with laboratory exercises. Graduates find employment in a wide range of industries which include the mineral/metal producing and processing sectors, as well as the aerospace and manufacturing industries. Students in the CO-OP program benefit from the practical learning experience arising from work-term employment in meaningful engineering jobs. Students also benefit from the non-tangible learning experience arising from the increased responsibilities required to obtain and successfully complete the work terms.

Mining Engineering (CO-OP).

McGill, which has the oldest mining engineering program in Canada, has always been noted for the excellence of its courses and for the training it provides in mining technology, mineral economics and mining practice. Graduates in mining engineering are in demand not only in Canada but throughout the world. Technical developments have been rapid in recent years. These offer a challenge to the imaginative student with a strong engineering interest. The Department offers a cooperative program leading to the B.Eng. degree in Mining Engineering. The CO-OP program is offered in collaboration with the Département des génies civil, géologique et des mines at École Polytechnique in Montreal, and includes formal industrial work periods. Students registered at McGill are required to take a series of technical mining courses at École Polytechnique in the latter part of the program. These courses are designated as such in the program outline (Subject Code MPMC).

Scholarships

The Department offers Entrance Scholarships each year, valued at $3,000; these scholarships are renewable. A substantial number of other scholarships and bursaries are awarded by the Department as well as by the Canadian Mineral Industry Education Foundation.

Student Advising

Students entering the Mining or Materials Engineering programs must plan their schedule of studies in consultation with one of the departmental advisors: Professors Laplante and Yue (Materials) or Mr. J. Mossop (Mining).

--------------------------------START OF REVISION----------------
CURRICULUM FOR THE B.ENG. DEGREE IN MATERIALS ENGINEERING - CO-OP PROGRAM
REQUIRED COURSES
COURSE CREDITS
Non-Departmental Courses
   
CHEE 481
Polymer Engineering
3
 
CHEM 233
Topics in Physical Chemistry
3
 
CIVE 205
Statics
3
 
CIVE 207
Solid Mechanics
4
 
COMP 208
Computers in Engineering
3
 
MATH 262
Intermediate Calculus
3
 
MATH 263
Ordinary Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
3
 
MATH 264
Advanced Calculus
3
25
Departmental Courses
   
MIME 200
Introduction to the Minerals Industry
3
 
MIME 202
Engineering Communication Skills
2
 
MIME 209
Mathematical Applications
3
 
MIME 212
Engineering Thermodynamics
3
 
MIME 221
Engineering Professional Practice
2
 
MIME 261
Structure of Materials
3
 
MIME 280
Industrial Training 1
2
 
MIME 310
Engineering Economy
3
 
MIME 311
Modelling and Automatic Control
3
 
MIME 317
Analytical and Characterization Techniques
3
 
MIME 337
Electrotechnology
2
 
MIME 341
Introduction to Mineral Processing
3
 
MIME 350
Extractive Metallurgical Engineering
3
 
MIME 352
Hydrochemical Processing
3
 
MIME 356
Heat, Mass and Fluid Flow
4
 
MIME 360
Phase Transformations: Solids
3
 
MIME 362
Mechanical Properties
3
 
MIME 367
Electronic Properties of Materials
3
 
MIME 380
Industrial Training 2
2
 
MIME 442
Modelling and Control: Mineral Processing
3
 
MIME 452
Process and Materials Design
4
 
MIME 455
Advanced Process Engineering
3
 
MIME 456
Steelmaking and Steel Processing
3
 
MIME 465
Ceramic Engineering
3
 
MIME 480
Industrial Training 3
2
71

COMPLEMENTARY COURSES
   
Technical Courses
 
12
9 - 12 credits from the following:
 
CHEE 581
(3)
Polymer Composites Engineering
   
CIVE 512
(3)
Advanced Civil Engineering Materials
 
MECH 530
(3)
Mechanics of Composite Materials
   
MIME 410
(3)
Research Project