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Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies 2004/05


- Academic Units -

1 Agricultural Economics

Department of Agricultural Economics
Macdonald Campus
21,111 Lakeshore Road
Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC  H9X 3V9 
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-7820
Fax: (514) 398-8130
E-mail: agr.econ@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.agrenv.mcgill.ca/agrecon 
Chair
J.C. Henning

1.1 Staff

Assistant Professor
D.K.Y. Mok; B.Math., B.E.S.(Wat.), M.Pl.(W.Ont.), Ph.D.(Tor.)
Associate Professors
L.B.B. Baker; S.D.A., D.C.P.(Edin.), D.F.B.O.M.(Aberd.), M.Sc.(Man.), Ph.D.(McG.)
J.C. Henning; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Guelph)
P.J. Thomassin; B.Sc.(McG.), M.S., Ph.D.(Hawaii)
Faculty Lecturer
M. Savard; B.Sc., M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(UBC)
Adjunct Professor
Joan Marshall

1.2 Programs Offered

The Department of Agricultural Economics offers a program leading to the M.Sc.

It is possible for students to pursue doctoral studies through the Department of Economics with Agricultural Economics as a field of specialization. For specific requirements of that graduate program see the Department of Economics.

1.3 Admission Requirements

M.Sc.

Direct admission to the M.Sc. requires the completion of a B.Sc. in Agricultural Economics or a closely related area, with the equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class-upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program.

The ideal preparation includes courses in agricultural economics, economic theory (intermediate micro and macro), calculus, linear algebra, and statistics. Students with deficiencies in these areas will be required to take additional courses as part of their degree program.

1.4 Application Procedures

Applicants for graduate studies must forward supporting documents to:

Department of Agricultural Economics
Macdonald Campus of McGill University
21,111 Lakeshore
Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC  H9X 3V9
Canada
Telephone: (514) 398-7820
Fax: (514) 398-8130
E-mail: agr.econ@mcgill.ca

Applications will be considered upon receipt of a completed application form, $60 application fee, and the following supporting documents:

Transcripts

- Two official copies of all university level transcripts with proof of degree(s) granted. Transcripts written in a language other than English or French must be accompanied by a certified translation. An explanation of the grading system used by the applicant's university is essential. It is the applicant's responsibility to arrange for transcripts to be sent.

It is desirable to submit a list of the titles of courses taken in the major subject, since transcripts often give code numbers only. Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a Bachelor's degree equivalent to a McGill Honours degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. This implies that about one-third of all undergraduate courses should have been devoted to the subject itself and another third to cognate subjects.

Letters of Recommendation

- Two letters of recommendation on letterhead (official paper) of originating institution or bearing the university seal and with original signatures from two instructors familiar with the applicant's work, preferably in the applicant's area of specialization. It is the applicant's responsibility to arrange for these letters to be sent.

Competency in English

- Non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate degree using the English language are required to submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English, by appropriate exams, e.g., TOEFL (minimum score 570 on the paper-based test or 230 on the computer-based test) or IELTS (minimum 7 overall band). The MCHE is not considered equivalent. Results must be submitted as part of the application. The University code is 0935 (McGill University, Montreal); please use Department code 31(Graduate Schools), Biological Sciences-Agriculture, to ensure that your TOEFL reaches this office without delay.

Graduate Record Exam (GRE)

- The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

DOCUMENTS SUBMITTED WILL NOT BE RETURNED.

Application Fee (non-refundable)

- A fee of $60 Canadian must accompany each application (including McGill students), otherwise it cannot be considered. This sum must be remitted using one of the following methods:

1. Credit card (by completing the appropriate section of the application form). NB: on-line applications must be paid for by credit card.

2. Certified cheque in Cdn.$ drawn on a Canadian bank.

3. Certified cheque in U.S.$ drawn on a U.S. bank.

4. Canadian Money order in Cdn.$.

5. U.S. Money Order in U.S.$.

6. An international draft in Canadian funds drawn on a Canadian bank requested from the applicant's bank in his/her own country.

Deadlines

-Applications, including all supporting documents must reach the department no later than June 1 (March 1 for International) for the Fall Term (September); October 15 (July 1 for International) for the Winter Term (January); February 15 (November 1 for International) for the Summer Term (May). It may be necessary to delay review of the applicant's file until the following admittance period if application materials including supporting documents are received after these dates. International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of the deadline because immigration procedures may be lengthy. Applicants are encouraged to make use of the on-line application form available on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/applying/graduate.

Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application.

Qualifying Students

- Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying Program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying Program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

1.5 Program Requirements

M.Sc. (46 Credits)

A minimum of 19 graduate course credits and the completion of a research thesis (27 credits) are required for the M.Sc. Students may specialize, by way of their research program, in agri-business, development, finance, marketing and trade, policy, and resource and ecological economics.

Specific requirements are as follows:

1.6 Graduate Courses

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.
AGEC 503 Methods of Regional Analysis.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisite: AGEC 200) (Not open to students who have taken GEOG 503) Advanced methods of regional economic analysis including analytical, general equilibrium modeling, regional and multiregional input-output models, spatial interaction modelling and methods used to measure localization and urbanization economies.

AGEC 611 Price Analysis.

(3) (Winter) Topics in advanced microeconomic theory with applications in agricultural economics.

l

AGEC 630 Food and Agricultural Policy.

(3)

AGEC 633 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.

(3) (Fall) An advanced course in the theory and problems of environmental and resource economics and in the analytical techniques used to assess environmental and resource use issues.

AGEC 642 Economics of Agricultural Development.

(3) (Winter) This course focuses on the role of agriculture in economic development. Topics covered will be - development theories, economic efficiency, employment, technology adoption and structural change in developing countries. Also, agriculture, food and development policies and implications for long term planning will be discussed.

AGEC 679 Financing: Alternative Strategies.

(3) (Fall) An in-depth study of the relationship between financing, asset acquisition, tenure, and property rights and obligations for farm businesses. Emphasis will be placed on the potential for the use of non-debt financial instruments such as Community Based Land Trusts (CBLT) and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA).

AGEC 685 Selected Topics in Agricultural Economics.

(3) This course is designed to permit students to explore agricultural economics topics that are not covered in other courses. Students may be asked to prepare a presentation or lead discussion on the selected topic for the benefit of other students and staff. (Pass/Fail grading.)

AGEC 690 Seminar.

(1) This course will focus on current research on economic problems of agriculture through presentations by staff, students and special guests. All graduate students are required to register for this course, and make at least one major presentation.

AGEC 691 M.Sc. Thesis 1.

(6)

AGEC 692 M.Sc. Thesis 2.

(3)

AGEC 693 M.Sc. Thesis 3.

(6)

AGEC 694 M.Sc. Thesis 4.

(6)

AGEC 695 M.Sc. Thesis 5.

(6)

2 Anatomy and Cell Biology

Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
Strathcona Anatomy and Dentistry Building
3640 University Street
Montreal, QC  H3A 2B2
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-6335
Fax: (514) 398-5047
Web site: www.medicine.mcgill.ca/anatomy 
Chair
J.J.M. Bergeron

2.1 Staff

Emeritus Professors
Y. Clermont; B.Sc.(Montr.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
D.G. Osmond; B.Sc., M.B., Ch.B., D.Sc.(Brist.), F.R.S.C.
H. Warshawsky; B.Sc.(Sir G.Wms), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Professors
A. Beaudet*; M.Sc., Ph.D., M.D.(Montr.)
G.C. Bennett; B.A., B.Sc.(Sir. G.Wms.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
J.J.M. Bergeron; B.Sc.(McG.), D.Phil.(Oxon)
J.R. Brawer; B.S.(Tufts), Ph.D.(Harv.)
M. Burnier*; M.D.,M.Sc.,Ph.D.(Brazil)
A. Ribeiro-da-Silva;M.D.,Ph.D(Oporto)
L. Hermo; B.A.(Montr.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
C.P. Leblond; M.D.(Paris), Ph.D.(Montr.), D.Sc.(Sorbonne)
S.C. Miller; B.Sc.(Sir G.Wms.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
C.R. Morales; D.V.M.(Argentina), Ph.D.(McG.)
B. Posner*; M.D.(Man.), Ph.D.(Iowa)
C.E. Smith*; D.D.S., Ph.D.(McG.)
Associate Professors
C. Autexier; B.Sc.(C'dia) Ph.D.(McG.)
P. Barker*; B.Sc.(S.Fraser), Ph.D.(Alta.)
O.W. Blaschuk*; B.Sc.(Winn.), M.Sc.(Man.), Ph.D.(Tor.)
E. Daniels; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Man.)
S. David*; Ph.D.(Man.)
E. Davis; B.Sc., M.Sc.(W.Ont.), Ph.D.(McG.)
T. Kennedy*; B.Sc.(McM.), M.Phil., Ph.D.(Col.)
A. Koromilas*; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Aristotelian U., Greece)
M.F. Lalli; B.S., M.A.(Bowling Green), Ph.D.(McG.)
M. Latterich; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Durham)
M. McKee*; B.Sc.,M.Sc.,Ph.D.(McG.)
P. McPherson*; M.Sc.(Man.), Ph.D.(Iowa)
A. Ribeiro-da-Silva*; M.D., Ph.D.(Oporto)
W. Sossin*; S.B.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(Stan.)
S. Stifani*; Ph.D.(Rome), Ph.D.(Alta.)
H. Vali*; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Munich)
D. Walker*; B.Sc.(Geneva), Ph.D.(Salk), Ph.D.(Geneva)
Assistant Professors
C. Autexier; B.Sc.(C'dia) Ph.D.(McG.)
F. Bedford; B.Sc.(Birm.), Ph.D.(Lond.)
M. Greenwood*; B.Sc.,M.Sc.(C'dia), Ph.D.(McG.)
T. Kennedy*; B.Sc.(McM.), M.Phil., Ph.D.(Col.)
N. Lamarche-Vane; B.Sc.,Ph.D.(Montr.)
C. Mandato, B.Sc., Ph.D.(Wat.)
J.F. Presley; B.A., Ph.D.(Texas)
W. Sossin*; S.B.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(Stan.)
Associate Members
C. Chalk, E. Chevet, C. Cuello, J. Henderson, P. Lasko,A. Leblanc,J. Schrag, P. Seguella, B.Suter, G.Wild
Adjunct Professors
A. Berghius,D. Cyr, M. Desjardins,G. DiBattista,M.Cygler J. Drouin, S. Inoue, M. O'Connor-McCourt A. Nantel, J. Ostermann, P. Metrakos J. Snipes,P. Thibault, D. Thomas

* Denotes cross or joint appointees.

2.2 Programs Offered

Graduate research activities leading to the presentation of the M.Sc. and Ph.D. thesis involve original experimental work in one of the areas being actively investigated by the Department's Research Supervisors. Current research projects include: cell biology of secretion; cell biology of endocytosis; signal transduction of cell receptors for growth factors and hormones; synthesis and migration of glycoproteins; subcomponents of the Golgi apparatus and their function; biogenesis and function of lysosomes; cell turnover in various tissues; control of cell growth and proliferation; molecular biology of extracellular matrix; structure, composition and function of basement membranes and connective tissue microfibrils; cell and mocrofibrils; cell and molecular biology of spermatogenesis; genetic expression of proteins in the formation of cytoskeletal components of spermatozoa; role of endocytosis and secretion by epididymal cells in sperm maturation; molecular biology of Sertoli cell secretions and their interaction with germ cells; synchronization of sperm production; transferrin, transferrin receptors and iron in germinal cells; differentiation of B lymphocytes in bone marrow in relation to mechanisms of humoral immunity, immunodeficiency states and B cell neoplasias; control mechanisms and cytokines in B lymphopoiesis; in situ organization and stromal cell-interactions of B lineage precursor cells in bone marrow; microenvironmental regulation of hemopoiesis; differentiation and regulation of cells mediating natural tumor immunosurveillance; tumor-cell biology; cell and molecular biology of the formation of dental enamel, dentin and bone; structure of organic matrices and inorganic crystals of dental enamel; role of hormones and their binding sites with calcified tissues; secretion and degradation of the proteins of enamel matrix, hypothalamo-pituitary function and gonadotropin patterns in ovarian follicular development; polycystic ovarian disease; computer assisted modeling of morphometric and kinetic data; cell biology and molecular genetics of ageing; senescence and cell cycle-specific genes and their products.

Research in the Department

investigates the dynamics and organization of molecules, organelles, cells and tissues in several major systems of the body. The work makes fundamental contributions to a number of established and emerging multidisciplinary fields: cell and Molecular Biology, Cellular Immunology and Hematology, Reproductive Biology, Calcified Tissue Biology, Tumor Cell Biology, Developmental Biology, neurobiology and Ageing.

The Department offers contemporary facilities for the wide range of techniques currently employed in research. Modern methods of cell and molecular biology, immunology and biochemistry are used in conjunction with specialized microscopy in a variety of experimental systems. Techniques used by Department members include labeling with radioisotopes and other tracers, radioautography, immunocytochemistry, histochemistry, cryo immune microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, high resolution electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, backscattered electron imaging, confocal microscopy, microinjection, video-microscopy in living cells, X-ray microanalysis, electron diffraction, freeze-fracture replication, computer reconstruction and quantitation, chromatography, subcellular fractionation, recombinant DNA technology, in situ hybridization, tissue grafting, cell and tissue culture, mutant and transgenic mice, hybridomas, and monoclonal antibodies.

The Department has one of the largest electron microscope facilities in Canada. Currently in use are three modern electron microscopes, including a high voltage instrument, the JEOL 2000FX. Combined with some of these microscopes are computer-aided analytical equipment capable of elemental microanalysis, histomorphometry, reconstruction and quantitation. The high voltage microscope is particularly useful for certain analytical electron optical procedures such as electron diffraction, lattice imaging and stereo electron microscoy.

2.3 Admission Requirements

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Programs

Admission to a Qualifying Program

Applicants whose academic degree and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the area chosen may, upon recommendation of the Graduate Student Affairs Committee and with the permission of the Director of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office, be admitted to Qualifying Programs. The courses to be taken in qualifying programs will be stipulated by the Graduate Student Affairs Committee. (Note: Only one qualifying program of a maximum of one year is permitted.)

2.4 Application Procedures

Application for admission to graduate studies for the degrees of M.Sc. or Ph.D. in Anatomy should be made to the Chair of Graduate Studies, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology.

Application forms and a brochure giving full details of the Graduate Program are available upon request.

Documents Required

McGill's on-line application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/applying/graduate.

2.5 Program Requirements

The M.Sc. program is a 48-credit program. Students must complete 15 credits in course work and 33 credits of thesis research (ANAT 698 and ANAT 699).

For the Ph.D. degree, the student must complete a series of courses selected to suit individual requirements. In addition, Ph.D. candidates will write a comprehensive examination after the end of the first year.

For both degrees, the major emphasis is placed on the conduct of original research and the preparation of a thesis.

2.6 Courses

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

Courses with numbers ending D1 and D2

are taught in two consecutive terms (most commonly Fall and Winter). Students must register for both the D1 and D2 components. No credit will be given unless both components (D1 and D2) are successfully completed in consecutive terms.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.
ANAT 541 Cell and Molecular Biology of Aging.

(3) (Winter) (2 hours lecture, 2 hours conference) (Prerequisites: ANAT 261, ANAT 262, or by special permission) This course will focus on how the complex aging process can be studied by modern cell and molecular approaches. Topics will include discussion on animal model systems for aging, gene regulation controlling the aging process and age-dependent diseases.

ANAT 663D1 (4.5), ANAT 663D2 (4.5) Histology.

(Students must register for both ANAT 663D1 and ANAT 663D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANAT 663D1 and ANAT 663D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) The study of the cytology and structure of tissues and organs.

ANAT 690D1 (3), ANAT 690D2 (3) Cell and Developmental Biology.

(Students must register for both ANAT 690D1 and ANAT 690D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANAT 690D1 and ANAT 690D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Current developments in molecular cell biology and developmental biology will be presented by course coordinators and staff from primary papers in the scientific literature. These will be researched and critiqued by students through oral and written presentations. Two term papers are required for students taking the course.

ANAT 698 M.Sc. Thesis Research 1.

(24)

l

ANAT 698D1 (12), ANAT 698D2 (12) M.Sc. Thesis Research 1.

(Students must register for both ANAT 698D1 and ANAT 698D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANAT 698D1 and ANAT 698D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANAT 698D1 and ANAT 698D2 together are equivalent to ANAT 698)

ANAT 699 M.Sc. Thesis Research Seminar.

(9)

l

ANAT 699D1 (4.5), ANAT 699D2 (4.5) M.Sc. Thesis Research Seminar.

(Students must register for both ANAT 699D1 and ANAT 699D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANAT 699D1 and ANAT 699D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANAT 699D1 and ANAT 699D2 together are equivalent to ANAT 699)

ANAT 701 Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination.

(0)

l

ANAT 701D1 (0), ANAT 701D2 (0) Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination.

(Students must register for both ANAT 701D1 and ANAT 701D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANAT 701D1 and ANAT 701D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANAT 701D1 and ANAT 701D2 together are equivalent to ANAT 701)

3 Animal Science

Department of Animal Science
Macdonald Campus
21,111 Lakeshore Road
Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC  H9X 3V9 
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-7794
Fax: (514) 398-7964
E-mail: animal.science@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/animal 
Chair
X. Zhao

3.1 Staff

Emeritus Professor
J.E. Moxley; B.Sc.(Agr.), M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(C'nell)
Professors
R.B. Buckland; B.Sc(Agr.), M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Maryland)
E.R. Chavez; Agr.Eng.(Chile), M.Sc. Ph.D.(Calif.)
B.R. Downey; D.V.M.(Tor.), Ph.D.(McG.)
J.F. Hayes; B.Agr.Sc., M.Agr.Sc.(Dub.), Ph.D.(N.C.St.)
U. Kuhnlein; B.Sc.(Fed. Inst. of Tech., Zurich), Ph.D.(Geneva)
K.F. Ng-Kwai-Hang; B.Sc.(Agr.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Associate Professors
R.I. Cue; B.Sc.(Newcastle-upon-Tyne), Ph.D.(Edin.)
H. Monardes; Ing. Agr.(Concepcion, Chile), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
L.E. Phillip; B.Sc.(Agr.), M.Sc.(Agr.)(McG.), Ph.D.(Guelph)
K.M. Wade; B.Sc.(Agr.), M.Sc.(Agr.)(Dublin), Ph.D.(C'nell)
D. Zadworny; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Guelph)
X. Zhao; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Nanjing), Ph.D.(C'nell) (William Dawson Scholar)
Assistant Professors
V. Bordignon; D.V.M.(URCAMP, Brazil), M.SC.(UFPel, Brazil), Ph.D.(Montreal)
R. Lacroix; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Que.), Ph.D.(McG.) (PT)
A.F. Mustafa; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Khartoum), Ph.D.(Sask.)
C. Ruiz-Feria; B.S. (Autonoma Chapingo, Mexico), M.Sc.(Texas A&M), Ph.D. (Ark.)
Adjunct Professors
P. Lacasse, D. Lefebvre, B. Murphy

3.2 Programs Offered

The Department provides laboratory facilities for research work leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in the disciplines of animal breeding (genetics), nutrition, and reproductive physiology, molecular biology, milk biochemistry and information systems. Within these areas advantage may be taken of strong research programs and expertise in molecular biology and milk biochemistry.

Students registered in the Department of Animal Science may develop programs in conjunction with other units at McGill, for example the Nutrition and Food Science Centre or the School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition.

Each student has an advisory committee composed of the thesis supervisor and at least two other faculty members.

3.3 Admission Requirements

M.Sc. (Thesis)

Candidates are required to have either a Bachelor's degree in Agriculture or a B.Sc. degree in an appropriate, related discipline with an equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class-upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program.

M.Sc. Applied

All candidates are required to have a B.Sc. degree or equivalent.

Ph.D.

Candidates are normally required to have an M.Sc. degree in an area related to the chosen field of specialization for the Ph.D. program.

3.4 Application Procedures

Applicants for graduate studies through academic units in the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences must forward supporting documents to:

Department of Animal Science
Macdonald Campus of McGill University
21,111 Lakeshore
Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC  H9X 3V9
Canada
Telephone: (514) 398-7792
Fax: (514) 398-7964
E-mail: animal.science@mcgill.ca

Applications will be considered upon receipt of a signed and completed application form, $60 application fee, and the following supporting documents:

Transcripts

- Two official copies of all university level transcripts with proof of degree(s) granted. Transcripts written in a language other than English or French must be accompanied by a certified translation. An explanation of the grading system used by the applicant's university is essential. It is the applicant's responsibility to arrange for transcripts to be sent.

It is desirable to submit a list of the titles of courses taken in the major subject, since transcripts often give code numbers only. Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a Bachelor's degree equivalent to a McGill Honours degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. This implies that about one-third of all undergraduate courses should have been devoted to the subject itself and another third to cognate subjects.

Letters of Recommendation

- Two letters of recommendation on letterhead (official paper) of originating institution or bearing the university seal and with original signatures from two instructors familiar with the applicant's work, preferably in the applicant's area of specialization. It is the applicant's responsibility to arrange for these letters to be sent.

Competency in English

- Non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate degree using the English language are required to submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English, by appropriate exams, e.g., TOEFL (minimum score 550 or 213 on computerized test) or IELTS (minimum 6.5 overall band). The MCHE is not considered equivalent. Results must be submitted as part of the application. The University code is 0935 (McGill University, Montreal); please use Department code 31(Graduate Schools), Biological Sciences - Agriculture, to ensure that your TOEFL reaches this office without delay.

Graduate Record Exam (GRE)

- The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

DOCUMENTS SUBMITTED WILL NOT BE RETURNED.

Application Fee (non-refundable)

- A fee of $60 Canadian must accompany each application (including McGill students), otherwise it cannot be considered. This sum must be remitted using one of the following methods:

1. Credit card (by completing the appropriate section of the application form). NB: on-line applications must be paid for by credit card.

2. Certified cheque in Cdn.$ drawn on a Canadian bank.

3. Certified cheque in U.S.$ drawn on a U.S. bank.

4. Canadian Money order in Cdn.$.

5. U.S. Money Order in U.S.$.

6. An international draft in Canadian funds drawn on a Canadian bank requested from the applicant's bank in his/her own country.

Deadlines

- Applications, including all supporting documents must reach the department no later than June 1 (March 1 for International) for the Fall Term (September); October 15 (July 1 for International) for the Winter Term (January); February 15 (November 1 for International) for the Summer Term (May). It may be necessary to delay review of the applicant's file until the following admittance period if application materials including supporting documents are received after these dates. International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of the deadline because immigration procedures may be lengthy. Applicants are encouraged to make use of the on-line application form available on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/applying/ graduate.

Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application.

Acceptance to all programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student's supervisor and the student obtaining financial support. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student's supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Qualifying Students

- Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying Program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying Program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

3.5 Program Requirements

M.Sc. (Thesis)
(45 credits)

Four one-term courses or the equivalent and two seminar courses at the post-graduate level are required, as a minimum, although a student may be advised to take additional courses as specified by his/her advisory committee. Advanced undergraduate courses may be considered for graduate credit if approved by the student's committee and the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office and passed at the graduate level; generally, this will not constitute more than one of the four required courses.

A minimum of 45 credits and completion of an acceptable thesis is required for the M.Sc. degree; 14 credits are for course work and 31 credits for the thesis (ANSC 680, ANSC 681, ANSC 682, and ANSC 683). Exceptional M.Sc. students may be considered for Ph.D. status after one full year in the Department.

M.Sc. Applied
(45 credits)

The M.Sc. Applied (non-thesis) degree is oriented to animal scientists already working in industry or government, to undergraduate students inspired by concepts in sustainable and integrated animal agriculture, to project leaders interested in animal resource management and to veterinarians. The program aims to provide graduate training in applied areas of animal production with a view towards integrating technology and management in animal production with allied areas of agricultural resource utilisation.

Project Component - Required
(15 credits)
ANSC 643
(3)
Project 1
ANSC 644
(3)
Project 2
ANSC 645
(3)
Project 3
ANSC 646
(3)
Project 4
ANSC 647
(3)
Project 5
Complementary Courses
(30 credits)
12 credits from the following list:
AEMA 610
(3)
Statistical Methods 2
ANSC 501
(3)
Advanced Animal Production Systems
ANSC 504
(3)
Population Genetics
ANSC 508
(3)
Tools in Animal Biotechnology
ANSC 551
(3)
Carbohydrate & Lipid Metabolism
ANSC 552
(3)
Protein Metabolism & Nutrition
ANSC 605
(3)
Estimation: Genetic Parameters
ANSC 606
(3)
Selection Index & Animal Improvement
ANSC 607
(3)
Linear Models in Agricurtural Research
ANSC 611
(3)
Advanced Reproductive Physiology
ANSC 622
(3)
Selected Topics in Molecular Biology
ANSC 630
(3)
Experimental Techniques: Animal Science: Macro
ANSC 635
(3)
Vitamins and Minerals in Nutrition
ANSC 636
(3)
Analysis - Animal Breeding Research Data
ANSC 691
(3)
Special Topic: Animal Sciences
ANSC 692
(3)
Topic in Animal Sciences 1
18 credits from the following list:
ABEN 518
(3)
Bio-Treatment of Wastes
AGEC 630
(3)
Food and Agricultural Policy
AGEC 633
(3)
Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
AGEC 642
(3)
Economics of Agricultural Development
BTEC 501
(3)
Bioinformatics
BTEC 502
(3)
Biotechnology Ethics and Society
ENTO 550
(3)
Veterinary and Medical Entomology
FDSC 535
(3)
Food Biotechnology
PLNT 602
(3)
Forage Crop Experimentation
PLNT 636
(3)
Epidemiology and Managment of Plant Disease
SOIL 521
(3)
Soil Microbiology and Biochemistry
WILD 605
(3)
Wildlife Ecology

Ph.D.

Since the Ph.D. is primarily a research degree, the amount of course work required may comprise a smaller portion of the total than is the case for the M.Sc., this will depend on the background of the individual student, and must be approved by the student's advisory committee. This course work must include two seminar courses at the graduate level and the Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination ANSC 701.

The thesis must clearly show originality and be a contribution to knowledge.

3.6 Courses

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

Courses with numbers ending D1 and D2

are taught in two consecutive terms (most commonly Fall and Winter). Students must register for both the D1 and D2 components. No credit will be given unless both components (D1 and D2) are successfully completed in consecutive terms.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.
ANSC 501 Advanced Animal Production Systems.

(3) (Winter) (3 lectures) An advanced course dealing with current world animal production systems (ruminant and monogastric) emphasizing their practices, constraints and relative efficiencies with a view to developing methods of improving productivity.

ANSC 504 Population Genetics.

(3) (Fall) (3 lectures) A consideration of the problems involved in the improvement of animals and the application of genetics in their solution.

ANSC 551 Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism.

(3) (Winter) (3 lectures) Comparative aspects of nutrition and metabolism of carbohydrate and lipid from the cellular level through the multi-organ of the whole organism. Main topics will include biothermodynamics, calorimetry, cellular metabolism and functions of carbohydrate and lipid, digestion, absorption and utilization of dietary carbohydrate and lipid.

ANSC 552 Protein Metabolism and Nutrition.

(3) (Fall) (3 lectures) Comparative aspects of nutrition and metabolism of amino acids and proteins from the cellular level on through the multisystem operation of the whole organism. Main topics include cellular metabolism and functions of amino acids and proteins, digestion, absorption and utilization of dietary protein. Comparison between farm animals and humans.

ANSC 605 Estimation: Genetic Parameters.

(3) (3 lectures) (Given in alternate years.) General methods for the estimation of components of variance and co-variance are considered, with specific emphasis given to their application to heritability, repeatability and genetic correlation estimation.

l

ANSC 606 Selection Index and Animal Improvement.

(3) (3 lectures)

ANSC 607 Linear Models in Agricultural Research.

(3) (3 lectures) The theory and application of linear models to agricultural research is considered. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of experimental and survey data with unequal subclass numbers.

l

ANSC 611 Advanced Reproductive Physiology.

(3) (2 lectures, 1 seminar) (Given in alternate years.)

ANSC 622 Selected Topics in Molecular Biology.

(3) (1 lecture and 2 seminars) (Prerequisite: MICR 500 or permission of instructor) Key examples of applications of molecular biology to the study of animal physiology and animal genetics will be drawn from the current literature and discussed in depth. The course has a dual purpose. It will familiarize students with current events at the forefront of molecular biology and will teach them how to read and critically evaluate research publications.

l

ANSC 623 Techniques Molecular Genetics: DNA Sequencing.

(3)

l

ANSC 624 Techniques Molecular Genetics: DNA Fingerprinting.

(3) (Requires previous laboratory experience.)

l

ANSC 625 Techniques Molecular Genetics: Polymerase Chain Reaction.

(3)

ANSC 630 Experimental Techniques: Animal Science: Macro.

(3) (1 lecture, 1 lab) Lectures and laboratories dealing with animal experimentation. Emphasis on the design and conduction of animal studies, selection of experimental animals, chemical and biological assays, statistical analysis, interpretation of data and preparation of technical reports.

ANSC 635 Vitamins and Minerals in Nutrition.

(3) (3 lectures) Modularised course dealing with advanced topics in Nutrition. The core of the course will focus on vitamins and minerals.

ANSC 636 Analysis - Animal Breeding Research Data.

(3) (3 lectures) An advanced graduate course to give training and experience in statistical techniques applied to quantitative genetics and animal breeding. To consider aspects of data handling of large data sets (100,000 observations), checks for consistency and connectedness in data. Considerations in choosing efficient analytical procedures in fitting these models and development of efficient numerical algorithms to apply these procedures.

l

ANSC 643 Project 1.

(3) Review of the literature and design of the project. This project relates to the M.Sc. Applied (non-thesis) degree.

l

ANSC 644 Project 2.

(3)

l

ANSC 645 Project 3.

(3)

l

ANSC 646 Project 4.

(3)

l

ANSC 647 Project 5.

(3)

ANSC 680 M.Sc. Thesis 1.

(7) Independent research under the direction of a supervisor toward completion of M.Sc. thesis.

ANSC 681 M.Sc. Thesis 2.

(7) Independent research under the direction of a supervisor toward completion of M.Sc. thesis.

ANSC 682 M.Sc. Thesis 3.

(7) Independent research under the direction of a supervisor toward completion of M.Sc. thesis.

ANSC 683 M.Sc. Thesis 4.

(10) Final submission and approval of M.Sc. thesis.

l

ANSC 691 Special Topic: Animal Sciences.

(3)

ANSC 691D1 (1.5), ANSC 691D2 (1.5) Special Topic: Animal Sciences.

(Students must register for both ANSC 691D1 and ANSC 691D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANSC 691D1 and ANSC 691D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANSC 691D1 and ANSC 691D2 together are equivalent to ANSC 691) Prescribed reading, conference or practical work on a selected topic in the student's area of specialization, not otherwise available in other courses; under staff supervision. An approved course outline must be on file in the Departmental office prior to registration deadline.

ANSC 691N1 Special Topic: Animal Sciences.

(1.5) (Students must also register for ANSC 691N2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANSC 691N1 and ANSC 691N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (ANSC 691N1 and ANSC 691N2 together are equivalent to ANSC 691) Prescribed reading, conference or practical work on a selected topic in the student's area of specialization, not otherwise available in other courses; under staff supervision. An approved course outline must be on file in the Departmental office prior to registration deadline.

ANSC 691N2 Special Topic: Animal Sciences.

(1.5) (Prerequisite: ANSC 691N1) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANSC 691N1 and ANSC 691N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (ANSC 691N1 and ANSC 691N2 together are equivalent to ANSC 691) See ANSC 691N1 for course description.

l

ANSC 692 Topic in Animal Sciences 1.

(3)

ANSC 692D1 (1.5), ANSC 692D2 (1.5) Topic in Animal Sciences 1.

(Students must register for both ANSC 692D1 and ANSC 692D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANSC 692D1 and ANSC 692D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANSC 692D1 and ANSC 692D2 together are equivalent to ANSC 692) Prescribed reading, conference or practical work on a selected topic in the student's area of specialization, not otherwise available in other courses; under staff supervision. An approved course outline must be on file in the Departmental office prior to registration deadline.

ANSC 692N1 Topic in Animal Sciences 1.

(1.5) (Students must also register for ANSC 692N2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANSC 692N1 and ANSC 692N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (ANSC 692N1 and ANSC 692N2 together are equivalent to ANSC 692) Prescribed reading, conference or practical work on a selected topic in the student's area of specialization, not otherwise available in other courses; under staff supervision. An approved course outline must be on file in the Departmental office prior to registration deadline.

l

ANSC 692N2 Topic in Animal Sciences 1.

(1.5) (Prerequisite: ANSC 692N1) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANSC 692N1 and ANSC 692N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (ANSC 692N1 and ANSC 692N2 together are equivalent to ANSC 692) See ANSC 692N1 for course description.

l

ANSC 693D1 (1.5), ANSC 693D2 (1.5) Topic in Animal Sciences 2.

(Students must register for both ANSC 693D1 and ANSC 693D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANSC 693D1 and ANSC 693D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)

l

ANSC 693N1 Topic in Animal Sciences 2.

(1.5) (Students must also register for ANSC 693N2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANSC 693N1 and ANSC 693N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period)

l

ANSC 693N2 Topic in Animal Sciences 2.

(1.5) (Prerequisite: ANSC 693N1) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANSC 693N1 and ANSC 693N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period)

ANSC 695 Animal Science Seminar 1.

(1) (1 hour) One of two seminars to be given by all students in an M.Sc. program. Consists of a review of literature in relation to the student's proposed research and an experimental design of the research to be conducted.

ANSC 696 Animal Science Seminar 2.

(1) (1 hour) One of two seminars to be given by all students in an M.Sc. program. Presentation of a current scientific topic which is not related to the student's research. The topic for the presentation should be cleared by the thesis supervisor.

ANSC 701 Doctoral Comprehensive Examination.

(0) (See Faculty Regulations)

ANSC 701D1 (0), ANSC 701D2 (0) Doctoral Comprehensive Examination.

(Students must register for both ANSC 701D1 and ANSC 701D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANSC 701D1 and ANSC 701D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANSC 701D1 and ANSC 701D2 together are equivalent to ANSC 701)

ANSC 797 Animal Science Seminar 3.

(1) (1 hour) One of two seminars to be given by all students in a Ph.D. program. Review of literature in relation to the student's proposed research and an experimental design of the research to be conducted.

ANSC 798 Animal Science Seminar 4.

(1) (1 hour) One of two seminars to be given by all students in a Ph.D. program. Presentation of a current scientific topic which is not related to the student's research. The topic for the presentation should be cleared by the thesis supervisor.

4 Anthropology

Department of Anthropology
Stephen Leacock Building
855 Sherbrooke Street W., Room 717
Montreal, QC  H3A 2T7
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-4300
Fax: (514) 398-7476
Web site: www.arts.mcgill.ca/programs/anthro 
Chair
Michael S. Bisson

4.1 Staff

Professors
Donald W. Attwood; A.B.(Calif.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Margaret Lock; B.Sc.(Leeds), M.A., Ph.D.(Calif.) (joint appoint. with Social Studies of Medicine)(on leave 2004-2005)
Jérome Rousseau; M.A.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Cantab.)
Philip Carl Salzman; A.B.(Antioch), M.A., Ph.D.(Chic.)(on leave 2004-2005)
Bruce G. Trigger; B.A.(Tor.), Ph.D.(Yale), F.R.S.C. (James McGill Professor) (on leave Jan.-Dec. 2004)
Allan Young; B.A.(Penn.), M.A.(Wash.), Ph.D.(Penn.) (joint appoint. with Social Studies of Medicine)
Associate Professors
Michael S. Bisson; B.A., M.A., Ph.D.(Calif.)
Laurel Bossen; B.A.(Barnard), M.A., Ph.D.(SUNY, Albany)
Ellen Corin; B.A., M.A., Ph.D.(Louvain) (joint appoint. with Psychiatry)
John Galaty; M.A., Ph.D.(Chic.)
Carmen Lambert; B.A.(Montr.), M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Kristin Norget; B.A.(Vic.,B.C.), M.Phil., D.Phil.(Cantab.)
James M. Savelle; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Ott.), M.A.(Ark.), Ph.D.(Alta.)
Colin H. Scott; B.A.(Regina), M.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Assistant Professors
André Costopoulos; B.A.(McG.), M.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Oulu, Finland)
Nicole Couture ; B.A. (Trent), M.A., Ph.D. (Chic.)
Sandra T. Hyde; B.A.(U.C. Santa Cruz), M.P.H.(Hawaii), Ph.D.(U.C. Berkeley)

4.2 Programs Offered

The Department offers training leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. in Anthropology. Admission is to the M.A. program, except when a student already holds a Master's degree. It is expected, however, that most applicants will be oriented towards achievement of the Ph.D.

The Department offers several alternative M.A. programs:

4.3 Admission Requirements

Master's

Admission to the M.A. program is open competitively to students holding an Honours or Major B.A. in Anthropology. Outstanding candidates with B.A. degrees in other disciplines but with substantial background related to anthropology are sometimes admitted on the condition that they complete a specified number of additional courses in Anthropology.

The applicants admitted usually have undergraduate Grade Point Averages of 3.5 or above on a 4.0 point scale.

Ph.D.

Admission to the Ph.D. program is open competitively to students with a Master's degree in Anthropology. In very special circumstances candidates with Master's degrees in related disciplines may be admitted.

4.4 Application Procedures

The deadlines for receipt of all application material for September admission is January 1.

Applications will be considered upon receipt of:

The Department admissions committee announces its selections by mid-March.

A number of teaching assistantships are available to graduate students in the Department. Applicants who wish to be considered for an assistantship, a McGill Recruitment Fellowship, or for Differential Fee Waivers (for international students) should include a note to that effect with their applications. For information regarding a variety of other fellowship programs, see the "Graduate Fellowships and Awards" section of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar.

Application information is available on the Department Web site.

4.5 Program Requirements

M.A. Degree

The purpose of the M.A. program is to provide advanced level training in anthropology and to prepare students for research at the Ph.D. level.

M.A. Degree with Thesis
(48 credits)

The Master's degree with thesis is a 48-credit program: 4 courses (12 credits) and the M.A. thesis (36 credits).

The student's program of work, which is based on his/her research interests, is developed in consultation with the student's supervisor and the two other members of his or her advisory committee. Students are required to take four courses in the form of seminars and/or tutorials. The set of four courses should be directed toward and converge in the thesis research. M.A. thesis research may take the form of fieldwork but a library thesis is strongly advised so that students can proceed more rapidly to the Ph.D.

M.A. Degree with Research Paper
(45 credits)

The Master's degree with research paper is a 45-credit program: 5 courses (15 credits), a Proseminar (6 credits) and the research paper (24 credits).

The student's program of work is developed in consultation with the student's supervisor and the two other members of his or her advisory committee. It consists of: five courses (seminars or tutorials), only one of which is optional, a research paper proposal and the research paper. They must also attend the Proseminar. The research paper will normally be based on library research but can involve limited and preferably local fieldwork. The research paper should demonstrate the student's ability to define a problem, place it in a theoretical and factual context, collect and analyze data, and write up a report.

M.A. Degree in Medical Anthropology
(48 credits)

The M.A. program in Medical Anthropology is given jointly by the Department of Anthropology and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine (SSOM). For additional information, including seminar offerings, please refer to the SSOM section.

The program is open to students with backgrounds in the social sciences, the medical professions, or the medical sciences. The M.A. degree is awarded by the Anthropology Department and admission is granted by a joint admissions committee made up of representatives from Anthropology and SSOM. Within the medical anthropology program, candidates will apply for permission to take one of the following courses of study:

This course of study is taken by students with an academic background in anthropology. Course and thesis requirements are the same as described in the M.A. in Anthropology, with thesis, with the following differences: students are required to take two Seminars in Medical Anthropology (HSSM 605, ANTH 615), as two of their four courses.

This option is offered as an alternative for students with a background in Anthropology. Students are required to take five courses: two Seminars in Medical Anthropology (HSSM 605, ANTH 615) as well as the following courses in anthropology: Theory 1, Research Methods, and Quantitative Methods. They must also attend the Anthropology Proseminar. In addition, students are required to write a research paper.

This course of study is taken by students who lack a strong academic background in anthropology. These students are required to take eight courses (24 credits), including two seminars in Medical Anthropology (HSSM 605, ANTH 615) and at least five additional graduate courses in anthropology (Theory 1 and Research Methods are recommended). In addition, students are required to write a research paper.

Ph.D. Degree

The purpose of the Ph.D. program is to enable a student to make an original contribution to anthropological research in the form of a doctoral thesis. This must be based on a comprehensive understanding of prior research relevant to the topic investigated.

All requirements for the M.A. must be completed. Students holding an M.A. from another discipline may be requested to take seminars covering deficiencies in their previous training.

Candidates must (1) pass a language exam; (2) demonstrate comprehensive understanding of prior research in three subfields of anthropology through the successful completion of three courses; these courses are the Ph.D. Tutorials listed below; (3) submit and orally defend a research proposal; and (4) carry out field research and submit an original thesis for examination and oral defense.

4.6 Courses for Higher Degrees

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

Courses with numbers ending D1 and D2

are taught in two consecutive terms (most commonly Fall and Winter). Students must register for both the D1 and D2 components. No credit will be given unless both components (D1 and D2) are successfully completed in consecutive terms.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.
ANTH 551 Advanced Topics: Archaeological Research.

(3) (Fall) Examination and discussion of topics of current theoretical or methodological interest in archaeology. Topics will be announced at the beginning of term.

ANTH 555 Advanced Topics in Ethnology.
(3) (Restriction: Honours students at the U3 level in the Anthropology Department or with permission of instructor) Examination and discussion of topics of current theoretical or methodological interest in ethnology. Topics will be announced at the beginning of term.

l

ANTH 602 Theory 1.

(3)

l

ANTH 602D1 (1.5), ANTH 602D2 (1.5) Theory 1.

(Students must register for both ANTH 602D1 and ANTH 602D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANTH 602D1 and ANTH 602D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANTH 602D1 and ANTH 602D2 together are equivalent to ANTH 602)

l

ANTH 603 Theory 2.

(3)

l

ANTH 605 Culture Area.

(3)

ANTH 607D1 (3), ANTH 607D2 (3) Proseminar in Archaeology.

(Students must register for both ANTH 607D1 and ANTH 607D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANTH 607D1 and ANTH 607D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)

ANTH 609D1 (3), ANTH 609D2 (3) Proseminar in Anthropology.

(Students must register for both ANTH 609D1 and ANTH 609D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANTH 609D1 and ANTH 609D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANTH 609D1 and ANTH 609D2 together are equivalent to ANTH 609)

ANTH 610 Social Organization.

(3)

l

ANTH 611 Research Design.

(3)

ANTH 614 Economic Anthropology.

(3)

ANTH 615 Seminar in Medical Anthropology.

(3)

ANTH 616 Political Anthropology.

(3)

l

ANTH 625 Cultural Ecology.

(3)

ANTH 631 Symbolic Anthropology.

(3)

ANTH 634 Anthropology of Development 1.

(3)

l

ANTH 635 Anthropology of Development 2.

(3)

l

ANTH 638 Complex Societies.

(3)

ANTH 640 Psychological Anthropology.

(3)

ANTH 648 Structural Anthropology.

(3)

l

ANTH 652 Anthropology and Gender.

(3)

ANTH 660 Research Methods.

(3)

l

ANTH 665 Quantitative Methods.

(3)

ANTH 670 Archaeological Theory 1.

(3)

ANTH 671 Archaeological Theory 2.

(3)

l

ANTH 673 Archaeological Field Methods.

(3)

l

ANTH 676 Archaeological Area.

(3)

l

ANTH 678 Ethnohistory.

(3)

ANTH 680 Tutorial Reading 1.

(3)

ANTH 681 Tutorial Reading 2.

(3)

ANTH 682 Tutorial Reading 3

(3)

ANTH 683 Tutorial Reading 4.

(3)

ANTH 684 Tutorial Reading 5.

(3)

l

ANTH 685 Research Tutorial 1.

(3)

l

ANTH 686 Research Tutorial 2.

(3)

ANTH 690 Research Paper 1.

(6)

ANTH 691 Research Paper 2.

(6)

ANTH 692 Research Paper 3.

(6)

ANTH 693 Research Paper 4.

(6)

ANTH 694 M.A. Thesis Tutorial 1.

(6)

ANTH 695 M.A. Thesis Tutorial 2.

(6)

l

ANTH 696 M.A. Research Paper.

(15)

l

ANTH 699 M.A. Thesis.

(24)

ANTH 699D1 (12), ANTH 699D2 (12) M.A. Thesis.

(Students must register for both ANTH 691D1 and ANTH 691D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANTH 699D1 and ANTH 699D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANTH 699D1 and ANTH 699D2 together are equivalent to ANTH 699)

l

ANTH 700 Ph.D. Preliminary Examination.

(6)

ANTH 700D1 (3), ANTH 700D2 (3) Ph.D. Preliminary Examination.

(Students must register for both ANTH 700D1 and ANTH 700D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANTH 700D1 and ANTH 700D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANTH 700D1 and ANTH 700D2 together are equivalent to ANTH 700)

l

ANTH 702 Advanced Anthropological Theory.

(3)

l

ANTH 760 Advanced Anthropological Methods.

(3)

l

ANTH 770 Advanced Archaeological Theory.

(3)

l

ANTH 773 Advanced Archaeological Methods.

(3)

l

ANTH 780 Reading and Research.

(3)

l

ANTH 781 Reading and Research.

(3)

l

ANTH 790 Ph.D. Tutorial 1.

(3)

ANTH 790D1 (1.5), ANTH 790D2 (1.5) Ph.D. Tutorial 1.

(Students must register for both ANTH 790D1 and ANTH 790D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANTH 790D1 and ANTH 790D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANTH 790D1 and ANTH 790D2 together are equivalent to ANTH 790)

l

ANTH 791 Ph.D. Tutorial 2.

(3)

ANTH 791D1 (1.5), ANTH 791D2 (1.5) Ph.D. Tutorial 2.

(Students must register for both ANTH 791D1 and ANTH 791D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANTH 791D1 and ANTH 791D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANTH 791D1 and ANTH 791D2 together are equivalent to ANTH 791)

l

ANTH 792 Ph.D. Tutorial 3.

(3)

ANTH 792D1 (1.5), ANTH 792D2 (1.5) Ph.D. Tutorial 3.

(Students must register for both ANTH 792D1 and ANTH 792D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ANTH 792D1 and ANTH 792D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ANTH 792D1 and ANTH 792D2 together are equivalent to ANTH 792)

5 Architecture

School of Architecture
Macdonald Harrington Building
815 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2K6
Canada  
Telephone: (514) 398-6700
Fax: (514) 398-7372
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/architecture 
Director
David Covo
Graduate Program Coordinator
Alberto Pérez-Gómez

5.1 Staff

Emeritus Professors
Harold Spence-Sales; B.A.(Well.), A.A.Dipl., L.L.D.(S. Fraser)
Radoslav Zuk; B.Arch.(McG.), M.Arch.(M.I.T.), D.Sc.(U.A.A.), F.R.A.I.C., O.A.Q., O.A.A.
Professors
Vikram Bhatt; N.Dip Arch.(Ahmed.), M.Arch.(McG.), M.R.A.I.C.
Derek Drummond; B.Arch.(McG.), F.R.A.I.C., O.A.Q., O.A.A. (William C. Macdonald Professor of Architecture)
Avi Friedman; B.Arch.(Technion), M.Arch.(McG.), Ph.D.(Montr.), O.A.Q., I.A.A.
Alberto Pérez-Gómez; Dipl.Eng.(Nat.Pol.Inst.Mexico), M.A., Ph.D.(Essex) (Saidye Rosner Bronfman Professor of Architectural History)
Adrian Sheppard; B.Arch.(McG.), M.Arch.(Yale), F.R.A.I.C., O.A.Q., A.A.P.P.Q.
Associate Professors
Annmarie Adams; B.A.(McG.), M.Arch., Ph.D.(Calif.), M.R.A.I.C. (William Dawson Scholar)
Martin Bressani; B.Sc.(McG.), B.Arch.(McG), M.Sc.(Arch.)(MIT), D.E.A., Docteur (Paris-Sorbonne - Paris IV), O.A.Q.
Ricardo Castro; B.Arch.(Los Andes, Col.), M.Arch., M.A.(Oregon), M.R.A.I.C.
David Covo; B.Sc.(Arch.), B.Arch.(McG.), F.R.A.I.C., O.A.Q.
Robert Mellin; B.Arch., M.Sc.(Arch.) (Penn.State), M.Arch.(McG.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(U.Penn.), M.R.A.I.C., N.A.A.
Pieter Sijpkes; B.Sc.(Arch.), B.Arch.(McG.)
Faculty Lecturer
Julia Bourke
Course Lecturers
Manon Asselin, Jean D'Aragon, Lisa Landrum, Nadia Meratla, Carlos Rueda Plata, David Theodore
Adjunct Professors
Cecile Baird, Ewa Bieniecka, Lawrence Bird, Michael Carroll, Nathalie David, Howard Davies, Georges Drolet, Gordon Edwards, François Émond, Julia Gersovitz, Nan Griffiths, Dan Hanganu, Pierre Jampen, Richard Klopp, Phyllis Lambert, Seymour Levine, Anna Mainella, Harry Mayerovitch, Sybil McKenna, Serge Melanson, Rosanne Moss, Carl Mulvey, Joanna Nash, Harry Parnass, Louise Pelletier, Mark Poddubiuk, Louis Pretty, Daniella Rohan, Richard Russell, Robert Stanley, Sheila Theophanides, Samson Yip, Jozef Zorko
Adjunct Professors
Cecile Baird, Ewa Bieniecka, Lawrence Bird, Julia Bourke, Michael Carroll, Nathalie David, Howard Davies, Georges Drolet, Gordon Edwards, François Émond, Julia Gersovitz, Mark Ginocchio, Dan Hanganu, Phyllis Lambert, Seymour Levine, Anna Mainella, Harry Mayerovitch, Serge Melanson, Rosanne Moss, Carl Mulvey, Joanna Nash, Louise Pelletier, Mark Poddubiuk, Louis Pretty, Daniella Rohan, Jacques Rousseau, Richard Russell, Robert Stanley, Fred Weiser, Samson Yip, Jozef Zorko

5.2 Programs Offered

M.Arch.I (professional), M.Arch. II (post-professional) (non-thesis), Graduate Diploma in Housing, Ph.D.

The professional M.Arch.I program is accredited by the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB), and is recognized as accredited by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) in the U.S.A.

There are two areas of study in the post-professional M.Arch.II and Ph.D. programs: Architectural History and Theory, and Housing (which includes Affordable Homes, Domestic Environments, and Minimum Cost Housing).

Information concerning the duration of programs, documents required of applicants, etc., may be obtained from: profdegree. architecture@mcgill.ca (M.Arch.I), postprofmaster.architecture@ mcgill.ca (M.Arch.II and Graduate Diploma in Housing), or phd.architecture@mcgill.ca (Ph.D.).

Architectural Certification in Canada

In Canada, all provincial associations recommend a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit Canadian professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes two types of accredited degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture and the Master of Architecture. A program may be granted a five-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on its degree of conformance with established educational standards.

Masters degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, which, when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

Since all provincial associations in Canada recommend any applicant for licensure to have graduated from a CACB-accredited program, obtaining such a degree is an essential aspect of preparing for the professional practice for architecture. While graduation from a CACB-accredited program does not assure registration, the accrediting process is intended to verify that each accredited program substantially meets those standards that, as a whole, comprise an appropriate education for an architect.

5.3 Admission Requirements

M.Arch. I (professional) Program

Students holding the McGill B.Sc.(Arch.) degree, or equivalent, with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on a scale of 4.0, are eligible to apply for admission.

M.Arch. II (post-professional) (non-thesis) and Graduate Diploma in Housing

Students holding an accredited professional degree in architecture, or equivalent, with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 on a scale of 4.0, are eligible to apply for admission. In special cases, candidates with a degree in a related field may be considered.

Ph.D.

Candidates with high standing in McGill's M.Arch.II, or who hold an equivalent degree from another university, are eligible to apply to this program. Those who do not have an appropriate background in the chosen research area may be admitted to Ph.D.I. Candidates who have an adequate background at the post-professional Master's level in the proposed area of research will be admitted to Ph.D.II.

A working knowledge of a language or languages relevant to the area of research may be required.

5.4 Application Procedures

Professional Master of Architecture: M.Arch.I

McGill B.Sc.(Arch.) Graduates:

Others:

*These documents are available in PDF format on the School of Architecture Web site.

Post-professional programs:
M.Arch. II, Ph.D. and Graduate Diploma in Housing

5.5 Program Requirements

M.Arch. I

McGill's professional program in Architecture is structured as a four-and-a-half-year, or nine-term, course of study divided into two parts. The first part is a six-term (minimum) design program leading to a non-professional degree, Bachelor of Science (Architecture). Applicants whose background includes a university degree in an area not related to Architecture should apply to the B.Sc.(Arch.) program. Further information on the B.Sc.(Arch.) program can be found in the Faculty of Engineering section of the Undergraduate Programs Calendar, available at www.mcgill.ca. The second part, for students with the B.Sc.(Arch.) degree, or the equivalent, is the professional Master of Architecture program.

The professional Master of Architecture program is a one-and-a-half year, or three-term course of studies leading to the M.Arch. I degree. Applicants whose background includes a non-professional degree in Architecture equivalent to the McGill B.Sc.(Arch.) may be eligible for admission directly to the professional M.Arch. I program. In certain cases, qualified applicants may be required to complete a qualifying year, up to a maximum of 30 credits or two terms, before entering the three-term M.Arch. I program. Further information may be obtained at the School of Architecture website: www.mcgill.ca/architecture/programs/professional.

M.Arch.I Program of Study
(45 credits)
ARCH 550
(3)
Urban Planning 1
ARCH 551
(3)
Urban Planning 2
ARCH 554
(2)
Mechanical Services
ARCH 555
(2)
Environmental Acoustics
ARCH 671
(4)
Design Research and Methodology
ARCH 672
(6)
Architectural Design 1
ARCH 673
(8)
Architectural Design 2
ARCH 674
(2)
Professional Practice 1
ARCH 675
(2)
Professional Practice 2
ARCH 676
(2)
Specifications and Building Costs
ARCH 678
(3)
Advanced Construction
ARCH 679
(1)
Architectural Journalism
ARCH 680
(1)
Sketching School 2
6 credits of complementaries/electives, of which a minimum of 3 credits must be from an architectural complementary.

Unless otherwise indicated, the above courses are restricted to students in the professional program.

M.Arch.II
(45 credits)

The post-professional Masters (M.Arch.II) is open to applicants who have a professional degree in architecture. Students holding the McGill B.Arch. (former) or M.Arch.I (new) degree, or an equivalent professional qualification, with a CGPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 point scale, are eligible for admission to the graduate programs. In special cases, applicants with a degree in a related field may be considered. The primary requirement for the M.Arch.II is 30 credits of course work, to be completed in the first two terms, and a 15-credit project report that can be completed during the summer, or in the following fall term. The residence requirement for the M.Arch.II degree is three academic terms, making it possible for students who elect to work on their project report in the summer term to obtain their degree after twelve calendar months in the program.

Ph.D.

Doctoral candidates must have their thesis proposal approved by their advisor (ARCH 700) before embarking on their research. A Thesis Advisory Committee is then struck and is responsible for monitoring the student's research. For course number ARCH 701, a comprehensive research proposal is required, as well as a demonstration of broad knowledge in the field. Candidates will submit two further reports in formal meetings with the Advisory Committee, who will review the work in progress (ARCH 702 and ARCH 703). The final meeting takes place after the Committee has reviewed the full draft of the dissertation. If approved, the dissertation will then be submitted in its final form to the Thesis Office. Acceptance of the thesis by the examiners is followed by an oral defense.

Graduate Diploma in Housing

The Graduate Diploma in Housing is open to applicants who have a professional degree in architecture. The Diploma program is a two-term program which is intended for professionals who have worked in the area of housing in North America or in the developing world. The program is designed for those who, while wishing to advance their knowledge in the housing field, are not able, or inclined, to undertake studies towards a Master's degree.

5.6 Courses

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

Denotes limited enrolment
l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.

l

ARCH 520 Montreal: Urban Morphology.

(3) (2-1-6) (Prerequisite: ARCH 251)

l

ARCH 521 Structure of Cities.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 202 or permission of instructor)

l

ARCH 522 History of Domestic Architecture in Quebec.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 251) (Departmental permission required).

l

H
ARCH 523 Significant Texts and Buildings.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 251) (Alternating with ARCH 524) (Departmental permission required).

l

H
ARCH 524 Seminar on Architectural Criticism.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 251) (Alternating with ARCH 523) (Departmental permission required).

l

ARCH 525 Seminar on Analysis and Theory.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 202 or permission of instructor) (Departmental permission required) Analysis and evaluation of significant architectural projects with reference to contemporary architectural theories.

ARCH 526 Philosophy of Structure.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 202 or permission of Instructor) (Not open to students who have taken ARCH 374) Philosophy of Structure aims to investigate structure in its broadest sense. The course is divided in two halves; the first one gives an overview of the development of theoretical structural frameworks such as mathematics and geometry, while the second one highlights physical structures constructed by nature (geology, turbulence), man or animals.

ARCH 527 Civic Design.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 378) The elements of form in buildings and their siting design in the urban setting.

ARCH 528 History of Housing.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 251 or permission of instructor) Indigenous housing both transient and permanent, from the standpoint of individual structure and pattern of settlements. The principal historic examples of houses including housing in the age of industrial revolution and contemporary housing.

ARCH 529 Housing Theory.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 528 or permission of instructor) A review of environmental alternatives in housing; contemporary housing and the physical and sociological determinants that shape it; Canadian housing.

ARCH 531 Architectural Intentions Vitruvius - Renaissance.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 251) Architectural intentions embodied in buildings and writings of architects from antiquity to the Renaissance. Special emphasis is placed on the cultural connections of architecture to science and philosophy.

ARCH 532 Origins of Modern Architecture.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 251) Examination of architectural intentions (theory and practice) in the European context (especially France, Italy and England), during the crucial period that marks the beginning of the modern era.

l

ARCH 534 Architectural Archives.

(3) (3-0-6) (Prerequisites: ARCH 250 and ARCH 251 or equivalent.) (Restriction: Open only to architecture students.)

ARCH 540 Selected Topics in Architecture 1.

(3) (2-0-7) A course to allow the introduction of new topics in Architecture as needs arise, by regular and visiting staff.

ARCH 541 Selected Topics in Architecture 2.

(3) (2-0-7) A course to allow the introduction of new topics in Architecture as needs arise, by regular and visiting staff.

ARCH 550 Urban Planning 1.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: B.Sc.(Arch.) or permission of instructor) (Not normally open to Urban Planning students) Theory and practice. An examination of different basic approaches to urban planning with special reference to Quebec.

ARCH 551 Urban Planning 2.

(3) (2-1-6) (Prerequisite: ARCH 550) Urban design and project development, theory and practice. Detailed analysis of selected examples of the development process and of current techniques in urban design. Includes case studies from Quebec and elsewhere.

ARCH 554 Mechanical Services.

(2) (2-0-4) (Prerequisite: ARCH 405 or permission of instructor) Problems encountered in providing mechanical services in buildings. Physiological and environmental aspects of heat, ventilation and air conditions, estimation of heating and cooling loads and selection and specification of equipment. Sprinkler systems and plumbing. Construction problems produced by installation of this equipment.

ARCH 555 Environmental Acoustics.

(2) (2-0-4) (Prerequisite: ARCH 405 or permission of instructor) Acoustics in architectural design, and in environmental control of buildings. Acoustical requirements in the design of auditoria such as theatres, lecture halls, opera houses, concert halls, churches, motion picture theatres, studios. Principles of noise and vibration control, sound insulating in building construction. Practical noise control in various types of buildings.

ARCH 622 Critical Writing.

(3) (2-1-6) Seminar to critically review an architectural topic.

ARCH 623 Project Preparation.

(3) (2-1-6) Guided background preparation for the project.

ARCH 624 History and Theory Project.

(15) (0-15-30) Thematic, site-specific experimental design with an emphasis on process, including 1) survey/mapping and 2) preparation of text, drawings and models.

ARCH 627 Research Methods.

(3) (2-1-6) Different approaches and research methods in housing. Setting of goals and objectives, identification of appropriate research methods, collection and evaluation of information, analysis and synthesis of data, and presentation of the findings.

ARCH 628 Housing Project Report.

(15) (0-15-30) A supervised project report based on material developed by candidates in the project preparation course. It may include on-site explorations of housing projects, surveying and documentation, critical analysis, and creative mapping of the same, plus an evaluation report.

ARCH 630 Housing Seminar 1.

(3) (2-0-7) Strategies for affordable and low-cost housing. Investigation of cost-saving measures both at urban and dwelling unit levels. An analysis of recent low-cost housing projects.

ARCH 631 Housing Seminar 2.

(3) (2-0-7) Strategies for affordable and low-cost housing. Investigation of cost-saving measures both at urban and dwelling unit levels. An analysis of recent low-cost housing projects.

l

ARCH 634 Housing Report.

(6) (2-10-6)

l

ARCH 635 Selected Topics in Housing 1.

(3) (3-0-6) Special topics related to housing.

l

ARCH 636 Selected Topics in Housing 2.

(3) (3-0-6) Special topics related to housing.

ARCH 645 Housing Project 1.

(6) (2-10-6) Innovative housing designs; lectures and studio work leading to a design project.

ARCH 646 Housing Project 2.

(6) (2-10-6) Innovative housing designs; lectures and studio work leading to a design project.

ARCH 650 Architectural History Seminar 1.

(8) (3-5-16) Western Architectural history from Antiquity to the Renaissance. A hermeneutic reading of primary sources, i.e. a section or chapter of an historical treatise, a frontispiece or image, in the framework of recent scholarship on the subject.

ARCH 651 Architectural History Seminar 2.

(8) (3-5-16) Early Modern European theory of architecture, 17th - 19th centuries. A hermeneutic reading of primary sources, i.e. a section or chapter of an historical treatise, a frontispiece or image, in the framework of recent scholarship on the subject.

ARCH 652 Architectural Theory Seminar 1.

(4) (4-0-8) Phenomenology and hermeneutic.

ARCH 653 Architectural Theory Seminar 2.

(4) (4-0-8) The experience of modernity in cultural criticism, philosophy, literature and art.

ARCH 671 Design Research and Methodology.

(4) (1-4-7) An architectural design problem is selected, bibliographic research undertaken, site selection established: program developed and theoretical approach evolved in preparation for course ARCH 673.

ARCH 672 Architectural Design 1.

(6) (2-10-6) A series of complex architectural and urban design issues are addressed with the intention of improving the student's facility to critically assess existing design solutions, to seek alternatives and to articulate clearly the rational and the impact of alternative proposals.

ARCH 673 Architectural Design 2.

(8) (2-14-8) (Prerequisite: ARCH 671 and ARCH 672) An individual, student-selected and faculty-approved study of complex architectural design objectives involving site and building program constraints, the integration of building systems and the demonstration of comprehensive design and presentation skills.

ARCH 674 Professional Practice 1.

(2) (2-0-4) The architect's relationship to his/her client: responsibility, business conduct, supervision, arbitration, issuing of certificates, competitions, standard forms of contracts, payments, liens, servitudes, public health, building regulations, fees.

ARCH 675 Professional Practice 2.

(2) (2-0-4) (Prerequisite: ARCH 674) The construction process will be examined. Topics include project and construction management, contracting methods, tendering, sureties, site safety, negotiations, cost control, quality control, delay claims, legal hypothecs. Standard documentation and procedures will be reviewed, including CCDC contract, OAQ forms, CSC MasterFormat.

ARCH 676 Specifications and Building Costs.

(2) (2-0-4) Principles of writing architectural specifications; discussion of actual specifications and practice in specifying for common trades; essays on common building materials; costing of materials and building assemblies.

ARCH 678 Advanced Construction.

(3) (2-0-7) (Prerequisite: ARCH 674) An exploration of construction in relation to architectural design; research in advanced methods of construction and structure related to design problems and built projects; appropriate technologies and alternatives.

ARCH 679 Architectural Journalism.

(1) (0-0-3) (Prerequisite: ARCH 674) The project deals with the review and criticism of a recently constructed controversial building.

ARCH 680 Sketching School 2.

(1) (0-0-3) An eight-day supervised field trip in the late summer to sketch places or things having specific visual characteristics.

l

ARCH 690 Thesis Research 1.

(3) (0-2-7) Ongoing research pertaining to thesis.

l

ARCH 691 Thesis Research 2.

(6) (0-2-16) Ongoing research pertaining to thesis.

l

ARCH 692 Thesis Research 3.

(6) (0-2-16) Ongoing research pertaining to thesis.

l

ARCH 693 Thesis Research 4.

(12) (0-2-34) Ongoing research pertaining to thesis.

ARCH 700 Dissertation Proposal.

(0) Evaluation of research proposals to finalize a preliminary thesis proposal. Development of a comprehensive framework for the research project.

ARCH 701 Comprehensive Oral Examination.

(0) Presentation of research to an Advisory Committee, including a comprehensive review of material in the field.

ARCH 702 Progress Report 1.

(0) Research in progress and the writing of the dissertation.

ARCH 703 Progress Report 2.

(0) Final presentation of the dissertation to the committee.

6 Art History

Department of Art History and Communication Studies
Arts Building,W-225 (West Wing, top floor)
853 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2T6
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-6541
Fax: (514) 398-7247
E-mail: ahcs@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.arts.mcgill.ca/programs/AHCS 
Chair ; Director, Graduate Programs in Communication Studies
TBA
Director, Graduate Programs in Art History

Christine Ross

6.1 Staff

Emeritus Professors
John M. Fossey; B.A.(Birm.), D.U.(Lyon II), F.S.A., R.P.A.
George Szanto; B.A.(Dart.), Ph.D.(Harv.)
Professor
Hans J. Böker; Ph.D.(Saarbrücken), Dr. Ing.-habil(Hannover)
Associate Professors
David Crowley; B.A.(Johns H.), M.Sc.(Penn.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Christine Ross; M.A.(C'dia.), Ph.D.(Paris I)
Will Straw; B.A.(Carl.), M.A., Ph.D.(McG.) (on leave Sept. 2004 - Aug. 2005)
Assistant Professors
Jenny Burman; B.A.(C'dia), M.A., Ph.D.(York)
Ting Chang; B.A.(McG.), M.A.(Tor.), Ph.D.(Sussex)
Charmaine Nelson; B.F.A., M.A.(C'dia), Ph.D.(Man.)
Bronwen Wilson; B.A., M.A.(U.B.C.), Ph.D.(Northwestern)
Angela Vanhaelen; B.A.(W.Ont.), M.A., Ph.D.(U.B.C.)
Adjunct Professors
David W. Booth, Louis De Moura Sobral, Johanne Lamoureux, Charles Levine, Constance Naubert-Riser

6.2 Programs Offered

M.A. and Ph.D.

Areas of Specialization:

Western Medieval Art; Medieval Architecture; Post-Medieval Architecture; Renaissance Art; Baroque Art; Late Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century Art; Twentieth-Century Art; Chinese Art; Canadian Art; Methodology; Feminist Art History

To obtain financial aid information please consult the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Web site at www.mcgill.ca/gps or e-mail graduate.fellowships@mcgill.ca.

For programs in Communications, refer to section 18.

6.3 Admission Requirements

Entrance into either the M.A. or Ph.D. programs is limited to the best qualified applicants. A minimum CGPA of 3.3 out of 4.0 or the equivalent, i.e., B+ (75%), is required.

To apply to the M.A. program, candidates are normally expected to have a B.A. Honours degree either in Art History alone or in Art History and one other closely related field. But regardless of the program, the Department normally requires a minimum of 36 credits (at least 12 courses) in Art History with emphasis on European art and architecture. For candidates from institutions not offering the above number of credits in Art History, provision is made, upon consultation with the Director of Graduate Programs, for a program of study which would then qualify the candidate to apply for M.A. work.

In order to apply to the Ph.D. program, candidates must normally hold an M.A. degree preferably in Art History or an M.A. degree in a closely related field together with an appropriate number of Art History credits such as are described for entrance into the M.A. program. Applicants are strongly encouraged to consult with the Director of Graduate Programs. The number of entrants to the doctoral program is necessarily limited to the most highly qualified applicants.

It should be noted that courses in studio practice, although useful, cannot be counted among the 36 Art History credits for either the M.A. or Ph.D programs. Also please see as well the language requirements given under the degree programs below.

The Department also requires a 250-word statement outlining the candidate's major interest in Art History as well as an example of written work. Applicants should send complete dossiers by January 15 to the Graduate Administrative Coordinator, Department of Art History and Communication Studies.

6.4 Application Procedures

Applications will be considered upon receipt of:

Deadline for application is January 15.

Inquiries regarding the Programs should be addressed to the Graduate Administrative Coordinator, Department of Art History and Communication Studies (ahcs@mcgill.ca).

McGill's on-line application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/applying/graduate.

6.5 Program Requirements

Master of Arts

M.A. Degree in Art History
(45 credits)
Required Courses
(30 credits)
ARTH 600
(3)
Advanced Pro-Seminar
ARTH 605
(3)
Master's Thesis Preparation
ARTH 698
(12)
Thesis Research 1
ARTH 699
(12)
Thesis Research 2
Complementary Courses
(15 credits)

Course work of 15 graduate level credits of which a maximum of 6 credits, upon the advice of the supervisor and with the permission of the Graduate Studies Director, may be taken from a list of courses offered in other disciplines as approved by the Department.

Language requirements for the M.A. degree:

Beside a proficiency in English and French, students must demonstrate reading knowledge of any language relating to their research project assessed by means of a written translation of a text.

Doctor of Philosophy
Ph.D. Degree in Art History

Required Courses
(3 credits)
ARTH 600
(3)
Advanced Pro-Seminar
ARTH 701
(0)
Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination

Ph.D. Thesis Research

Complementary Courses
(12 credits)

Course work of 12 graduate credits of which a maximum of 6 credits, upon the advice of the supervisor and with the permission of the Graduate Studies Director, may be taken from a list of courses offered in other disciplines as approved by the Department.

Language requirements for the Ph.D. degree:

Beside a proficiency in English and French, students must demonstrate reading knowledge of any language relating to their research project assessed by means of a written translation of a text.

The Department is prepared to direct dissertations in fields wherein adequate supervision and resources can be provided: see section 6.2. Candidates are also advised to consult the General Information section of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar.

6.6 Courses for Higher Degrees

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva-students (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

Students may also consult the Department Web site (www.arts.mcgill.ca/programs/AHCS) for information.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

l

ARTH 600 Advanced Pro-Seminar

(3)

ARTH 605 Master's Thesis Preparation.

(3) (Restriction: For Art History students only.) The aim is to introduce the student to research methods specific to his/her area of thesis work.

ARTH 617 Modern Art.

(3)

l

ARTH 618 Art History - 1400-1900 1.

(3)

ARTH 619 Art History - 1400-1900 2.

(3)

ARTH 630 Directed Reading Course.

(3) Directed Reading Course for graduate students in Art History.

l

ARTH 641 Greek Art and Archaeology 1.

(3)

l

ARTH 642 Greek Art and Archaeology 2.

(3)

l

ARTH 643 Greek Art and Archaeology 3.

(3)

l

ARTH 646 Medieval Art and Archaeology.

(3)

l

ARTH 647 Art of the Italian Renaissance.

(3)

ARTH 648 Art of the Italian Renaissance.

(3)

l

ARTH 653 Baroque Art and Architecture.

(3)

ARTH 654 Baroque Art and Architecture.

(3)

l

ARTH 655 Baroque Art and Architecture.

(3)

l

ARTH 656 19th Century Painting and Sculpture.

(3)

ARTH 657 19th Century Painting and Sculpture.

(3)

l

ARTH 660 Contemporary Art and Criticism.

(3)

ARTH 661 Contemporary Art and Criticism.

(3)

l

ARTH 673 Renaissance and Post-Renaissance 1.

(3)

l

ARTH 674 Renaissance and Post-Renaissance 1.

(3)

l

ARTH 675 Renaissance and Post-Renaissance 1.

(3)

l

ARTH 678 Renaissance and Post-Renaissance 2.

(3)

l

ARTH 679 Roman Art and Archaeology 1.

(3)

ARTH 687 Problems in Western Medieval Architecture and Sculpture.

(3)

ARTH 698 Thesis Research 1.

(12) (Restriction: No credit will be given for this course unless both ARTH 698 and ARTH 699 are successfully completed.) For the completion of thesis research.

ARTH 699 Thesis Research 2.

(12) (Prerequisite: ARTH 698.) (Restriction: No credit will be given for this course unless both ARTH 698 and ARTH 699 are successfully completed.) For the completion of thesis research.

ARTH 701 Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination.

(0)

l

ARTH 701D1 (0), ARTH 701D2 (0) Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination.

(Students must register for both ARTH 701D1 and ARTH 701D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ARTH 701D1 and ARTH 701D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ARTH 701D1 and ARTH 701D2 together are equivalent to ARTH 701)

l

ARTH 701N1 Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination.

(0) (Students must also register for ARTH 701N2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ARTH 701N1 and ARTH 701N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (ARTH 701N1 and ARTH 701N2 together are equivalent to ARTH 701)

l

ARTH 701N2 Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination.

(0) (Prerequisite: ARTH 701N1) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ARTH 701N1 and ARTH 701N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (ARTH 701N1 and ARTH 701N2 together are equivalent to ARTH 701) See ARTH 701N1 for course description.

l

ARTH 705 Thesis Methods.

(3) (Restriction: For Art History graduate students only.) The aim is to introduce the student to research methods specific to his/her area of dissertation work.

l

ARTH 714 Research: Modern Architecture - 1750 to Present.

(3)

l

ARTH 715 Research: Modern Architecture - 1750 to Present.

(3)

l

ARTH 716 Research: Modern Architecture - 1750 to Present.

(3)

l

ARTH 724 Art Criticism 2.

(3)

l

ARTH 725 Methods in Art History.

(3)

l

ARTH 730 Current Problems: Architectural History 1.

(3)

l

ARTH 731 Current Problems: Architectural History 2.

(3)

7 Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
Burnside Hall
805 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 945
Montreal, QC  H3A 2K6
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-3764
Fax: (514) 398-6115
E-mail: graduateinfo.aos@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/meteo 
Chair
J.R. Gyakum

7.1 Staff

Emeritus Professors
R.R. Rogers; B.S.(Texas), S.M.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(N.Y.)
E.J. Stansbury; M.A., Ph.D.(Tor.)
Professors
J.F. Derome; B.Sc., M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Mich.)
H.G. Leighton; B.Sc., M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Alta.)
C.A. Lin; B.Sc.(Br.Col.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
L.A. Mysak; B.Sc.(Alta.), M.Sc.(Adel.), A.M. Ph.D.(Harv.), F.R.S.C.
R. E. Stewart; B.Sc.(Man.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
M.K. Yau; S.B., S.M., Sc.D.(M.I.T.)
I.I. Zawadzki; B.Sc.(Buenos Aires), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Associate Professors
P. Bartello; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Mathematics)
J.R. Gyakum; B.Sc.(Penn.St.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
D. Straub; B.S., M.S.(SW Louisiana), Ph.D.(Wash.)
Assistant Professors
P. Ariya; B.Sc., Ph.D.(York) (William Dawson Scholar) (joint appoint. with Chemistry)
F. Fabry; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with McGill School of Environment)
Adjunct Professors
G. Brunet, S. Laroche, R. Menard, F. Saucier, A. Zadra

7.2 Programs Offered

The Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences offers courses and research opportunities in atmospheric, physical oceanographic, and climate fields leading to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees. Research programs include the main areas of atmospheric science, such as cloud and precipitation physics, dynamic meteorology, numerical weather prediction, atmospheric chemistry, radar and satellite meteorology, and mesoscale meteorology. Research projects in physical oceanography include the modelling of ocean circulations as well as studies of sea ice and paleoclimates. Some faculty members are associated with the Centre for Climate and Global Change Research, which brings together researchers from several departments to work on problems affecting the evolution of our planet, with emphasis on climate-related questions. Topics of research of this nature in the Department include large scale air/sea interaction, air/sea-ice interaction, interannual and longer term variability of the atmosphere and oceans, and cloud-radiation climate interaction.

Other faculty members are associated with the Cooperative Centre for Research in Mesometeorology which also includes researchers in several other departments at McGill, in the Département de Physique at the Université du Québec à Montréal, and in Montreal offices of the Meteorological Service of Canada. The objective of the Centre is to study the evolution, maintenance and decay of mesoscale precipitation systems. Such systems, whose sizes range from 10 to 300 km, are important for the precipitation climatology of southern Quebec.

Facilities include the J. Stewart Marshall Radar Observatory, a radar wind profiler and a laser ceilometer and several years of global atmospheric data. Graduate students have access to large and small computers, including the NEC supercomputer of the Meteorological Service of Canada.

Financial assistance in the form of research or teaching assistantships is available for all qualified graduate students.

7.3 Admission Requirements

Applicants for the M.Sc. program must meet the general requirements of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office and hold a bachelor's degree with high standing in atmospheric science, physics, mathematics, engineering, or equivalent.

The normal requirement for admission to the Ph.D. program is an M.Sc. degree in atmospheric science, physical oceanography, or related discipline with acceptably high standing. Students without a Master's degree in Atmospheric Science (Meteorology) or Physical Oceanography but with a strong background in related disciplines (physics, mathematics, engineering) may be admitted to the Ph.D. program. They enter at the Ph.D. I rather than the Ph.D. II level, and devote the first year of the program mainly to course work.

Inquiries should be addressed directly to the Chair of Admissions, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences.

McGill's on-line application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/applying/graduate.

7.4 Program Requirements

M.Sc. Degree

Depending on their background, students must take from 9 to 27 credits of courses chosen from any course offered by the Department at the 500 and 600 levels, up to but not including ATOC 691. In some instances, courses in this Department may be replaced by courses given by other departments at the 500 level or higher with the approval of the Department. Usually, students with no previous background in atmospheric science (or physical oceanography) are required to take 27 credits of courses, while students with a strong B.Sc. or Diploma in meteorology or a related field may take as few as 9 credits of courses.

Students must also complete a minimum of 24 thesis-research credits from ATOC 691, ATOC 692, ATOC 693, ATOC 694, ATOC 695, ATOC 696 and ATOC 699. All students must take seminar course ATOC 694 and complete ATOC 699. The M.Sc. degree requires a minimum of 45 credits in total. This includes course credits, a minimum of 12 thesis credits and the completion of a thesis satisfying all the requirements of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office. Normally the equivalent of 12 months of full-time work is required to obtain these thesis-research credits, in addition to the time needed for the courses mentioned in the preceding paragraph. It is possible for students to write a thesis based on research in atmospheric, oceanic, or climate topics.

M.Sc. - Computational Science and Engineering (CSE) Option
(minimum 46 credits)

Students can complete the CSE Option by including in their course selection ATOC 669D1/ATOC 669D2, plus two of CIVE 602, COMP 522, COMP 540, COMP 566, MATH 578 and MATH 579; and two other approved courses from a list available in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences but which will usually be ATOC 513 and ATOC 515. The rest of the credits are thesis courses.

Ph.D. Degree

The Ph.D. program consists of supervised research and normally a minimum of two approved courses. Candidates are required to submit a written thesis proposal, to present a Ph.D. proposal seminar and to take the Ph.D. oral comprehensive examination. The standard Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office requirements concerning a thesis must be satisfied.

7.5 Courses for Higher Degrees

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

Term(s) offered (Fall, Winter, Summer) may appear after the credit weight to indicate when a course would normally be taught. Please check Class Schedule to confirm this information.

Note:

All undergraduate courses administered by the Faculty of Science (courses at the 100- to 500-level) have limited enrolment.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.
ATOC 512 Atmospheric and Oceanic Dynamics.

(3) (Fall) (3 hours lectures) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) Introduction to the fluid dynamics of large-scale flows of the atmosphere and oceans. Stratification of atmosphere and oceans. Equations of state, thermodynamics and momentum. Kinematics, circulation, and vorticity. Hydrostatic and quasi-geostrophic flows. Brief introduction to wave motions, flow over topography, Ekman boundary layers, turbulence.

ATOC 513 Waves and Stability.

(3) (Winter) (3 hours lectures) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) Linear theory of waves in rotating and stratified media. Geostrophic adjustment and model initialization. Wave propagation in slowly varying media. Mountain waves; waves in shear flows. Barotropic, baroclinic, symmetric, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Wave-mean flow interaction. Equatorially trapped waves.

ATOC 515 Turbulence in Atmosphere and Oceans.

(3) (3 hours lectures) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: ATOC 512 or permission of instructor) Application of statistical and semi-empirical methods to the study of geophysical turbulence. Reynolds' equations, dimensional analysis, and similarity. The surface and planetary boundary layers. Oceanic mixed layer. Theories of isotropic two- and three- dimensional turbulence: energy and enstrophy inertial ranges. Beta turbulence.

ATOC 530 Climate Dynamics 1.

(3) (Fall) (3 hours lectures) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) (Restricted to Graduate students and final-year Honours Atmospheric Science students. Others by special permission.) Introduction to the components of the climate system. Review of paleoclimates. Physical processes and models of climate and climate change.

ATOC 531 Climate Dynamics 2.

(3) (Winter) (3 hours lectures) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) (Restricted to Graduate students and final-year Honours Atmospheric Science students. Others by special permission.) The general circulation of the atmosphere and oceans. Atmospheric and oceanic general circulation models. Observations and models of the El Niño and Southern Oscillation phenomena.

ATOC 540 Synoptic Meteorology 1.

(3) (Fall) (2 hours lectures; 2 hours laboratory) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) Analysis of current meteorological data. Description of a geostrophic, hydrostatic atmosphere. Ageostrophic circulations and hydrostatic instabilities. Kinematic and thermodynamic methods of computing vertical motions. Tropical and extratropical condensation rates. Barotropic and equivalent barotropic atmospheres.

ATOC 541 Synoptic Meteorology 2.

(3) (Winter) (2 hours lectures; 2 hours laboratory) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: ATOC 512 and ATOC 540 or permission of instructor) Analysis of current meteorological data. Quasi-geostrophic theory, including the omega equation, as it relates to extratropical cyclone and anticyclone development. Frontogenesis and frontal circulations in the lower and upper troposphere. Cumulus convection and its relationship to tropical and extratropical circulations. Diagnostic case study work.

ATOC 546 Current Weather Discussion.

(1) (Winter) (2 hours) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: ATOC 540 or permission of instructor) (Restricted to Graduate students and final-year Honours Atmospheric Science students. Others by special permission.) Half-hour briefing on atmospheric general circulation and current weather around the world using satellite data, radar observations, conventional weather maps, and analyses and forecasts produced by computer techniques.

ATOC 550 Special Topics Meteorology and Oceanography.

(1) (Fall) (1 hour lecture) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) (Restricted to Graduate students and final-year Honours Atmospheric Science students. Others by special permission.) Lectures and seminars on special topics such as hydrology, agricultural meteorology, the limits of predictability, planetary atmospheres, atmospheric and oceanic pollution, coastal currents, and research reviews.

l

ATOC 558 Numerical Methods and Laboratory.

(3) (Winter) (1 hour lecture; 4 hours laboratory) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) (Restricted to Graduate students and final-year Honours Atmospheric Science students. Others by special permission.)

ATOC 568 Ocean Physics.

(3) (Winter) (3 hours lectures) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: ATOC 512 or permission of instructor) (Restricted to Graduate students and final-year Honours Atmospheric Science students. Others by special permission.) Research methods in physical oceanography including data analysis and literature review. Course will be divided into five separate modules focussing on temperature-salinity patterns, ocean circulation, boundary layers, wave phenomena and tides.

l

ATOC 616 Topics - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics.

(3) (3 hours) Advanced topics in the dynamics of oceanic and atmospheric flows.

l

ATOC 619 Atmospheric Chemistry.

(4) (3 hours) (Prerequisites: CHEM 213, CHEM 273, MATH 222 and MATH 315 or equivalents, or permission of instructor) (Restriction(s): Offered in odd years. Students should register in CHEM 619 in even years. Not open to students who have taken or are taking ATOC 419, CHEM 419, or CHEM 619)

ATOC 620 Physical Meteorology 1.

(3) (2 hours) Thermodynamics of the atmosphere. Instability and convection. Solar and terrestrial radiation. Radiative transfer. Radiation budgets.

ATOC 621 Physical Meteorology 2.

(3) (2 hours) Atmospheric aerosols, nucleation of water and ice. Formation and growth of cloud droplets and ice crystals. Initiation of precipitation. Severe storms and hail. Weather modification. Numerical cloud models.

l

ATOC 626 Atmospheric/Oceanic Remote Sensing.

(3) (3 hours)

l

ATOC 646 Mesoscale Meteorology.

(3) (3 hours)

ATOC 666 Topics In Ocean Circulation.

(3) (3 hours) Recent observations of mesoscale and large-scale ocean circulation. Inverse methods and their application to tracer distributions and deep ocean circulation. Review of modern theoretical developments such as geostrophic turbulence, homogenization of potencial vorticity, ventilated thermoclines, wind and buoyancy driven ocean circulation models, and coupled ice-ocean circulation models.

ATOC 670 Reading Course: Meteorology 1.

(3) Assigned reading of a specialized topic in meteorology with formal evaluation.

ATOC 671 Reading Course: Meteorology 2.

(3) Assigned reading of a specialized topic in meteorology with formal evaluation.

ATOC 672 Reading Course: Oceanography 1.

(3) Assigned reading of a specialized topic in oceanography with formal evaluation.

ATOC 673 Reading Course: Oceanography 2.

(3) Assigned reading of a specialized topic in oceanography with formal evaluation.

ATOC 691 Master's Thesis Literature Review.

(3) Review of relevant literature in preparation for the M.Sc. research.

ATOC 692 Master's Thesis Research 1.

(6) Independent research under the supervision of the student's M.Sc. supervisor.

ATOC 692N1 Master's Thesis Research 1.

(3) (Students must also register for ATOC 692N2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ATOC 692N1 and ATOC 692N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (ATOC 692N1 and ATOC 692N2 together are equivalent to ATOC 692) Independent research under the supervision of the student's M.Sc. supervisor.

l

ATOC 692N2 Master's Thesis Research 1.

(3) (Prerequisite: ATOC 692N1) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ATOC 692N1 and ATOC 692N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (ATOC 692N1 and ATOC 692N2 together are equivalent to ATOC 692) See ATOC 692N1 for course description.

ATOC 693 Master's Thesis Research 2.

(6) Independent research under the supervision of the student's M.Sc. supervisor.

ATOC 693N1 Master's Thesis Research 2.

(3) (Students must also register for ATOC 693N2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ATOC 693N1 and ATOC 693N2 are successfully completed in the same calendar year) (ATOC 693N1 and ATOC 693N2 together are equivalent to ATOC 693) Independent research under the supervision of the student's M.Sc. supervisor.

l

ATOC 693N2 Master's Thesis Research 2.

(3) (Prerequisite: ATOC 693N1) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ATOC 693N1 and ATOC 693N2 are successfully completed in the same calendar year) (ATOC 693N1 and ATOC 693N2 together are equivalent to ATOC 693) See ATOC 693N1 for course description.

ATOC 694 Master's Thesis Progress Report and Seminar.

(3) Written report on the M.Sc. research progress and oral presentation of the report in seminar form to staff and students.

ATOC 695 Master's Thesis Research 3.

(6) Independent research under the supervision of the student's M.Sc. supervisor.

ATOC 696 Master's Thesis Research 4.

(6) Independent research under the supervision of the student's M.Sc. supervisor.

ATOC 699 Master's Thesis.

(12) Independent research under the supervision of the student's M.Sc. supervisor leading to the M.Sc. thesis.

ATOC 699N1 Master's Thesis.

(6) (Students must also register for ATOC 699N2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ATOC 699N1 and ATOC 699N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (ATOC 699N1 and ATOC 699N2 together are equivalent to ATOC 699) Independent research under the supervision of the student's M.Sc. supervisor leading to the M.Sc. thesis.

l

ATOC 699N2 Master's Thesis.

(6) (Prerequisite: ATOC 699N1) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ATOC 699N1 and ATOC 699N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (ATOC 699N1 and ATOC 699N2 together are equivalent to ATOC 699) See ATOC 699N1 for course description.

ATOC 700 Ph.D. Proposal Seminar.

(1)

ATOC 701 Ph.D. Comprehensive (General).

(0)

ATOC 701D1 (0), ATOC 701D2 (0) Ph.D. Comprehensive (General).

(Students must register for both ATOC 701D1 and ATOC 701D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ATOC 701D1 and ATOC 701D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ATOC 701D1 and ATOC 701D2 together are equivalent to ATOC 701)

l

ATOC 751 Seminar: Physical Meteorology.

(6)

ATOC 751D1 (3), ATOC 751D2 (3) Seminar: Physical Meteorology.

(Students must register for both ATOC 751D1 and ATOC 751D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ATOC 751D1 and ATOC 751D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ATOC 751D1 and ATOC 751D2 together are equivalent to ATOC 751) Seminars on topics in physical meteorology. Students are required to present one or more seminars during the year on their thesis research and to participate actively in the seminars given by others.

ATOC 752D1 (0.5), ATOC 752D2 (0.5) Atmospheric, Oceanic and Climate Dynamics.

(Students must register for both ATOC 752D1 and ATOC 752D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ATOC 752D1 and ATOC 752D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Seminars on topics in atmospheric, oceanic and climate dynamics. Students are required to present one or more seminars during the year on their thesis research and to participate actively in the seminars given by others.

8 Biochemistry

Department of Biochemistry
McIntyre Medical Sciences Building
3655 Promenade Sir-William-Osler
Montreal, QC  H3G 1Y6
Canada 
Telephone: 
	Admissions Information (514) 398-1898
	Student Affairs Officer (514) 398-7266
Fax: (514) 398-7384
E-mail: admissions.biochemistry@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/biochemistry 
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/biochemistry/chemicalbiology 
Chair
David Y. Thomas

8.1 Staff

Emeritus Professors
Angus F. Graham; M.Sc., Ph.D., D.Sc.(Edin.), F.R.S.C.
Rose M. Johnstone; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.S.C.
Samuel Solomon; M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.S.C.
Theodore L. Sourkes; M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(C'nell), F.R.S.C.
Professors
Rhoda Blostein; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Nicole Beauchemin; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Montr.) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Philip E. Branton; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.) (Gilman Cheney Professor of Biochemistry)
Peter E. Braun; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Br.Col.), Ph.D.(Berk.)
Vincent Giguère; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Laval) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Philippe Gros; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(McG.) (James McGill Professor)F.R.S.C.
Annette A. Herscovics; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.S.C. (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Robert E. MacKenzie; B.Sc.(Agr.) (McG.), M.N.S., Ph.D.(C'nell)
Edward A. Meighen; B.Sc.(Alta.), Ph.D.(Berk.)
William Muller; B.Sc.,Ph.D.(McG.)
Walter E. Mushynski; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Morag Park; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Glas.) (William Dawson Scholar)(joint appoint. with Oncology)
Jerry Pelletier; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Gordon C. Shore; B.Sc.(Guelph), Ph.D.(McG.)
Joseph Shuster; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Calif.), M.D.(Alta.)
John R. Silvius; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Alta.)
Nahum Sonenberg; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Weizmann Inst.) F.R.S.C. (James McGill Professor)
Clifford P. Stanners; B.Sc.(McM.), M.A., Ph.D.(Tor.) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
David Y. Thomas; B.Sc.(Bristol), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Univ. College, Lond.), F.R.S.C.
Michel L. Tremblay; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Sher.), Ph.D.(McM.)
Maria Zannis-Hadjopoulos; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Associate Professors
Albert Berghuis; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Rijks Univ. Groningen, The Netherlands), Ph.D.(UBC)
Kalle Gehring; M.Sc.(Mich.), Ph.D.(Berk.)
Alain Nepveu; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Sher.) (joint appoint. with Oncology)
Arnim Pause; B.Sc., M.Sc.(U. Konstanz, Germ.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Assistant Professor
Maxime Bouchard; B.Sc.,Ph.D. (Laval)
Imed Gallouzi; Maîtrise, DEA, Ph.D.(Montpellier, France)
Jason Young;B.Sc.(Tor.),Ph.D.(McM.)
Associate Members
Karine Auclair (Chemistry), John J. Bergeron (Anatomy and Cell Biology), Katherine Cianflone (Exp. Medicine, RVH), Mark A. Featherstone (Oncology), William C. Galley (Chemistry), Michael Hallett (Computer Science), Peter J. Roughley (Shriners' Hosp.), Erwin Schurr (Exp. Medicine, RVH), Charles Scriver (Pediatrics, MCH), Bernard Turcotte (Exp. Medicine, RVH), Simon Wing (Medicine), Xiang-Jiao Yang (Mol. Oncol., RVH)
Adjunct Professors
Prabhat Arya (NRC, Steacie Inst. for Mol. Sciences); Michael Cordingley (Boehringer-Ingelheim); Mirek Cygler (NRC/BRI); Jacques Drouin (Clin. Res. Inst.); Karen Meerovitch (Phytobiotech); Donald Nicholson (Merck Frosst); Maureen D. O'Connor-McCourt (NRC/BRI); Enrico Purisima (NRC/BRI); Sophie Roy (Merck Frosst); Marc Therrien (Clin.Res.Inst.)

8.2 Programs Offered

The Department of Biochemistry offers training at both the M.Sc. and Ph.D. levels. There are a wide variety of areas in which specialized training for the Ph.D. can be obtained. The Department also offers the Chemical Biology Interdisciplinary Graduate Option, together with the Departments of Chemistry and Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Students interested in training in this option must first be accepted for graduate studies by one of the participating departments. Information on this option can be found at the following web address: www.mcgill.ca/biochemistry/chemicalbiology.

The Department concentrates on the following key areas of research: signal transduction; molecular genetics; gene regulation; oncogenes; structure, function and regulation of proteins; membrane structure, function and assembly; intracellular protein targeting; embryonic development; bioinformatics; chemical biology and cellular neurobiology. A summary of the research interest of faculty members is available on the Department's Website.

Funding

Prospective students are urged to make every effort to secure their own funding. All students accepted to the program must be financially supported either by their supervisor or through studentships or fellowships. Applications may be made for a variety of fellowships administered by the University or by various private, provincial or federal agencies. Deadlines for completion of most fellowship applications vary from October to February for studies beginning the following September. For more information on fellowships and awards, see the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office Web site www.mcgill.ca/gps.

8.3 Admission Requirements

Admission is based on the candidate's academic record, letters of recommendation, curriculum vitae and personal statement. A minimum grade point average of 3.2/4.0 (B+) is required. Files that do not meet the minimum requirement will not be considered.

Master's Program

Candidates for the M.Sc. degree must hold a B.Sc. degree or its equivalent in Biochemistry or in related disciplines (e.g., biology, chemistry, physics, physiology, microbiology).

Doctoral Program

Candidates who have completed their M.Sc. degree may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program. Candidates who are admitted to the M.Sc. program and who are interested in the Ph.D. may transfer directly to the Ph.D. program after successfully completing the transfer seminar (BIOC 701) and all course requirements. The M.Sc. thesis requirement is then waived.

International Applicants

International students whose language of instruction is not English must submit the following documents in order to be considered for admission:

TOEFL: Minimum score of 600 (250 on computer-based test). 
GRE: Subject Test in Biochemistry, Cell and Molecular Biology
with a minimum score of 550. 

Admissions Requirements - Chemical Biology Option

As for the regular graduate programs of the participating departments, acceptance into the Chemical Biology Option consists of two steps:

1.	Preliminary approval by the Department's Graduate Commit-
tee based on the student's transcript, references and other 
documents submitted with the application. The criteria for 
assessment at this level are the same as for the regular grad-
uate programs of the participating departments.  
2.	Acceptance by an individual research director. For students 
wishing to participate in the Chemical Biology Option, the 
director must propose a research project for the student that 
provides training in the methods and philosophy of chemical 
biology. Project proposals are assessed by the Chemical 
Biology Program Committee.  

8.4 Application Procedures

Applications will be considered upon receipt of:

All information is to be submitted to the Admissions Officer, Department of Biochemistry. All applicants are encouraged to approach staff members during or before the application process since no students are accepted without a supervisor.

McGill's on-line application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/applying/graduate.

Deadlines

Applications should be submitted as early as possible in order to meet the following deadlines:

Canadian applicants: March 1 for September admission
July 1 for January admission
International applicants: November 1 for September admission
April 1 for January admission

8.5 Program Requirements

Coursework

All students are required to complete a minimum of 6 course credits as part of their M.Sc. or Ph.D. program. The Graduate Admissions Committee may stipulate additional course work depending on the background of the candidate. Unless stipulated on the decision form, students, after consultation with their research director and with the approval of the Chair of the Graduate Admissions Committee, may choose their courses from those offered by Biochemistry, Experimental Medicine, Biology, Chemistry, Physiology as well as other graduate and advanced undergraduate courses in the medical and allied sciences. The following courses are required for those who have not completed an equivalent: BIOC 450 Protein Structure and Function, and BIOC 454 Nucleic Acids.

Departmental Seminars:

Members of the staff and visiting scientists present their work to the Department at weekly and bi-weekly intervals respectively throughout the academic year. Graduate students are required to attend all the above seminars and other informal seminars, and are encouraged to attend meetings of scientific communities.

Master's Program

The M.Sc. program is comprised of 45 credits:

BIOC 696
(3)
Research Seminar
BIOC 697
(9)
Thesis Research 1
BIOC 698
(12)
Thesis Research 2
BIOC 699
(15)
Thesis Research 3
and a minimum 6 credits of course credits, as specified above.

Additional courses may be required, depending on the student's background.

The M.Sc. program usually requires a minimum of two years of study. Students in the M.Sc. program are required to complete all course requirements and submit a thesis.

Doctoral Program

The requirements for the doctorate are: successful completion of the mimimum of 6 course credits specified above, plus any additional course work stipulated by the Graduate Admissions Commitee; the comprehensive oral exams; submission of a thesis, and its oral defence.

Transfer to the Ph.D.

After 21 months students may transfer to the Ph.D. program only if all transfer requirements have been fulfilled. This includes completion of BIOC 701 and the mimimum of 6 course credits specified above, plus any additional course work stipulated by the Graduate Admissions Commitee. The M.Sc. thesis requirement is then waived.

Comprehensive Oral Exams

All students who plan to proceed to the Ph.D. degree, as well as students entering at the Ph.D. level, must present and pass the following comprehensive oral exams, listed as courses:
BIOC 701 Research Seminar 1
BIOC 702 Ph.D. Thesis Proposal
BIOC 703 Research Seminar 2.

Program Requirements - Chemical Biology Option

The curriculum of the Chemical Biology Option is structured so that in completing the option, students also complete the course requirements for the regular graduate programs in their home departments. For this reason, program requirements are listed separately for each department, even though the 'core' content in Chemical Biology (9 lecture credits plus 2 or 4 seminar credits for each program) is the same for each. The course requirements for the Chemical Biology Option taken through the Biochemistry Department are available at www.mcgill.ca/biochemistry/chemicalbiology.

8.6 Graduate Courses

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

Term(s) offered (Fall, Winter, Summer) may appear after the credit weight to indicate when a course would normally be taught. Please check Class Schedule to confirm this information.

Note:

All undergraduate courses administered by the Faculty of Science (courses at the 100- to 500-level) have limited enrolment.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.
BIOC 503 Immunochemistry.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisites: BIOC 311, BIOC 312) This course, presented in lecture format, emphasizes the molecular, genetic and structure function events that occur in the humoral immune response. Interleukins and other mediators of inflammation, a field in which rapid changes are occurring, are discussed. The clinical significance of fundamental biochemical findings is described.

l

BIOC 603 Recent Advances in Molecular Genetics.

(3) (Prerequisites: BIOC 454 and permission of instructor.) Recent advances in our understanding of gene function and its control in normal and diseased cellular systems will be discussed in depth. Course given based on minimum registration of 10 students. Contact Student Affairs Officer for information.

H
BIOC 604 Macromolecular Structure.

(3) (Prerequisite: BIOC 450 or equivalent) (Lectures in French and English) X-Ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, computational methods and theoretical approaches to the determination and analysis of macromolecular structures. Theory and practical applications will be covered. Examples will include interpretation of structure as it applies to biological functions. In conjunction with the Université de Montréal.

BIOC 610 Seminars in Chemical Biology 1.

(1) (Restrictions: Open only to students registered for the M.Sc. or Ph.D. Graduate Option in Chemical Biology.) First multidisciplinary seminar in chemical biology.

BIOC 611 Seminars in Chemical Biology 3.

(1) (Restrictions: Open only to students registered for the M.Sc. or Ph.D. Graduate Option in Chemical Biology.) Third multidisciplinary seminar in chemical biology.

BIOC 695 Thesis Research 1 (Chemical - Biology)

(6) (Restrictions: Open only to students registered for the M.Sc. Graduate Option in Chemical Biology.) Research toward completion of thesis.

BIOC 696 Research Seminar.

(3) (Open to M.Sc. Biochemistry students only.) Compulsory participation in the departmental seminar series. Graded pass/fail, based on participation.

BIOC 697 Thesis Research 1.

(9)

BIOC 698 Thesis Research 2.

(12)

BIOC 699 Thesis Research 3.

(15)

BIOC 701 Research Seminar 1.

(0) (Biochemistry graduate students) Presentation on original current laboratory research carried out by student.

BIOC 702 Ph.D. Thesis Proposal.

(0) (Biochemistry graduate students) Dissertion presented to Committee.

BIOC 703 Research Seminar 2.

(0) (Ph.D. students in Biochemistry) Presentation of the planned thesis including central findings and original contribution to knowledge in the field of research.

EXMD 615 Membrane Carbohydrates.

(3) The structure, function and biosynthesis of glycoproteins, glycolipids and glycoaminoglycans, and the biological role of complex carbohydrates at the cell surface.

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

BIOC 311 Metabolic Biochemistry.

(3) (Fall) (Prerequisites: BIOL 200, BIOL 201 or BIOC 212, CHEM 222) The generation of metabolic energy in higher organisms with an emphasis on its regulation at the molecular, cellular and organ level. Chemical concepts and mechanisms of enzymatic catalysis are also emphasized. Included: selected topics in carbohydrate, lipid and nitrogen metabolism; complex lipid and biological membranes; hormonal signal transduction.

BIOC 312 Biochemistry of Macromolecules.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisites: BIOC 311, BIOL 200, BIOL 201 or BIOC 212) Gene expression from the start of transcription to the synthesis of proteins, their modifications and degradation. Topics covered: purine and pyrmidine metabolism; transcription and its regulation; mRNA processing; translation; targetting of proteins to specific cellular sites; protein glycosylation; protein phosphorylation; protein turn-over; programmed cell death (apoptosis).

BIOC 404 Biophysical Chemistry.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisites: CHEM 204, CHEM 214 or equivalent) (Not open to students who have taken 180-404) Hydrodynamic and electrophoretic methods for separation and characterization of macromolecules. Optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of biopolymers, and applications to biological systems.

BIOC 450 Protein Structure and Function.

(3) (Fall) (Prerequisites: BIOC 311, BIOC 312 and/or sufficient organic chemistry. Intended primarily for students at the U3 level) Primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of enzymes. Active site mapping and site-specific mutagenesis of enzymes. Enzyme kinetics and mechanisms of catalysis. Multienzyme complexes.

BIOC 454 Nucleic Acids.

(3) (Fall) (Prerequisites: BIOC 311, BIOC 312 or permission of instructor) Chemistry of RNA and DNA, transcription and splicing of RNA and their control; enzymology of DNA replication. Special topics on transgenics, genetic diseases and cancer.

BIOC 455 Neurochemistry.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisites: BIOC 311, BIOC 312 or permission of instructor) Covers biochemical mechanisms underlying central nervous system function. Introduces basic neuroanatomy, CNS cell types and morphology, neuronal excitability, chemically mediated transmission, glial function. Biochemistry of specific neurotransmitters, endocrine effects on brain, brain energy metabolism and cerebral ischemia (stroke). With examples, where relevant, of biochemical processes disrupted in human CNS disease.

BIOC 458 Membranes and Cellular Signaling.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisites: BIOC 212, ANAT 262; one of PHGY 201, PHGY 209 or BIOL 205; one of BIOC 312 or ANAT 365; and BIOC 311 or permission of instructors) (This course is also listed as ANAT 458. Not open to students who have taken or are taking ANAT 458 or BIOC 456) An integrated treatment of the properties of biological membranes and of intracellular signaling, including the major role that membranes play in transducing and integrating cellular regulatory signals. Biological membrane organization and dynamics: membrane transport; membrane receptors and their associated effectors; mechanisms of regulation of cell growth, morphology, differentiation and death.

9 Bioethics

For information, write to:
Chair, Master's Specialization in Bioethics
Biomedical Ethics Unit
3647 Peel Street
Montreal, QC  H3A 1X1
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-6980 
Fax: (514) 398-8349
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/biomedicalethicsunit/masters 

9.1 Staff

E. Bereza; B.A., M.D.,C.M.(McG.), C.C.F.P.(C)
R. Crouch; B.A., M.A. (McG.)
C. Ells; R.R.T(VGH), M.A., Ph.D.(Tenn.)
K.C. Glass; A.M.(Chic.), LL.B., B.C.L., D.C.L.(McG.)
N. Gilmore; B.A.(College of the Holy Cross), Ph.D.(Lond.), M.D.(Vt.)
D. Jones; B.A.(Yale), J.D.(Harv.)
L. Turner; B.A.(Winn.), M.A.(Manit.), M.A., Ph.D.(S.Calif.)

9.2 Programs Offered

Master's Specialization in Bioethics.

The Master's Specialization in Bioethics is sponsored by the: 
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Experimental Medicine;
Faculty of Law; 
Faculty of Religious Studies; and 
Faculty of Arts, Department of Philosophy.  

Students receive an M.A., LL.M. or M.Sc. degree in the discipline chosen with a specialization in Bioethics.

9.3 Admission Requirements

M.D., bachelor's level professional training in a health science, or bachelor's degree in law, philosophy or religious studies. Other students may be considered on an individual basis.

Enrolment is limited to 12 students.

9.4 Application Procedures

Applications are made initially through the Biomedical Ethics Unit in the Faculty of Medicine, which administers the program and teaches the core courses.

Applicants must be accepted by the appropriate Faculty, the Bioethics Graduate Studies Advisory Committee, and the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office.

McGill's on-line application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/applying/graduate.

9.5 Program Requirements

The curriculum is composed of required courses (for 6 credits) offered in the Biomedical Ethics Unit, bioethics courses (3 credits minimum) offered by the base faculty or department and any graduate courses required or accepted by a base faculty for the granting of a Master's degree, for a total of 21 credits. A minimum of 45 credits is required including the thesis.

Registration Requirements: Depending upon the requirements of the base discipline, a minimum of three terms is required for completion of the program, including course work and thesis.

Thesis Supervision: Thesis supervision for students in the specialization is provided by a participating faculty member in the program. Thesis examination will be conducted according to the base discipline and the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office norms.

Required Courses - Biomedical Ethics Unit
(6 credits)
BIOE 680
(3)
Bioethical Theory
BIOE 681
(3)
Bioethics Practicum
Required Course - base faculty
(3 credits)
one of the following:
BIOE 682
(3)
Medical Basis of Bioethics
CMPL 642
(3)
Law and Health Care
PHIL 543
(3)
Seminar: Medical Ethics
RELG 571
(3)
Religion and Medicine
Complementary Courses
(12 credits)
the remaining credits are to be taken in any graduate courses required or accepted by the base faculty for the granting of a Master's degree
Thesis Component - Required
(24 credits)
BIOE 690
(3)
Thesis Literature Survey
BIOE 691
(3)
Thesis Research Proposal
BIOE 692
(6)
Thesis Research Progress Report
BIOE 693
(12)
Thesis

9.6 Courses

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

BIOE 680 Bioethical Theory (3)

(Limited enrolment) A survey of some of the main problem areas and common argument forms used in current bioethics. Problem areas include consent, decions to withhold or withdraw treatment, allocation of scarce resources, research with human subjects and confidentiality. Argument forms include those drawn from diverse ethical theories and traditions.

BIOE 681 Bioethics Practicum.

(3) (Limited enrolment) Four hours per week supervised placement within health care settings (e.g., intensive care, family practice, clinical ethics committees). In addition, students shall be assigned for the last month of the term to a single intensive placement. Participation in rounds, case discussions, and a weekly seminar.

BIOE 690 M.Sc. Thesis Literature Survey.

(3)

BIOE 691 M.Sc. Thesis Research Proposal.

(3)

BIOE 692 M.Sc. Thesis Research Progress Report.

(6)

l

BIOE 692D1 (3), BIOE 692D2 (3) M.Sc. Thesis Research Progress Report.

(Students must register for both BIOE 692D1 and BIOE 692D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both BIOE 692D1 and BIOE 692D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (BIOE 692D1 and BIOE 692D2 together are equivalent to BIOE 692)

BIOE 693 M.Sc. Thesis.

(12)

BIOE 693D1 (6), BIOE 693D2 (6) M.Sc. Thesis.

(Students must register for both BIOE 693D1and BIOE 693D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both BIOE 693D1 and BIOE 693D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (BIOE 693D1 and BIOE 693D2 together are equivalent to BIOE 693)

l

BIOE 694 Independent Studies 3.

(3)

Base Faculty Courses

BIOE 682 Medical Basis of Bioethics.

(3) (Limited enrolment.) The seminar examines the medical basis of timely ethical dilemmas in health care. Content includes: clinical concepts of pathogenesis, disease, screening, diagnosis, therapeutic interventions and prognosis; decision-making in clinical care and institutional policy development; organization of health care systems including socialized medicine, public health and institutions providing health care; medical research.

l

CMPL 642 Law and Health Care.

(3) (Limited enrolment.) Topics in this seminar will include philosophical and ethical foundations of law as applied in medicine, legal structures and their impact on health care, law and ethics of the health care professions, administrative and legal control of health care systems and other selected issues.

PHIL 543 Seminar: Medical Ethics.

(3) (Prerequisite: PHIL 343 or written permission of the instructor) (Seminars are open only to graduate students and final year Philosophy Majors, Honours and Joint Honours students, except by written permission of the Department) An advanced course devoted to a particular philosophical problem as it arises in the context of medical practice or the application of medical technology.

RELG 571 Religion and Medicine.

(3) (Winter) A study of the resources of major world religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism and Shinto) for thinking about ethical issues related to modern medicine, e.g., health, illness, suffering; new reproductive technologies; genetic engineering; euthanasia; palliative care; animal research; transplants.

10 Biology

Department of Biology
Stewart Biology Building
1205 Avenue Docteur Penfield
Montreal, QC  H3A 1B1
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-6400
Fax: (514) 398-5069
E-mail: gradinfo.biology@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/biology 
Chair
Paul F. Lasko
Chair of Graduate Program
Robert Levine

10.1 Staff

Emeritus Professors
Robert L. Carroll; B.S. (Mich), M.A., Ph.D. (Harv.), F.R.S.C.
F. Clarke Fraser; O.C., B.Sc.(Acad.), M.Sc., Ph.D., M.D., C.M.(McG.), D.Sc.(Acad.), F.R.S.C., F.R.C.P.S.(C) (Molson Emeritus Professor of Genetics) (joint appoint. with Human Genetics)
Sarah P. Gibbs; A.B., M.S.(C'nell), Ph.D.(Harv.), F.R.S.C. (Macdonald Emeritus Professor of Botany)
Jacob Kalff; M.S.A.(Tor.), Ph.D.(Ind.)
John B. Lewis; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Gordon A. Maclachlan; B.Sc., M.A.(Sask.), Ph.D.(Man.), F.R.S.C. (Macdonald Emeritus Professor of Botany)
Barid B. Mukherjee; B.Sc.(Calc.), M.S.(Brig.Young), Ph.D.(Utah) (joint appoint. with Human Genetics)
Rolf O. Sattler; B.Sc.(Tübingen), Ph.D.(Munich), F.R.S.C.
Professors
Graham A.C. Bell; B.A., D.Phil.(Oxon), F.R.S.C. (James McGill Professor)
Gregory G. Brown; B.Sc.(Notre Dame), Ph.D.(N.Y.)
A. Howard Bussey; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Brist.), F.R.S.C. (on leave
2003-04)
Ronald Chase; A.B.(Stan.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
Rajinder S. Dhindsa; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Punj.), Ph.D.(Wash.)
Donald L. Kramer; B.Sc.(Boston Coll.), Ph.D.(U.B.C.)
Paul F. Lasko; A.B.(Harv.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.) (Molson Professor of Genetics) (joint appoint. with Anatomy & Cell Biology)
Martin J. Lechowicz; B.A.(Mich. St.), M.S., Ph.D.(Wis.)
Louis Lefebvre; B.Sc., M.A., Ph.D. (Montr.)
Ronald J. Poole; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Birm.)
Catherine Potvin; B.Sc., M.Sc. (Montr.), Ph.D. (Duke)
Rima Rozen; B.Sc.,PhD.(McG.) (James McGill Professor)
Daniel J. Schoen; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Mich.), Ph.D.(Calif.) (Macdonald Professor of Botany)(on leave)
Associate Professors
Thomas E. Bureau; B.Sc.(Calif), Ph.D.(Texas) (William Dawson Scholar)
François Fagotto; Ph.D.(Neuchâtel)
Gregor Fussman; Diploma (Berlin), Ph.D. (Max-Planck-Institute)
Andrew Gonzalez; B.Sc. (U. Nott.), Ph.D. (Lond.)
Siegfried Hekimi; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Geneva)
Louis Lefebvre; B.Sc., M.A., Ph.D.(Montr.)
Robert L. Levine; B.Sc.(Brooklyn), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Yale)
Yutaka Nishioka; B.A., M.A.(Tokyo), Ph.D.(Col.)
Gerald S. Pollack; M.A., Ph.D.(Prin.)
Catherine Potvin; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Duke)
Neil M. Price; B.Sc.(U.N.B.), Ph.D.(U.B.C.)
Joseph Rasmussen; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Alta.), Ph.D.(Cal.)
Beat Suter; Dip., Ph.D.(Zur)(on leave)
Assistant Professors
Ehab Abouheif; M.Sc.(C'dia), Ph.D.(Duke)(on leave 2003-04)
Joseph Dent; B.Sc.(Mich), Ph.D.(Colo.)
Irene Gregory-Eaves; B.Sc. (Vic., B.C.), M.Sc., Ph.D. (Queen's)
Frédéric Guichard; B.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(Laval)
Christian Hardtke; M.Sc., Ph.D.(Munich)
Paul Harrison; B.Sc. (National Univ. of Ireland), Ph.D. (Lond.)
Andrew Hendry; B.Sc.(Vic.,B.C.) M.Sc., Ph.D.(Wash)
Rudiger Krahe; Diploma (Alexander U.), Ph.D. (Humboldt)
Kevin McCann; B.A.(Dart), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Guelph)
Laura Nilson; B.A.(Colgate), Ph.D.(Yale) (Canada Research Chair in Developmental Genetics)
Richard Roy; B.Sc.(Bishop's), Ph.D.(Laval)
Frieder Schoeck; Diploma (Erhangen), Ph.D. (Max Planck Institute)
Jacalyn Vogel; M.Sc.(E.Ill.), Ph.D.(Kansas)
Tamara Western; B.Sc. (Dal.), Ph.D. (Br. Col.)
Monique Zetka; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Br. Col.)
Associate Members
Salvatore Carbonetto (Montreal General Hospital), Hugh Clarke (Royal Victoria Hospital), Pierre Drapeau (Montreal General Hospital), Robert Dunn (Montreal General Hospital), Michael Ferns (Montreal General Hospital), David Green (Redpath Museum), Kenneth Hastings (Montreal Neurological Inst.), Paul Holland (Montreal Neurological Inst.), Roberta Palmour (Allan Memorial Inst.itute), Anthony Ricciardi (Redpath Museum), David Rosenblatt (Royal Victoria Hospital), Guy Rouleau (Montreal General Hospital), Charles R. Scriver (Montreal Children's Hospital Research Inst.), Teruko Taketo (Royal Victoria Hospital), Harriet S. Tenenhouse (Montreal Children's Hospital Research Inst.), David Y. Thomas (Biochemistry Dept.)
Adjunct Professors
Eldredge Bermingham (STRI), Allen Herre (STRI), Wayne Hunte (U. West Indies), Benoit S. Landry (DNA Landmarks), William F. Laurance (STRI), Malcom S. Whiteway (Bio Tech Inst.)

10.2 Programs Offered

The Department offers graduate training in many areas of biology with particular strengths in Molecular Genetics and Development, Evolutionary and Behavioural Ecology, Human Genetics, Limnology, Marine Biology, Neurobiology, and Experimental Plant Biology.

Graduate programs leading to the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees are offered. The emphasis in both programs is on development of the intellectual and technical skills necessary for independent research. The main component of both degrees is a thesis embodying the results of original research. Formal course requirements are few and are largely intended to fill gaps in the student's background.

The Stewart Biology Building is well equipped for graduate training and research in a wide variety of areas of biology. Its resources are greatly extended by affiliation with other organizations such as the Redpath Museum; the Groupe Interuniversitaire de Recherches Océanographiques du Québec (GIROQ); the Biotechnology Research Institute of the National Research Council of Canada; Macdonald Campus; the Montreal Neurological Institute; the Jewish General Hospital; the Montreal General, Montreal Children's and Royal Victoria Hospitals. Field research facilities include the Mont St. Hilaire Field Station (Quebec); the Huntsman Marine Science Centre (New Brunswick); the Subarctic Research Laboratory (Quebec); the Bellairs Research Institute (Barbados); and the Memphremagog Field Station (Quebec).

The Department specifies a minimum level of support for all graduate students. This amount is $13,500 per annum plus tuition fees. The required minimum duration of support is two years for the M.Sc. program, five years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D.1 (from a Bachelor's) and four years for a Ph.D. student entering as Ph.D.2.

10.3 Admission Requirements

Applicants must have a B.Sc. in a discipline relevant to the proposed field of study with an overall Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required, but may be submitted. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is required of students who have graduated from a non-English language university outside of Canada. A score of 550 on the paper-based TOEFL (213 on the computer-based test) or 6.5 on IELTS, is the minimum standard for admission.

Admission is based on an evaluation by the Graduate Training Committee and on acceptance by a research director who can provide adequate funding for personal and research expenses. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact staff members with whom they wish to study before applying for admission.

10.4 Application Procedures

Application to the graduate program in Biology may be made on a paper application form or aan on-line Web application form (a direct link to the on-line form is on the Department Web site) or a. The paper form that can be obtained directly from the Graduate Admissions Secretary. It is recommended to apply on-line.

All applicants should read the academic faculty and admission procedure sections on either the separate paper handouts or the Biology Department Web site before completing the application form. These guidelines contain specific information on the application process, summaries of the research areas of our staff and contact information.

Deadlines for applications and all supporting documents are March 1 for September admission (January 15 for international applicants) and October 15 for January admission (August 15 for international applicants). If application materials are received after these dates, it may be necessary to delay review of the applicant's file until the following admittance period. All inquiries pertaining to admission procedures should be directed to the Graduate Admissions Secretary.

McGill's on-line application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/applying/graduate.

10.5 Program Requirements

The graduate program of each student is established and regularly evaluated by a three-member supervisory committee appointed by the Graduate Training Committee and chaired by the student's thesis supervisor.

All graduate students are required to participate regularly in the various seminar series and journal clubs offered by the Department.

M.Sc. REQUIREMENTS (45 credits)
Length of Program

- Three full-time terms of resident study at McGill University is the minimum time requirement to complete the Master's degree. The normal and expected duration is two years.

Course Requirements

- Forty-five credits are required for the M.Sc. degree. Students must complete the courses BIOL 697, BIOL 698 and BIOL 699 (Master's Thesis Research 1, 2, 3). The research courses each carry a credit weight of 13 credits. In addition, six course credits are required and may be taken in Biology or in other departments and must be numbered 500 or higher. Additional course work may be required if the student's background is insufficient. A graduate pass (B- or better) is mandatory for all courses required for the M.Sc. degree.

Thesis

- In Biology, the M.Sc. degree is considered to be a research degree and the candidate must present a thesis which should contain original contributions to knowledge.

M.Sc. - NEOTROPICAL ENVIRONMENT REQUIREMENTS (48 credits)
Length of Program

- Three full-time terms of resident study at McGill University is the minimum time requirement to complete the Master's degree. The normal and expected duration is two years.

Course Requirements

- Forty-eight credits are required for this M.Sc. degree. Students must complete the courses BIOL 697, BIOL 698 and BIOL 699 (Master's Thesis Research 1, 2, 3). The research courses each carry a credit weight of 13 credits. In addition, six course credits are required from ENVR 610 and BIOL 640. Three credits must be chosen from POLI 644, SOCI 565, ENVR 611, ENVR 612, ENVR 680, BIOL 553, BIOL 641, GEOG 498, AGRI 550. Additional course work may be required if the student's background is insufficient. A graduate pass (B- or better) is mandatory for all courses required for the M.Sc. degree.

Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is also required.

Thesis

- In Biology, the M.Sc. degree is considered to be a research degree and the candidate must present a thesis which should contain original contributions to knowledge.

Transfer from M.Sc to Ph.D. Program

- The student's Supervisory Committee may recommend to the Graduate Training Committee that the student be permitted to transfer to the Ph.D. program. This is normally done at the end of the first year of the Master's program. Students who transfer into the Ph.D. program are required to take their Ph.D. Qualifying Examination within eight months of the transfer.

Ph.D. REQUIREMENTS
Length of Program

- Candidates entering Ph.D.1 must complete at least three years of full-time resident study (6 terms). The normal and expected duration of the Ph.D. program is 4-5 years. A student who has obtained a Master's degree at McGill, or at an approved institution elsewhere, and is proceeding in the same subject towards a Ph.D. degree may, upon the recommendation of the Graduate Training Committee, enter at the Ph.D.2 level.

Course Requirements

- Students are required to take 6 course credits. These courses may be taken in Biology or in other departments and must be numbered 500 or higher. Additional courses may be required if the student's background is insufficient. A graduate pass (B- or better) is mandatory for all courses required for the Ph.D. degree.

Ph.D. Qualifying Examination

- The Qualifying exam is a formal evaluation of the student's ability to proceed to the attainment of the Ph.D. Students must pass the Qualifying Examination (BIOL 700) no later than 15 months from the date of registration in the program. Students who transfer from the Master's program must take the exam within 8 months. Students who enter the Ph.D. program after completing an M.Sc. in Biology at McGill must take the exam within 12 months.

Ph.D. Seminar

- All Ph.D. students must deliver a research seminar (BIOL 702) at some time during the academic session (September-April) towards the end of their studies and preferably at least 3 months prior to the thesis submission.

Thesis

- The Ph.D. is a research degree. The candidate must present a thesis which represents high scholastic attainment in a specialized field, demonstrated by independent and original research. After the thesis has been submitted and approved, the candidate is required to orally defend their thesis in an open forum.

Ph.D. REQUIREMENTS - NEOTROPICAL ENVIRONMENT

Length of Program

- Candidates entering Ph.D.1 must complete at least three years of full-time resident study (6 terms). The normal and expected duration of the Ph.D. program is 4-5 years. A student who has obtained a Master's degree at McGill, or at an approved institution elsewhere, and is proceeding in the same subject towards a Ph.D. degree may, upon the recommendation of the Graduate Training Committee, enter at the Ph.D.2 level.

Course Requirements

- Students are required to take 6 course credits: ENVR 610 and BIOL 640. Three more credits must be chosen from POLI 644; SOCI 565, ENVR 611, ENVR 612, ENVR 680, BIOL 553, BIOL 641, GEOG 498, AGRI 550. Additional courses may be required if the student's background is insufficient. A graduate pass (B- or better) is mandatory for all courses required for the Ph.D. degree.

Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal is also required.

Ph.D. Qualifying Examination

- The Qualifying exam is a formal evaluation of the student's ability to proceed to the attainment of the Ph.D. Students must pass the Qualifying Examination (BIOL 700) no later than 15 months from the date of registration in the program. Students who transfer from the Master's program must take the exam within 8 months. Students who enter the Ph.D. program after completing an M.Sc. in Biology at McGill must take the exam within 12 months.

Ph.D. Seminar

- All Ph.D. students must deliver a research seminar (BIOL 702) at some time during the academic session (September -April) towards the end of their studies and preferably at least 3 months prior to the thesis submission.

Thesis

- The Ph.D. is a research degree. The candidate must present a thesis which represents high scholastic attainment in a specialized field, demonstrated by independent and original research. After the thesis has been submitted and approved, the candidate is required to orally defend their thesis in an open forum.

10.6 Courses

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

H Denotes courses offered in alternate years.
l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05
BIOL 650 Recent Advances in Biology 1.

(3) Directed reading, seminar and discussion courses in subjects of current interest in biological research. Intended for students working individually or in classes on selected areas under the supervision of one or more staff members. Content and form are flexible to allow the Department to meet specific student demands or needs. Such courses are arranged by consultation with individual staff.

BIOL 651 Recent Advances in Biology 2.

(3) Directed reading, seminar and discussion courses in subjects of current interest in biological research. Intended for students working individually or in classes on selected areas under the supervision of one or more staff members. Content and form are flexible to allow the Department to meet specific student demands or needs. Such courses are arranged by consultation with individual staff.

BIOL 652 Recent Advances in Biology 3.

(3) Directed reading, seminar and discussion courses in subjects of current interest in biological research. Intended for students working individually or in classes on selected areas under the supervision of one or more staff members. Content and form are flexible to allow the Department to meet specific student demands or needs. Such courses are arranged by consultation with individual staff.

BIOL 655 Laboratory Projects and Techniques 1.

(3) Directed training in selected methods used in areas of current interest in biological research. Intended for individuals or classes working in selected areas under the supervision of one or more staff members. Form and content are flexible to allow the Department to meet specific student demands and needs. Each course is arranged by consultation with individual staff.

BIOL 656 Laboratory Projects and Techniques 2.

(3) Directed training in selected methods used in areas of current interest in biological research. Intended for individuals or classes working in selected areas under the supervision of one or more staff members. Form and content are flexible to allow the Department to meet specific student demands and needs. Each course is arranged by consultation with individual staff.

BIOL 697 Master's Thesis Research 1.

(13) Independent research work under the direction of the Thesis Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee.

BIOL 698 Master's Thesis Research 2.

(13) Independent research work under the direction of the Thesis Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee.

BIOL 699 Master's Thesis Research 3.

(13) Independent research work under the direction of the Thesis Supervisor and the Supervisory Committee.

BIOL 700 Doctoral Qualifying Examination.

(0) The oral Qualifying Examination is a formal evaluation of the candidate's ability to proceed to the attainment of the Ph.D. Candidates must submit a thesis proposal in advance of the exam.

BIOL 702 Ph.D. Seminar.

(6) Doctoral candidates are required to give a public oral presentation of their major results before submitting a thesis.

Specific Courses

Note:

All undergraduate courses administered by the Faculty of Science (courses at the 100-to 500-level have limited enrolment).

Term(s) offered (Fall, Winter, Summer) may appear after the credit weight to indicate when a course would normally be taught. Please check Class Schedule to confirm this information.

l

H
BIOL 505 Diversity and Systematics Seminar.

(3) (Winter) (3 hours seminar) (Prerequisites: BIOL 215 and BIOL 304 or permission)

BIOL 516 Genetics of Development.

(3) (Winter) (3 hours lecture) (Prerequisites: BIOL 202, BIOL 300, BIOL 303; permission) (Not open to students who have taken 177-416) This course aims to examine problems, theories, and experimental evidence on several concepts of mammalian developmental processes at molecular to organogenesis levels. Most topics are in the mouse model system, where various techniques for genetic manipulation are available.

BIOL 518 Advanced Topics in Cell Biology.

(3) (Winter) (2 hours seminar) (Prerequisite: BIOL 313 and permission) Conserved processes in Eukaryotic organisms, including the cytoskeleton, the cell cycle, complex traits/disease, global analysis/bioinformatics, and innovative studies/techniques in cell biology.

BIOL 520 Gene Activity in Development.

(3) (Winter) (3 hours lecture and discussion) (Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and BIOL 303 or permission) (Not open to students who have taken 177-420) An analysis of the role and regulation of gene expression in several models of eukaryotic development. The emphasis will be on critical evaluation of recent literature concerned with molecular or genetic approaches to the problems of cellular differentiation and determination. Recent research reports will be discussed in conferences and analyzed in written critiques.

BIOL 524 Topics in Molecular Biology.

(3) (Fall) (Prerequisite: BIOL 300, BIOL 303 or permission) Recent literature in the fields of molecular genetics and molecular biology. Topics include: signal transduction, cell function, genetic diseases in eukaryotes.

H
BIOL 530 Neural Basis of Behaviour.

(3) (Winter) (1 hour lecture, 2 hours seminar) (Prerequisite: BIOL 306 or PHGY 311 or PSYC 308) (Not open to students who have taken 177-430) This course examines neural mechanisms underlying behaviour. Topics will be introduced by a lecture, supplemented by a review article. This will be followed by student seminars and/or discussions. Topics will vary according to current literature, but will likely include communication, visual behaviour, escape, orientation, neurogenetics and locomotion.

l

BIOL 531 Neurobiology Learning Memory.

(3) (Fall) (3 hours lecture and discussion) (Prerequisite: BIOL 306 or permission) (Not open to students who have taken 177-431)

BIOL 532 Developmental Neurobiology Seminar.

(3) (Winter) (1 hour lecture, 2 hours seminar) (Prerequisites: BIOL 303 and BIOL 306 or permission) Discussions of all aspects of nervous system development including pattern formation, cell lineage, pathfinding and targetting by growing axons, and neuronal regeneration. The basis for these discussions will be recent research papers and other assigned readings.

BIOL 534 Theoretical Ecology.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisites: BIOL 308 and either BIOL 309 or BIOL 373; and permission of instructor.) Advanced topics in theoretical ecology. Mathematical and computational tools available to explore the dynamical behaviour of model populations and communities. Models addressing major ecological theories: population stability, diversity and community functioning, epidemic and disturbance dynamics; spatial models, game theory, complex-system theories.

BIOL 540 Ecology of Species Invasions.

(3) (Winter) (3 hours lecture) (Prerequisite: BIOL 308 or permission of instructor) (Not open to U1 or U2 students) (Not open to students who are taking or have taken ENVR 540.) Causes and consequences of invasion, as well as risk assessment methods and management strategies for dealing with this global problem.

l

H
BIOL 544 Genetic Basis of Life Span.

(3) (Fall) (1 hour lecture, 2 hours seminar) (Prerequisites: BIOL 202, BIOL 300; BIOL 303 recommended or permission) (Not open to students who have taken 177-444) The course will consider how gene action is determining the duration of life in various organisms focusing on the strengths and limitations of the genetic approach. The course will focus particularly on model organisms such as yeast, Caenorhabditis, Drosophila and mouse, as well as on the characterization of long-lived mutants.

l

BIOL 551 Molecular Biology: Cell Cycle.

(3) (Fall) (3 hours lecture) (Prerequisites: BIOL 200, BIOL 201, BIOL 300) (Not open to students who have taken 177-451)

BIOL 553 Neotropical Environments.

(3) (Winter) (24 hours lecture and 36 hours field work over a 4-week period) (Prerequisites: HISP 218, MATH 203, and BIOL 215, or equivalents, and permission of Program Coordinator) (Corequisites: ENVR 451, GEOG 404 and SOCI 565.) (Not open to students who have taken BIOL 453) (Restriction: location in Panama. Students must register for a full semester of studies in Panama) Ecology revisited in view of tropical conditions. Exploring species richness. Sampling and measuring biodiversity. Conservation status of ecosystems, communities and species. Indigenous knowledge.

BIOL 555D1 (1.5), BIOL 555D2 (1.5) Functional Ecology of Trees.

(Prerequisites: BIOL 304, BIOL 308 or permission.) (Students must register for both BIOL 555D1 and BIOL 555D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both BIOL 555D1 and BIOL 555D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms.) (BIOL 555D1 and BIOL 555D2 together are equivalent to BIOL 555.) Discussion of the interactions among traits that underpin the survival of woody plants in diverse environments: physiology, anatomy, architecture, seasonality and phenology, reproductive ecology, life history trade-offs, and the phylogenetic basis of functional diversification.

BIOL 568 Topics on the Human Genome.

(3) (Winter) (Restriction: Not open to students who have taken BIOL 468.) Cellular and molecular approaches to characterization of the human genome.

BIOL 569 Developmental Evolution.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisites: BIOL 303 and BIOL 304; or permission of instructor.) The influence of developmental mechanisms on evolution. This course draws on recent examples from plants and invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Topics include homology, modularity, dissociation, co-option, evolutionary novelty, evolution of genetic cis-regulation, developmental constraint and evolvability, heterochrony, phenotypic plasticity, and canalization.

l

BIOL 570 Advanced Seminar in Evolution.

(3) (Winter) (3 hours seminar) (Open to undergraduates by permission) Detailed analysis of a topic in evolutionary biology, involving substantial original research.

BIOL 571 Experimental Evolution/Ecology.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisite: BIOL 435 or equivalent) (Restriction: Restricted to U3 and Graduate students.) Basic principles and processes of evolution and ecology will be demonstrated using microbial model systems. Topics include mutation, fitness, selection, adaptive radiation, properties of mixtures and community assembly.

l

H
BIOL 572 Molecular Evolution.

(3) (Fall) (3 hours lecture/seminar) (Prerequisite: BIOL 300) (Not open to students who have taken 177-472) Evolutionary change in DNA and proteins and its implications for cellular, organismal, and population/species evolution.

BIOL 575 Human Biochemical Genetics.

(3) (Winter) (Not open to students who have taken BIOL 475.) Topics on the study of human systems that have led to advances in basic biology.

H
BIOL 588 Molecular/Cellular Neurobiology.

(3) (Fall) (1 1/2 hours lecture, 1 1/2 hours seminar) (Prerequisite: BIOL 300 and BIOL 306 or permission) Discussion of fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying the general features of cellular neurobiology. An advanced course based on lectures and on a critical review of primary research papers.

l

BIOL 632 Limnology.

(3) (2 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory) (Prerequisites: BIOL 206 and/or permission) A study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of inland waters, with emphasis on their functioning as systems.

l

H
BIOL 640 Tropical Biology and Conservation.

(3) (Restricted to students enrolled in Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) or permission of the instructor).

BIOL 641 Issues in Tropical Biology.

(3) (Course will only be offered if enrolment is five students or more. Enrolment in the Neotropical Environment Option (NEO) or permission of the instructor) Advanced interdisciplinary topics relevant to environmental work in Latin America including tropical marine environmental physiology encompassing issues of pollution and toxicity, global climate change from an ecosystem and economical perspective, evolutionary ecology of tropical communities as related to the maintenance of species diversity.

11 Biomedical Engineering

Department of Biomedical Engineering
Duff Medical Building
3775 University Street
Montreal, QC  H3A 2B4
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-6736
Fax: (514) 398-7461
Web site: www.bmed.mcgill.ca 
Chair
R.E. Kearney

11.1 Staff

Professors
T.M.S. Chang; B.Sc., M.D., C.M., Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.C.P.(C) (joint appoint. with Physiology)
A.C. Evans; B.Sc.(Liv.), M.Sc.(Sur.), Ph.D.(Leeds) (joint appoint. with Neurology and Neurosurgery)
H.L. Galiana; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Otolaryngology)
R.E. Kearney; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Physiology)
Associate Professors
J.D. Bobyn; B.Sc., M.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Tor.) (joint appoint. with Surgery)
W.R.J. Funnell; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Otolaryngology)
G.B. Pike; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Neurology and Neurosurgery)
Assistant Professors
D.L. Collins; B.Sc., M.Eng, Ph.D.(McG.) (joint appoint. with Neurology and Neurosurgery)
S. Prakash, B.Sc., M.Sc.(BHU-India), Ph.D.(McG.)
M. Tabrizian, B.Sc.(Iran), M.Sc., Ph.D.(PMC-France), M.B.A.(HEC) (joint appoint. with Dentistry)
Associate Members
K. Cullen (Physiology), S. De Serres (Physical and Occupational Therapy), J. Gotman (Neurology and Neurosurgery), R. Mongrain (Mechanical Engineering), B.N. Segal (Otolaryngology), T. Steffen (Surgery), C. Thompson (Neurology and Neurosurgery)
Adjunct Professor
J.H.T. Bates (VT)
Research Associates
C. Baker, D. Guitton, A. Katsarkas

11.2 Programs Offered

The Department offers a graduate training program leading to Master's (M.Eng.) and Ph.D. degrees in Biomedical Engineering.

It provides instruction and opportunities for interdisciplinary research in the application of engineering, mathematics, and the physical sciences to problems in medicine and the life sciences. Courses are offered for graduate students in the life sciences and in engineering and the physical sciences.

Excellent laboratory facilities for basic and applied research are available in the Department and in the laboratories of associated staff located elsewhere in the Medical Faculty. The Department operates a network of high performance workstations and well-equipped mechanical and electronics workshops.

Basic research in the Department concentrates on the application of quantitative engineering analysis methods to basic biomedical research problems. Currently active areas of research include: neuromuscular and postural control, muscle mechanics, the vestibular system, oculomotor control, the auditory system, joint prosthetics, biomaterials, artificial cells and organs, and medical imaging, and bioinformatics in genomics and proteomics. Staff members are also active in more applied research related to the development of quantitative analysis tools and instruments for biomedical research. Areas of activity here include: signal analysis, system identification, modeling, simulation and parameter estimation, image processing, pattern recognition, ultrasound, and biorobotics.

11.3 Admission Requirements

See minimum admission requirements in Section 5 of the General Information section of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar.

11.4 Application Procedures

Please address enquiries directly to the Department.

McGill's on-line application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/applying/graduate.

11.5 Program Requirements

Master's degrees (M.Eng.) require students to complete a minimum of 45 credits (24 thesis credits and 21 graduate course credits).

Graduate students may also be registered through departments of Medicine, Science and Engineering, and must then fulfill the requirements for advanced degrees imposed by their respective departments.

In addition, all students are required, through course work and independent study, to achieve a degree of inter-disciplinary competence appropriate to their area of specialization.

11.6 Courses for Higher Degrees

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

BMDE 500D1 (1.5), BMDE 500D2 (1.5) Seminars in Biomedical Engineering.

(Students must register for both BMDE 500D1 and BMDE 500D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both BMDE 500D1 and BMDE 500D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)

BMDE 501 Selected Topics in Biomedical Engineering.

(3) (3-0-6) An overview of how techniques from engineering and the physical sciences are applied to the study of selected physiological systems and biological signals. Using specific biological examples, systems will be studied using: signal or finite-element analysis, system and identification, modelling and simulation, computer control of experiments and data acquisition.

BMDE 502 BME Modelling and Identification.

(3) (Prerequisites: Undergraduate basic statistics and: either BMDE 519, or Signals and Systems (e.g., ECSE 303 & ECSE 304) or equivalent) Methodologies in systems or distributed multidimentional processes. System themes include parametric vs non-parametric system representations; linear/non-linear; noise, transients and time variation; mapping from continuous to discrete models; and relevant identification approaches in continuous and discrete time formulations.

BMDE 503 Biomedical Instrumentation.

(3) (2-1-6) The principles and practice of making biological measurements in the laboratory, including theory of linear systems, data sampling, computer interfaces, basic electronic circuit design and machining.

BMDE 504 Biomaterials and Bioperformance.

(3) (3-0-0) (Restricted to graduate and final-year undergraduate students from physical, biological and medical science, and engineering.) Biological and synthetic biomaterials, medical devices, and the issues related to their bioperformance. The physicochemical characteristics of biomaterials in relation to their biocompatibility and sterilization.

BMDE 505 Cell and Tissue Engineering.

(3) (1.5 hours lecture/1.5 hours seminar per week) (Restricted to graduate and final year undergraduate students from physical, biological, and medical science, and engineering.) Application of the principles of engineering, physical, and biological sciences to modify and create cells and tissues for therapeutic applications will be discussed, as well as the industrial perspective and related ethical issues.

BMDE 519 Biomedical Signals and Systems.

(3) (2-0-8) (Prerequisites: Satisfactory standing in U3 Honours Physiology; or U3 Major in Physics-Physiology; or U3 Major Physiology-Mathematics; or permission of instructor.) An introduction to the theoretical framework, experimental techniques and analysis procedures available for the quantitative analysis of physiological systems and signals. Lectures plus laboratory work using the Biomedical Engineering computer system. Topics include: amplitude and frequency structure of signals, filtering, sampling, correlation functions, time and frequency-domain descriptions of systems.

BMDE 650 Advanced Medical Imaging.

(3) (Prerequisite: MDPH 607) Review of advanced techniques in medical imaging including: fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), functional MRI, MR angiography and quantitative flow measurement, spiral and dynamic x-ray computed tomography, 2D/3D positron emission tomography (PET), basic PET physiology, tracer kinetics, surgical planning and guidance, functional and anatomical brain mapping, 2D and 3D ultrasound imaging, and medical image processing.

BMDE 651 Orthopaedic Engineering.

(3) (Restriction: Permission of the instructor.) Science and technology related to implants used for various orthopaedic reconstructive procedures, with emphasis on artificial hip and knee joint prostheses.

BMDE 690 Thesis Research 1.

(3)

BMDE 691 Thesis Research 2.

(3)

BMDE 692 Thesis Research 3.

(3)

BMDE 693 Thesis Research 4.

(6)

BMDE 694 Thesis Research 5.

(6)

BMDE 695 Thesis Submission.

(12)

BMDE 700 Ph.D. Comprehensive.

(0)

12 Bioresource Engineering

Department of Bioresource Engineering
Macdonald Campus
21,111 Lakeshore Road
Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC  H9X 3V9
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-7774
Fax: (514) 398-8387
E-mail: robert.kok@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/agreng 
Chair
R. Kok

12.1 Staff

Emeritus Professor
R.S. Broughton; B.S.A., B.A.Sc.(Tor.), S.M.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(McG.), LL.D.(Dal.)
Professors
S. Barrington; B.Sc.(Agr. Eng.), Ph.D.(McG.)
R. Kok; B.E.Sc., Ph.D.(W.Ont.)
C.A. Madramootoo; B.Sc.(Agr. Eng.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.) (James McGill Professor)
E. McKyes; B.Eng., M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.)
S.O. Prasher; B.Tech, M.Tech.(Punj.), Ph.D.(Br.Col.) (James McGill Professor)
G.S.V. Raghavan; B.Eng.(B'lore), M.Sc.(Guelph), Ph.D.(Colo.St.) (James McGill Professor)
Associate Professors
R.B. Bonnell; B.Sc.(Geo.), B.Sc.(Agr.Eng.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Assistant Professors
M.O. Ngadi; B.Eng.(Agr.Eng.), M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Dal.Tech.)(William Dawson Scholar)
N. Wang; B.Eng.(E.E.), M.Eng.(I.E.) (Asian Institute of Technology), M.Sc.(E.E.), Ph.D (Kansas St.)
Assistant Professors
M.O. Ngadi; B.Eng.(Agr.Eng.), M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Dal.Tech.)
N. Wang; B.Eng.(E.E.), M.Eng.(I.E.) (Asian Institute of Technology), M.Sc.(E.E.), Ph.D (Kansas St.)
Research Associates
P. Enright, V. Orsat, V. Sosle

12.2 Programs Offered

The Department offers M.Sc. and Ph.D. research programs in various areas of bioresource engineering including: plant and animal environments; ecological engineering (ecosystem modelling, design, management, and remediation); water resources management (hydrology, irrigation, drainage, water quality); agricultural machinery, mechatronics and robotics; food engineering and food processing; postharvest technology; waste management and protection of the environment; artificial intelligence.

The interdisciplinary nature of bioresource engineering often requires candidates for higher degrees to work in association with, or attend courses given by, a number of other departments at both the McGill University Macdonald Campus and the Downtown Campus.

12.3 Admission Requirements

Candidates for M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees should indicate in some detail their fields of special interest when applying for admission. An equivalent cumulative grade point average of 3.0/4.0 (second class-upper division) or 3.2/4.0 during the last two years of full-time university study is required at the Bachelor's level. High grades are expected in courses considered by the academic unit to be preparatory to the graduate program. Experience after the undergraduate degree is an additional asset.

12.4 Application Procedures

Applicants for graduate studies through academic units in the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences must forward supporting documents to:

Department of Bioresource Engineering
Macdonald Campus of McGill University
21,111 Lakeshore
Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC  H9X 3V9
Canada
Telephone: (514) 398-7773
Fax: (514) 398-8387
E-mail: robert.kok@mcgill.ca

Applications will be considered upon receipt of a completed application form, $60 application fee, and the following supporting documents:

Transcripts

- Two official copies of all university level transcripts with proof of degree(s) granted. Transcripts written in a language other than English or French must be accompanied by a certified translation. An explanation of the grading system used by the applicant's university is essential. It is the applicant's responsibility to arrange for transcripts to be sent.

It is desirable to submit a list of the titles of courses taken in the major subject, since transcripts often give code numbers only. Applicants must be graduates of a university of recognized reputation and hold a Bachelor's degree equivalent to a McGill Honours degree in a subject closely related to the one selected for graduate work. This implies that about one-third of all undergraduate courses should have been devoted to the subject itself and another third to cognate subjects.

Letters of Recommendation

- Two letters of recommendation on letterhead (official paper) of originating institution or bearing the university seal and with original signatures from two instructors familiar with the applicant's work, preferably in the applicant's area of specialization. It is the applicant's responsibility to arrange for these letters to be sent.

Competency in English

- Non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate degree using the English language are required to submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English, by appropriate exams, e.g., TOEFL (minimum score 550 on the paper-based test or 213 on the computer-based test) or IELTS (minimum overall band 6.5). The MCHE is not considered equivalent. Results must be submitted as part of the application. The University code is 0935 (McGill University, Montreal); please use department code 31 (graduate schools), Biological Sciences - Agriculture to ensure that your TOEFL reaches this Office without delay.

Graduate Record Exam (GRE)

- The GRE is not required, but it is highly recommended.

DOCUMENTS SUBMITTED WILL NOT BE RETURNED.

Application Fee (non-refundable)

- A fee of $60 Canadian must accompany each application (including McGill students), otherwise it cannot be considered. This sum must be remitted using one of the following methods:

1. Credit card (by completing the appropriate section of the application form). NB: on-line applications must be paid for by credit card.

2. Certified cheque in Cdn.$ drawn on a Canadian bank.

3. Certified cheque in U.S.$ drawn on a U.S. bank.

4. Canadian Money order in Cdn.$.

5. U.S. Money Order in U.S.$.

6. An international draft in Canadian funds drawn on a Canadian bank requested from the applicant's bank in his/her own country.

Deadlines

- Applications, including all supporting documents must reach the Department no later than June 1 (March 1 for International) for the Fall Term (September); October 15 (July 1 for International) for the Winter Term (January); February 15 (November 1 for International) for the Summer Term (May). It may be necessary to delay review of the applicant's file until the following admittance period if application materials including supporting documents are received after these dates. International applicants are advised to apply well in advance of the deadline because immigration procedures may be lengthy. Applicants are encouraged to make use of the on-line application form available on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/applying/ graduate.

Financial aid is very limited and highly competitive. It is suggested that students give serious consideration to their financial planning before submitting an application.

Acceptance to all programs depends on a staff member agreeing to serve as the student's supervisor and the student obtaining financial support. Normally, a student will not be accepted unless adequate financial support can be provided by the student and/or the student's supervisor. Academic units cannot guarantee financial support via teaching assistantships or other funds.

Qualifying Students

- Some applicants whose academic degrees and standing entitle them to serious consideration for admission to graduate studies, but who are considered inadequately prepared in the subject selected may be admitted to a Qualifying Program if they have met the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0. The course(s) to be taken in a Qualifying Program will be prescribed by the academic unit concerned. Qualifying students are registered in graduate studies, but not as candidates for a degree. Only one qualifying year is permitted. Successful completion of a qualifying program does not guarantee admission to a degree program.

12.5 Program Requirements

M.Sc. (Bioresource Engineering)

At least 12 months of full-time study are required for this degree. A student may complete the requirements by obtaining 46 credits under the requirements of the thesis or non-thesis options.

M.Sc. Thesis Option

This option for the M.Sc. degree is oriented towards individuals who intend to develop a career in bioresource engineering research. The requirements for this option are:

M.Sc. Thesis Option - Neotropical Environment

The requirements for this option are:

M.Sc. Applied - Non-thesis Option (Bioresource Engineering)

The non-thesis option is aimed towards individuals already employed in industry or seeking to improve their skills in specific areas (soil and water/structures and environment/waste management/and environment protection/post harvest technology/food process engineering/environmental engineering) in order to enter the engineering profession at a higher level. The requirements for a candidate registering for this option are:

Candidates must meet the qualifications of a professional engineer either before or during their M.Sc., Applied program.

Each candidate for this option is expected to establish and maintain contact with his/her academic advisor in the Department of Bioresource Engineering some time before registration in order to clarify objectives, investigate project possibilities and plan a program of study.

M.Sc. Applied - Non-thesis Option - Neotropical Environment

The program consists of a minimum of 45 credits. The requirements for a candidate registering for this option are:

M.Sc. Applied - Environmental Engineering Option

The program consists of a minimum of 45 credits, of which, depending on the student's home department, a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 15 may be allotted to the project. The balance is earned by coursework, of which one to three approved undergraduate (below 500-level) courses are allowed. Candidates must possess a Bachelor's degree in engineering with superior academic achievement (a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0).

To complete the program, students must:

Ph.D. - Bioresource Engineering

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree will normally register for the M.Sc. degree first. In cases where the research work is proceeding very satisfactorily, or where the equivalent of the M.Sc. degree has been completed previously, candidates may be permitted to proceed directly to the Ph.D. degree.

Requirements are:

Ph.D. - Neotropical Environment Option

The requirements for a candidate registering for this option are: 
    1. 6 credits of required courses: ENVR 610 and BIOL 640.
    2. 3 credits chosen from AGRI 550, BIOL 553, BIOL 641, ENVR 611, ENVR 612, ENVR 680, GEOG 498, POLI 644, SOCI 565.
    3. Participation in the MSE-Panama Symposium presentation in Montreal.
    4. Participation in graduate seminar during four terms.
    5. A comprehensive examination, ABEN 701, will be taken either late in the first, or early in the second, registration year to qualify to proceed to the completion of the Ph.D. degree.
    6. Satisfactory completion of a Ph.D. thesis.

12.6 Courses

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

H	Denotes courses taught only in alternate years. 
l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.

l

ABEN 501 Simulation and Modelling.

(3) (Restrictions: U3 students and above. Not open to students who have taken ABEN 612.)

l

ABEN 502 Drainage/Irrigation Engineering.

(3) (Prerequisite: ABEN 217) (Restrictions: U3 students and above. Not open to students who have taken ABEN 611.)

ABEN 504 Instrumentation and Control.

(3) (3 lectures and one 2-hour lab) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: ABEN 312 or ECSE 281) Principles and operation of instrument systems used for measurement and control in agricultural processes and research.

ABEN 506 Advances in Drainage Management.

(3) (3 weeks intensive course) Land drainage in relation to soils and crops. Design of regional drainage systems, stability of ditches, ice problems. Design of subsurface drainage systems. Theories of flow into drain tubes. Hydraulics of wells. Drainage of irrigated lands. Water table control.

ABEN 509 Hydrologic Systems and Modelling.

(3) (3 hour lectures) Use of deterministic and stochastic models to analyze components of the hydrologic cycle on agricultural and forested watersheds, floods frequency analysis, hydrograph analysis, infiltration, runoff, overland flow, flood routing, erosion and sediment transport. Effects of land-use changes and farm and recreational water management systems on the hydrologic regime.

l

H
ABEN 512 Soil Cutting and Tillage.

(3) (2 lectures and one 2-hour lab) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: ABEN 341).

l

ABEN 515 Soil Hydrologic Modelling.

(3) (3 lectures and one 3-hour lab).

l

H
ABEN 518 Bio-Treatment of Wastes.

(3) (One 3 hour lecture) Special topics concerning control of pollution agents from the agricultural industry; odour control, agricultural waste treatment including biological digestion, flocculants, land disposal and sedimentation, pesticide transport.

ABEN 519 Advanced Food Engineering.

(3) (3 lectures and one 2-hour lab) (Prerequisites: ABEN 325 and MECH 426, or permission of instructor) Advanced topics in food engineering. Concepts of mathematical modeling and research methodologies in food engineering. Topics include heat and mass transfer in food systems, packaging and distribution of food products, thermal and non-thermal processing, rheology and kinetics of food transformations.

l

H
ABEN 525 Climate Control for Buildings.

(3) (3 lectures and one 3-hour lab) (Prerequisite: ABEN 301) (Restriction: U3 students or above.)

H
ABEN 530 Fermentation Engineering.

(3) (3 lectures and one 3-hour lab) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: ABEN 325 or equivalent) (Graduate courses available to senior undergraduates with permission of the instructor) Advanced topics in food and fermentation engineering are covered, including brewing, bioreactor design and control and microbial kinetics.

l

ABEN 531 Post-Harvest Drying.

(3) (Restrictions: U3 students or above. Not open to students who have taken ABEN 621)

ABEN 532 Post-Harvest Storage.

(3) (Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 622) Active, semi-passive and passive storage systems; environmental control systems; post-harvest physiology and pathogenicity; quality assessment and control methodology; economic aspects of long-term storage.

ABEN 608 Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering.

(3) (2 conferences, either term) Laboratory, field and library studies and reports on special problems related to agricultural and biosystems engineering that are not covered in regular course work.

l

ABEN 616 Advanced Soil and Water Engineering.

(3) (3 lectures)

ABEN 623 Proposal Preparation.

(3) (3 hours conferences) Critiques of proposals prepared by others. Preparation and defense of draft proposals for funding agencies.

ABEN 625 Water Quality Management.

(3) Management of water quality for sustainablilty. Cause of soil degradation, surface and groundwater contamination by agricultural chemicals and toxic pollutants. Screening and mechanistic models. Human health and safety concerns. Water table management. Soil and water conservation techniques will be examined with an emphasis on methods of prediction and best management practices.

ABEN 651 Departmental Seminar M.Sc. 1.

(1) To give seminars and participate in discussions.

ABEN 652 Departmental Seminar M.Sc. 2.

(1) To give seminars and participate in discussions.

ABEN 671 Project 1.

(6) Prepare project outline, execute and report. This project relates to the M.Sc. (Applied) degree.

ABEN 671D1 (3), ABEN 671D2 (3) Project 1.

(Students must register for both ABEN 671D1 and ABEN 671D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ABEN 671D1 and ABEN 671D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ABEN 671D1 and ABEN 671D2 together are equivalent to ABEN 671) Prepare project outline, execute and report. This project relates to the M.Sc. (Applied) degree.

ABEN 672 Project 2.

(6) Prepare project outline, execute and report. This project relates to the M.Sc. (Applied) degree.

ABEN 672D1 (3), ABEN 672D2 (3) Project 2.

(Students must register for both ABEN 672D1 and ABEN 672D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ABEN 672D1 and ABEN 672D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ABEN 672D1 and ABEN 672D2 together are equivalent to ABEN 672) Prepare project outline, execute and report. This project relates to the M.Sc. (Applied) degree.

ABEN 691 M.Sc. Thesis 1.

(4) Problem definition and literature Review.

ABEN 692 M.Sc. Thesis 2.

(4)

ABEN 693 M.Sc. Thesis 3.

(4) Methodology development.

ABEN 694 M.Sc. Thesis 4.

(4) Experimentation 1.

ABEN 695 M.Sc. Thesis 5.

(4) Experimentation 2.

ABEN 696 M.Sc. Thesis 6.

(4) Data analysis.

ABEN 697 M.Sc. Thesis 7.

(4) Draft thesis preparation.

ABEN 698 M.Sc. Thesis 8.

(4) Thesis completion and acceptance.

ABEN 699 Scientific Publication.

(3) (Periodic conferences) Review and critique papers that are published in field of the candidate. Prepare draft paper(s) following the format of leading journals in field of study undertaken.

ABEN 701 Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination.

(0)

l

ABEN 701D1 (0), ABEN 701D2 (0) Ph.D. Comprehensive Examination.

(Students must register for both ABEN 701D1 and ABEN 701D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both ABEN 701D1 and ABEN 701D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (ABEN 701D1 and ABEN 701D2 together are equivalent to ABEN 701)

ABEN 702 Special Problems in Agricultural Engineering 2.

(3) (2 conferences, either term) Advanced level laboratory, field and library studies and reports on special problems related to agricultural and biosystems engineering which are not covered in regular course work. Designed for doctoral level students with experience in postgraduate studies.

ABEN 751 Departmental Seminar Ph.D. 1.

(0) To give seminars and participate in discussions.

ABEN 752 Departmental Seminar Ph.D. 2.

(0) To give seminars and participate in discussions.

ABEN 753 Departmental Seminar Ph.D. 3.

(0) To give seminars and participate in discussion.

ABEN 754 Departmental Seminar Ph.D. 4.

(0) To give seminars and participate in discussions.

13 Chemical Engineering

Department of Chemical Engineering
M.H. Wong Building
3610 University Street
Montreal, QC  H3A 2B2
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-4494
Fax: (514) 398-6678
E-mail: info.chemeng@mcgill.ca 
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/chemeng 
Chair
R.J. Munz

13.1 Staff

Emeritus Professor
M.E. Weber; B.S.E.(Prin.), Sc.D.(M.I.T.), P.Eng.
Professors
D.G. Cooper; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
J.M. Dealy; B.S.(Kansas), M.S.E., Ph.D.(Mich.), Eng.
M.R. Kamal; B.S.(Ill.), M.S., Ph.D.(Carn.-Mellon), Eng.
R.J. Munz; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc.(Wat.), Ph.D.(McG.), Eng.
A.D. Rey; B.Ch.E.(C.C.N.Y.), Ph.D.(Calif.) (James McGill Professor)
J.H. Vera; B.Mat.(Chile), Ing.Quim.(U.T.E.), M.S.(Calif.), Dr.Ing.(Santa Maria), Eng.
B. Volesky; M.Sc.(Czech. Tech. Univ.), Ph.D.(W.Ont.)
Associate Professors
D. Berk; B.Sc.(Bosphorus), M.E.Sc.(W.Ont.), Ph.D.(Calg.), P.Eng.
J.-L. Meunier; D.Ing.(E.P.F.L.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(I.N.R.S.), Eng.
Assistant Professors
S. Coulombe; B.Sc., M.Sc.A.(Sherb.), Ph.D.(McG.)
R.J. Hill; B.E.(Auck.), Ph.D.(C'nell)
R.L. Leask; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc.(Wat.), Ph.D.(Tor.), P.Eng.
C.A. Leclerc; B. S.(Maine), Ph.D.(Minn.)
M. Maric; B.Eng.& Mgnt. (McM.), Ph.D.(Minn.), P.Eng.
S. Omanovic; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Zagreb)
P.D. Servio; B.A.Sc., Ph.D.(UBC)
Post-Retirement
J.-M. Charrier; Dipl.Ing., (E.N.S.A.M. Paris), M.S., Ph.D.(Akron), Eng.
W.J.M. Douglas; B.Sc.(Qu.), M.S.E., Ph.D.(Mich.)
Paprican Adjunct Professor
G.J. Kubes; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Prague), Ph.D.(Bratislava), P.Eng.
Adjunct Professors
A. Beils, C. Bélanger, P. Bisaillon, W.A. Brown, R.H. Crotogino, P. Csakany, M. Davidovsky, D. Dionne, S. Guiot, D. Juck, D.J. McKeagan, C. Miguez, P. Nadeau, M. Perrier, N.P. Peters, M. Renaud, B. Sarkis, R.C. Urquhart, L.A. Utracki,
P. Wood-Adams.

13.2 Programs Offered

The Department offers programs leading to the Master of Engineering, the Master of Science, and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees.

Two options are available for the M.Eng. degree: the thesis option and the project option. The M.Eng. (Thesis) is a research-oriented degree requiring a limited number of courses and a research thesis; the M.Eng. (Project) is a course-oriented degree which includes a project. Two specialized versions of the M.Eng. (Project) are offered: specialization in petrochemicals, polymers and plastics; specialization in environmental engineering.

The M.Sc. degree is appropriate for science graduates wishing to complete a Master's thesis without acquiring a broad engineering background. The requirements for the M.Sc. are similar to those for the M.Eng. (Thesis).

The Ph.D. is a research degree requiring a thesis which makes a distinct contribution to knowledge.

The Department's offices and research laboratories are located in the M.H. Wong Building, which was completed in 1996. Members of the Department are active in a number of research areas, including transport phenomena, separation processes, thermodynamics, chemical reaction engineering and catalysis, experimental and computational materials science, electrochemistry, plasma technology, polymer science and engineering, biochemical engineering, biotechnology, biomedical engineering, biomechanics, nanotechnology, sustainable energy development, gas hydrate systems, and environmental engineering. Most staff are members of one or more research groups.

Biotechnology research in the department includes the development of new processes/products, the environmental impact of biotransformation and biomedical applications. Strong collaborations in these research areas exist with other engineering departments, the Faculty of Medicine and the Montreal Heart Institute. Research in biomedical engineering also includes development and characterization of biomaterials for human implants and biosensors.

Research in Plasma Technology includes fundamental studies in transport phenomena, reaction kinetics, optical emission and laser-absorption spectroscopy, and reactor design, as well as applied studies in plasma processing for environmental and biomedical engineering applications, advanced materials synthesis, and coating generation. Close collaboration is maintained with the Université de Sherbrooke through the Interuniversity Plasma Technology Research Centre (CRTP) and with other Québec universities through Plasma-Québec, a Regroupement Stratégique FQRNT.

Research related to the Environment is pursued on many fronts; for example, the plasma group is investigating plasma-assisted incineration, the biochemical group is evaluating biosorbents for heavy metals, the biodegradation of pesticides, and a number of projects considering the fate of plasticizers, chlorinated hydrocarbons and polymers in the environment. Other projects involve electrochemical treatment of wastewater, activated sludge treatment, development of envrionmentally-friendly corrosion inhibitors, etc.

Research in Computational Materials Science is a science-based program that seeks to design and control materials, products, and processes using molecular, mesoscopic, and macroscopic computational modeling. This work is in close collaboration with the National Science Foundation Center for Advanced Engineering Fibers and Films at Clemson University. The research in Computational Biomaterials Science seeks to understand the fundamental natural principles that lead to advanced materials such as superstrong spider silk fibers, natural foams, and biolubricants.

Research in colloids and interface science brings together a variety of theoretical, computational and experimental 'tools'. Current efforts are focused on the development of a novel optical-tweezer/micro-electrophoresis apparatus for probing the dynamics of "fuzzy" colloidal particles, and development of experiments and theory for studying the organization and dynamics of synthetic polymers grafted to lipid-bilayer membranes. The broader objectives are to understand in detail how macromolecules forming "soft" interfaces influence colloidal dynamics and equilibria.

13.3 Admissions Requirements

Admission to graduate study requires a minimum CGPA of 3.0/4.0 (or equivalent) for the complete Bachelor's program or a minimum GPA of 3.2/4.0 (or equivalent) in the last two years of full-time studies. Non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue is not English must achieve a minimum TOEFL score of 577 on the paper-based test (233 on the computer-based test) prior to admission.

M.Eng. (Thesis), M.Eng. (Project)

Admission requires a Bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in chemical engineering or other engineering disciplines. Students with Bachelor's degrees in science wishing to pursue the M.Eng. first enter a Qualifying Program, normally of two terms, to prepare for entry into the M.Eng. program.

M.Sc.

Admission requires a Bachelor's degree (or equivalent) in science. In some cases, depending on the area of research, the student may be required to complete one or two extra courses as part of the graduate program.

Ph.D.

Program revisions are under consideration for September 2004

Admission requires a Master's degree (or equivalent) from a recognized university. Students in the Department's M.Eng. (Thesis) or M.Sc. program may transfer to the Ph.D. program after one year without submitting the Master's thesis following a formal "fast track" procedure.

13.4 Application Procedures

The application procedure is outlined on the Web at www.mcgill. ca/chemeng/grad/application. The first step in the process is to complete a pre-application form. The completed preliminary application form is evaluated by the Admissions Committee. A formal application is only requested of the candidate if there is a reasonable probability of admission.

Full applications will be considered when the Graduate Admissions Committee has received:

Application deadlines differ for International and Canadian (and Permanent Resident) students, to allow time to obtain a visa.

Deadlines for Canadian (and Permanent Resident) applicants:
May 15 for September (Fall term) admission,
October 1 for January (Winter term) admission,
February 1 for May (Summer term) admission. 
Deadlines for International applicants:
February 15 for September (Fall term) admission, 
August 1 for January (Winter term) admission,
December 1 for May (Summer term) admission. 

13.5 Program Requirements

M.Eng., M.Sc.

The Master's degrees require the completion of 45 credits and three terms of residence at McGill.

M.Eng. (Thesis), M.Sc.

Courses: 12 credits of graduate courses (500- or 600-level) 
(a minimum of 3 courses in Chemical Engineering, one of 
which is from the Chemical Engineering Fundamentals). 
Research: 33 credits which include completion of a thesis pro-
posal, presentation of a research seminar and submission of a 
thesis. 

M.Eng. (Project)

Courses: 33-39 credits (a minimum of 18 credits in chemical 
engineering). 
Project: (design or research): 6-12 credits. 

The specialized versions of the M.Eng. (Project) follow the above distribution between courses and project.

The specialization in petrochemicals, polymers and plastics, which is offered in cooperation with the Institute Français du Pétrole (IFP), requires that the Winter term be spent at IFP in Paris where 15 course credits are completed. This program may be entered in September, January or May.

The specialization in environmental engineering requires the completion of a Core of 12 credits of environmental engineering courses and a research or design project related to the environment.

Ph.D.

The Ph.D. requires three years of residence at McGill.

Courses: A minimum of two 600-level Chemical Engineering 
courses; however, students must take at least three courses 
(or their equivalent) from the Chemical Engineering Funda-
mentals during their Master's and Ph.D. programs combined. 
Research: completion of a thesis proposal, its defence, presenta-
tion of two seminars, and submission and defence of a thesis. 

Chemical Engineering Fundamentals (Courses):

CHEE 611
Heat and Mass Transfer
CHEE 621
Thermodynamics
CHEE 631
Foundations of Fluid Mechanics
CHEE 641
Chemical Reaction Engineering
CHEE 662
Computational Methods

13.6 Courses

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.
CHEE 571 Small Computer Applications: Chemical Engineering.

(3) (3-0-6) (Prerequisite: CHEE 458 or permission of the instructor.) The use of small computers employing a high level language for data acquisition and the control of chemical processes. Real-time system characteristics and requirements, analog to digital, digital to analog conversions and computer control loops are examined. Block level simulation.

l

CHEE 581 Polymer Composites Engineering.

(3) (3-0-6) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: CHEE 481 or permission of instructor)

CHEE 591 Environmental Bioremediation.

(3) (3-0-6) The presence and role of microorganisms in the environment, the role of microbes in environmental remediation either through natural or human-mediated processes, the application of microbes in pollution control and the monitoring of environmental pollutants.

CHEE 611 Heat and Mass Transfer.

(4) Heat and mass transfer in laminar and turbulent flows; scaling; models for interphase transport.

CHEE 621 Thermodynamics.

(4) Theory and application of phase and chemical equilibria in multicomponent systems.

CHEE 631 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics.

(4) Rigorous derivation of equations of motion; creeping flow inviscid flow; boundary layer theory; hydrodynamic stability; turbulent flow, separated flows, drag on submerged bodies.

CHEE 641 Chemical Reaction Engineering.

(4) Interpretation of chemical reaction data, especially for heterogeneous systems. Residence time, complete segregation, maximum mixedness, other advanced concepts. Reactor design.

CHEE 643 Thermal Plasma Technology.

(3) (Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor) An introduction to thermal (high temperature) plasmas as applied to chemical and materials engineering. Degree of ionization, velocity distribution function, plasma parameters, collisions and diffusion, energy states, plasma generation, diagnostic techniques for plasma and particles, particle-plasma interaction, mathematical modelling of plasma systems, applications.

CHEE 662 Computational Methods.

(4) Methods of weighted residuals; solution to non-linear algebraic equations; stability in nonlinear equations; bifurcations; mesh refinement strategies; convection dominated transport; hyperbolic equations, particle simulation methods.

CHEE 672 Process Dynamics and Control.

(4) (Prerequisite: CHEE 455) Process representation and identification and simulation; sensor stability; sensitivity of feedback control systems; feedward control; discrete representation of continuous systems; controller tuning; adaptive control.

l

CHEE 673 Biosystems Engineering.

(3) (Intensive course.)

l

CHEE 681 Polymer Chemical Engineering.

(3)

CHEE 682 Engineering Properties of Polymeric Materials.

(3) Mechanical and transport properties of non-crystallizing and crystallizing thermoplastics, rigid thermosets, fibers, films, elastomers and composites with particle and fiber reinforcement. Elasticity, visco-elasticity, ultimate properties, diffusion of liquids and gases, thermal and electrical properties.

l

CHEE 683 Polymer Rheology.

(3)

CHEE 684 Polymer Processing.

(3) Survey of engineering properties of polymers and processing operations, degradation of polymers, extrusion, injection molding, fiber spinning, film blowing, blow molding, thermoforming, miscellaneous other processes. Lectures, plant visits, problem assignments.

CHEE 685 Polymer Product and Process Design Project.

(3) Principles of product design, optimization and processing conditions for the production of plastics articles. Selection of resins, process and equipment and tool design, considering cost, safety and environmental aspects of production. Students undertake projects to define specifications for the manufacture of selected plastics articles.

CHEE 686 Polymer Engineering Laboratory.

(3) Study of experimental aspects of polymer characterization. Areas of study are selected from molecular weighlt determination, polymer morphology, mechanical and rheological behaviour. Polymer processing areas available for study include extrusion, mixing and injection and compression molding.

CHEE 690 Research Techniques.

(3) This course introduces techniques and develops skills necessary for commencing a particular thesis research project. A written report is required.

l

CHEE 692 Selected Topics in Chemical Engineering.

(2)

l

CHEE 693 Selected Topics in Chemical Engineering.

(3)

l

CHEE 694 Selected Topics in Chemical Engineering.

(4)

CHEE 695 Project in Chemical Engineering.

(6) Independent work under the general direction of a full-time staff member, on a problem of industrially-oriented design or research leading to a comprehensive report.

CHEE 696 Extended Project.

(6) Extended independent work on a problem of industrially-oriented design or research, leading to a comprehensive project report.

CHEE 697 Thesis Proposal.

(6) Independent work under the supervision of the thesis advisor(s) leading to a thesis proposal.

CHEE 698 Thesis Research 1.

(12) (Prerequisite: CHEE 697) Ongoing research pertaining to thesis.

l

CHEE 698N1 Thesis Research 1.

(6) (Students must also register for CHEE 698N2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both CHEE 698N1 and CHEE 698N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (CHEE 698N1 and CHEE 698N2 together are equivalent to CHEE 698)

l

CHEE 698N2 Thesis Research 1.

(6) (Prerequisite: CHEE 698N1) (No credit will be given for this course unless both CHEE 698N1 and CHEE 698N2 are successfully completed in a twelve month period) (CHEE 698N1 and CHEE 698N2 together are equivalent to CHEE 698)

CHEE 699 Thesis Research 2.

(15) (Prerequisite: CHEE 698) Ongoing research pertaining to thesis.

CHEE 795 Ph.D. Thesis Proposal.

(0) Independent work under the supervision of the thesis advisor(s) leading to a thesis proposal.

CHEE 796 Ph.D. Proposal Defence.

(0) Presentation and defence of thesis proposal at an oral examination.

CHEE 797 Ph.D. Seminar.

(0) (Prerequisite: CHEE 796) Required for all Ph.D. candidates. Presentation of a seminar on an aspect of their thesis work.

14 Chemistry

Department of Chemistry
Otto Maass Chemistry Building
801 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2K6
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-6999
Fax: (514) 398-3797
E-mail: graduate.chemistry@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/chemistry 
Chair
R.B. Lennox
Director of Graduate Studies
B.A. Arndtsen

14.1 Staff

Emeritus Professors
B.C. Eu; B.Sc.(Seoul), Ph.D.(Brown)
J.F. Harrod; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Birm.)
A.S. Hay; B.Sc.(Alta.), Ph.D.(Ill.), F.R.S.
M. Onyszchuk; B.Sc.(McG.), M.Sc.(W.Ont.), Ph.D.(Cantab), Ph.D.(McG.), F.C.I.C.
D. Patterson; M.Sc.(McG.)
A.S. Perlin; M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.), F.C.I.C., F.R.S.C.
W.C. Purdy; B.A.(Amh.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.), F.C.I.C.
L.E. St-Pierre; B.Sc.(Alta.), Ph.D.(Notre Dame), F.C.I.C.
M.A. Whitehead; B.Sc., Ph.D., D.Sc.(Lond.), F.C.I.C.
Professors
D.S. Bohle; B.A.(Reed College), M.Phil., Ph.D.(Auck.)
I.S. Butler; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Brist.), F.C.I.C.
T.H. Chan; B.Sc.(Tor.), M.A., Ph.D.(Prin.), F.C.I.C., F.R.S.C.
M. Damha; B.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
A. Eisenberg; B.S.(Wor. Poly.), M.A., Ph.D.(Prin.), F.C.I.C.
P.G. Farrell; B.Sc., Ph.D., D.Sc.(Ex.)
D.F.R. Gilson; B.Sc.(Lond.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Br.Col.), F.C.I.C.
D.N. Harpp; A.B.(Middlebury), M.A.(Wesleyan), Ph.D. (N.Carolina), F.C.I.C.
G.E. Just; Ing.Chem.(E.T.H. Zürich), Ph.D.(W.Ont.), F.C.I.C.
R.B. Lennox; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
C.J. Li; B.Sc.(Zhengzhou), M.S.(Chinese Academy of Sciences), Ph.D.(McG.)
R.H. Marchessault; B.Sc.(Montr.), Ph.D.(McG.), F.C.I.C., F.R.S.C.
D.M. Ronis; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
E.D. Salin; B.Sc.(Calif.), Ph.D.(Oregon), F.C.I.C.
B.C. Sanctuary; B.Sc., Ph.D.(Br.Col.)
A.G. Shaver; B.Sc.(Carl.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.)
Associate Professors
M.P. Andrews; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.)
B.A. Arndtsen; B.A.(Carl.), Ph.D.(Stan.)
D.H. Burns; B.Sc.(Puget Sound), Ph.D.(Wash.)
W.C. Galley; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Calif.)
J.L. Gleason; B.Sc.(McG.), Ph.D.(Va.)
A. Kakkar; B.Sc., M.Sc.(Chan. U., India), Ph.D.(Wat.)
J.F. Power; B.Sc., Ph.D.(C'dia)
L. Reven; B.A.(Carl.), Ph.D.(Ill.)
Assistant Professors
P. Ariya; B.Sc., Ph.D.(York)
K. Auclair; B.Sc.(U.Q.A.C.), Ph.D.(Alta)
C.J. Barrett; B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Qu.)
P. Kambhampati; B.A. (Carleton College), Ph.D. (Texas)
N. Moitessier; B.A., Ph.D.(Nancy)
H. Sleiman; B.Sc.(A.U.B.), Ph.D.(Stan.)
P. Wiseman; B.Sc.(St.F.X.), Ph.D.(W.Ont.)
Lecturers
J. Finkenbine, G. Wilczek
Associate Members
J.A. Finch (Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering), O.A. Mamer (University Clinic, RVH), B.I. Posner (Medicine), K. Gehring (Biochemistry)
Paprican Adjunct Professors
D.G. Gray, R. St. John Manley, T.G.M. Van de Ven
Adjunct Professors
D. Argyropoulos, Y. Guindon, R.J. Kazlauskas, Y. Tsantrizos, I. Wharf, R. Zamboni

14.2 Programs Offered

M.Sc., Ph.D. and the M.Sc. (Applied).
The Department also offers the Chemical Biology Interdisciplinary Graduate Option, together with the Departments of Biochemistry, and Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Students interested in training in this option must first be accepted for graduate studies by one of the participating departments. Information on this option can be found at the following web address: www.mcgill.ca/biochemistry/chemicalbiology.

Research in Chemistry

Members of the Department are active in directing research in the following fields:

Analytical

- Atomic and molecular spectroscopy; laboratory automation; artificial intelligence; instrument design; optimization of data processing techniques; application of modern analytical techniques to biochemical and medical systems; detectors for liquid chromatography; photothermal analytical methods; thermal wave imaging; development of analytical techniques for studies of diffusion and photodegradation in thin films. Technique development for quantitative spectroscopy in scattering media. Micronano-sensors; Chemoinfomatics. Analytical spectroscopy of bioenergetics.

Bio-organic

- Enzyme chemistry; protein and nucleic acid structure and function; drug design and modification; active site stereochemistry; molecular basis of regulation and pharmacological action; lipid and lipid analogue chemistry.

Biophysical

- Excited electronic states of proteins and nucleic acids; spectroscopic probes of biopolymer conformation; sensitized photochemistry in biopolymers; dynamics of protein and nucleic acid conformations. Spectroscopic analysis of oxygen transport in aerobic metabolism.

Colloid and Polymer

- Monomolecular layers; solution properties of high polymers; molecular morphology; rheology and stability of dispersions; phase transitions in polymers and polymer blends; polymer reinforcement; radiation effects and solid-state polymerization; mechanisms of polymerization reactions; wetting and spreading; the glass transition; molecular dynamics and polymer properties; ionic polymers; cellulose and paper; carbohydrate biopolymers; pollution abatement; polymer melt rheology; synthetic latex; rheo- and electro-optical phenomena; polymers at interfaces.

Inorganic

- Synthesis of new classes of organometallic complexes and inorganic polymers; homogeneous catalysis; catenated polysulfur and polysulfoxide complexes; organosilicon chemistry; spectroscopic studies (e.g., FT-IR, laser Raman, multinuclear NMR, and mass) of complexes; kinetics and mechanisms of inorganic and organometallic reactions; bioinorganic chemistry; inorganic materials chemistry; asymmetric catalysis; surface chemistry.

Organic

- Synthesis and structure of heterocyclic compounds; natural products; carbohydrates; cellulose; plant-growth regulators; organic sulphur, chemistry; stereochemistry; reaction mechanisms; charge transfer complexes; new synthetic methods; conformational analysis; solvation effects; substituent effects; polymer supports; nucleic acids, anti-sense and anti-gene oligonucleotides.

Physical

- Laser excited luminescence and novel optical materials. Order-disorder phenomena in molecular crystals and liquid crystals. Vibrational spectroscopy at high pressures. Nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy.

Pulp and Paper

- Research in areas of chemistry of interest to the Canadian pulp and paper industry is also performed at the Pulp and Paper Research Centre, adjacent to the Chemistry Department. Current research topics include cellulose and lignin chemistry, the chemistry of pulping and bleaching, colloidal aspects of papermaking, physical chemistry of cellulosic materials, and de-inking and recycling of paper.

Theoretical

- Non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, kinetic theory of fluids and plasmas, non-equilibrium thermodynamics of non-linear transport processes for systems far from equilibrium and fluid dynamics. Theories of nuclear magnetic resonance and multiquantum NMR spectra are developed with emphasis on the determination of the structures of proteins from NMR. Molecular structure, chemical bonding, intermolecular forces in solids and isolated molecules in dimers and metastable polymers are studied quantum mechanically.

14.3 Admission Requirements

The minimum academic standard for admission to research thesis M.Sc., Ph.D. and the M.Sc. (Applied) degree programs is a minimum standing equivalent to a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0 or a CGPA of 3.2/4.0 for the last two full-time academic years. Applicants from other institutions should have an academic background equivalent to that of a McGill graduate in the Chemistry Honours/Major programs. If possible, candidates should specify the field of research in which they are interested.

Admissions Requirements - Chemical Biology Option

As for the regular graduate programs of the participating departments, acceptance into the Chemical Biology Option consists of two steps:

1.	Preliminary approval by the Department's Graduate Commit-
tee based on the student's transcript, references and other 
documents submitted with the application. The criteria for 
assessment at this level are the same as for the regular grad-
uate programs of the participating departments.  
2.	Acceptance by an individual research director. For students 
wishing to participate in the Chemical Biology Option, the 
director must propose a research project for the student that 
provides training in the methods and philosophy of chemical 
biology. Project proposals are assessed by the Chemical 
Biology Program Committee.  

14.4 Application Procedures

All inquiries concerning graduate work in the Department should be addressed to the Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemistry.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

M.Sc. and Ph.D. Degrees

Financial assistance for accepted graduate students who do not hold fellowships or scholarships is normally available in the form of laboratory demonstratorships/assistantships, and occasionally by payment from research funds. Graduate students devote 12 hours per week (contact hours, plus grading of reports, etc.) during the academic session to their teaching duties. Financial assistance during the remainder of the year is provided from research funds. Most students receive partial fee waivers. Scholarship holders, such as NSERC or awards of similar value, receive a tuition fee waiver.

M.Sc. (Applied) Degree

Financial assistance for candidates in the M.Sc. (Applied) program is not available during the two academic sessions when courses are taken, unless candidates are recipients of scholarships. During the four-month project, candidates are paid at rates established by participating companies.

14.5 Program Requirements

M.Sc.* and Ph.D. Degrees

* This program requires 45-50 credits.

A minimum of 6 credits of course work is required; the balance of credits will be made up from either a combination of course work (graduate and upper undergraduate) and thesis credits, or from thesis research credits only. There will be a minimum of 24 credits in the thesis research component.

M.Sc. (Applied) Degree

This program requires a minimum of 45 credits, 30 credits of course work (graduate and upper undergraduate) plus a 15-credit project in some aspect of chemical industry, normally completed during a four-month project.

Examinations in Chemistry

Program Requirements - Chemical Biology Option

The curriculum of the Chemical Biology Option is structured so that in completing the option, students also complete the course requirements for the regular graduate programs in their home departments. For this reason, program requirements are listed separately for each department, even though the 'core' content in Chemical Biology (9 lecture credits plus 2 or 4 seminar credits for each program) is the same for each. The course requirements for the Chemical Biology Option taken through the Chemistry Department are available at www.mcgill.ca/biochemistry/chemicalbiology.

14.6 Courses for Higher Degrees

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

Term(s) offered (Fall, Winter, Summer) may appear after the credit weight to indicate when a course would normally be taught. Please check Class Schedule to confirm this information.

Note:

All undergraduate courses administered by the Faculty of Science (courses at the 100- to 500-level) have limited enrolment.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

Advanced Undergraduate Courses

Undergraduate courses may be required of a student who is admitted to a graduate program if deficiencies are perceived in the student's previous training. Descriptions of undergraduate courses may be found in the Faculty of Science section of the Undergradute Programs Calendar.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.
CHEM 502 Advanced Bio-Organic Chemistry.

(3) (Prerequisite: CHEM 302) (Not open to students who have taken CHEM 402.) This course will cover biologically relevant molecules, particularly nucleic acids, proteins, and their building blocks. In each case, synthesis and biological functions will be discussed. The topics include synthesis of oligonucleotides and peptides; chemistry of phosphates; enzyme structure and function; coenzymes, and enzyme catalysis; polyketides; antiviral and anticancer agents.

CHEM 503 Drug Design and Development 1.

(3) (Fall) (Prerequisites: CHEM 302, BIOL 200, BIOL 201 or BIOC 212, PHAR 300 or PHAR 301 or PHAR 303 or permission of instructor) (U3 and graduate students. Students can register only with permission of coordinators. Priority: students registered in the Minor in Pharmacology) (Not open to students who are taking or have taken PHAR 503) Interdisciplinary course in drug design and development covering chemistry, mechanisms of action and steps in drug development, principles and problems in drug design.

CHEM 504 Drug Design and Development 2.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisite: CHEM 503 and permission of instructor) (U3 and graduate students. Students can register only with permission of coordinators) (Not open to students who are taking or have taken PHAR 504) Groups of 2-4 students with different backgrounds will form a team. Each team will select a lead compound, design the analogues, propose the preclinical and clinical studies, present possible untoward effects, and reasons for drug (dis)approval.

CHEM 531 Chemistry of Inorganic Materials.

(3) (Winter) (3 lectures) (Prerequisite: CHEM 381) Structure, bonding, synthesis, properties and applications of covalent, ionic, metallic crystals, and amorphous solids. Defect structures and their use in synthesis of specialty materials such as electronic conductors, semiconductors, and superconductors, and solid electrolytes. Basic principles of composite materials and applications of chemistry to materials processing.

CHEM 534 Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

(3) (Fall) (Prerequisites: CHEM 334 or PHYS 334 or permission of instructor. Corequisites: one of CHEM 345, PHYS 357, or PHYS 446 or permission of instructor) (Not open to students who have taken or are taking PHYS 534) Topics discussed include scanning probe microscopy, chemical self-assembly, computer modelling, and microfabrication/micromachining.

CHEM 543 Chemistry of Pulp and Paper.

(3) (Fall) (2 lectures plus a reading/research project.) (Prerequisite: CHEM 302 or permission of instructor.) The industrial processes for converting wood to paper are described with emphasis on the relevant organic, physical, surface chemistry and colloid chemistry. The structure and organization of the polymeric constituents of wood are related to the mechanical, optical and other requisite properties of paper.

CHEM 547 Laboratory Automation.

(3) (Winter) (Two 1.5 hour lectures, lab) (Prerequisite: CHEM 377, equivalent or permission of instructor) Automation and data handling with respect to modern chemical laboratory instrumentation. Basic electronics, data acquisition, evaluation of laboratory needs, data processing methodologies.

CHEM 552 Physical Organic Chemistry.

(3) (Fall) (Prerequisite: CHEM 302) The correlation of theory with physical measurements on organic systems; an introduction to photochemistry; solvent and substituent effects on organic reaction rates, etc.; reaction mechanisms.

CHEM 555 NMR Spectroscopy.

(3) (Fall) (3 lectures) (Prerequisite: CHEM 355 or equivalent) Interpretation of proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in one dimension for structural identification.

CHEM 556 Advanced Quantum Mechanics.

(3) (Fall) (3 lectures) (Prerequisites: CHEM 345 and PHYS 242) Quantum mechanical treatment of species of chemical interest. Introduction to perturbation theory, both time-dependent and time-independent. Treatment of the variational principle. Introduction to atomic spectra. Chemical bonding in terms of both the valence bond and molecular orbital theory. Elementary collision theory. Interaction of radiation with molecules.

CHEM 567 Chemometrics: Data Analysis.

(3) (Winter) (2 lectures amd 3 hours of laboratory) (Prerequisite: Linear Algebra and experience in some computer programming language) Topics covered include; factorial analysis of chemical spectra, pattern recognition from multisensor data, linear and nonlinear optimization for the determination of optimal reaction conditions molecular modeling, multisensor calibration, etc.

CHEM 571 Polymer Synthesis.

(3) (Winter) (3 lectures) (Prerequisite: CHEM 302 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.) A survey of polymer preparation and characterization; mechanisms of chain growth, including free radical, cationic, anionic, condensation and transition metal-mediated polymerization, and the effects of these mechanisms on polymer architecture; preparation of alternating, block, graft and stereoblock copolymers; novel macromolecular structures including dendrimers and other nanostructures.

CHEM 572 Synthetic Organic Chemistry.

(3) (3 lectures) (Prerequisite: CHEM 382) Synthetic methods in organic chemistry and their application to the synthesis of complex molecules.

CHEM 575 Chemical Kinetics.

(3) (Winter) (3 lectures) (Prerequisites: CHEM 273 and CHEM 213) Kinetic laws, measurement of reaction rates, transition state and collision theory. Elementary reactions in gas, solution and solid phases and on surfaces. Reaction mechanisms, laser techniques, molecular beams, chemiluminescence, explosions. Extensive use of computers to simulate the kinetic behaviour of chemical systems.

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CHEM 576 Quantum Chemistry.

(3) (Lecture and/or reading course) (Prerequisite: CHEM 345)

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CHEM 577 Electroanalytical Chemistry.

(3) (Prerequisites: CHEM 367 and CHEM 377)

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CHEM 581 Inorganic Topics 1.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisite: CHEM 381)

CHEM 582 Supramolecular Chemistry.

(3) (Prerequisites: CHEM 222, CHEM 381) Introduction to supramolecular organization will be followed by discussions on the nature of interactions and methodologies to create ordered aggregates of high complexity. Potential of supramolecular chemistry in fabricating smart materials will be explored using specific topics including inclusion chemistry, dendrimers, molecular self-assembly and crystal engineering.

CHEM 585 Colloid Chemistry.

(3) (Winter) (Prerequisites: CHEM 273 and CHEM 345, MATH 223 and MATH 315, PHYS 241 and PHYS 242 or permission of instructor) Principles of the physical chemistry of phase boundaries. Electrical double layer theory; van der Waals forces; Brownian motion; kinetics of coagulation; electrokinetics; light scattering; solid/liquid interactions; adsorption; surfactants; hydrodynamic interactions; rheology of dispersions.

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CHEM 587 Topics in Modern Analytical Chemistry.

(3) (Fall) (Prerequisites: CHEM 367 and CHEM 377)

CHEM 591 Bioinorganic Chemistry.

(3) (Winter) (3 hours) (Prerequisite: CHEM 381) (For Honours and Major Chemistry students or with permission) The roles of transition and main group elements in biology and medicine will be examined with an emphasis on using tools for structure and genome searching as well as becoming acquainted with experimental spectroscopic methods useful for bioinorganic chemistry such as macromolecular X-ray diffraction, EPR and EXAFS.

CHEM 593 Statistical Mechanics.

(3) (Winter) (2 lectures) (Research project) (Prerequisite: CHEM 345. Recommended: CHEM 365) Basic hypotheses of statistical thermodynamics; ideal monatomic, diatomic and polyatomic gases; Einstein and Debye models of solids; statistical theory of black-body radiation; Debye-Hückel theory of electrolyte solutions; absolute reaction rate theory of rate processes; theories of solutions.

CHEM 597 Analytical Spectroscopy.

(3) (Fall) (2 lectures; 3 hours lab) (Prerequisites: CHEM 367 and CHEM 377) The design and analytical use of spectroscopic instrumentation with respect to fundamental and practical limitations. Classical emission, fluorescence, absorption and chemical luminescence. Topics may include photo-acoustic spectroscopy, multielement analysis, X-ray fluorescence and modern multiwavelength detector systems.

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CHEM 603 Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy.

(5)

CHEM 611 Inorganic Topics 2.

(4) This advanced level course surveys recent trends in inorganic chemistry. Students select a topic from the current literature, research the topic, present periodic oral reports and a final summary paper. The instructor participates as a tutor and gives occasional oral presentations on topics of his choice.

CHEM 612 Organometallic Chemistry.

(5) A first course at the graduate level in organometallic chemistry. The theory and practice of the field is treated starting from basic principles of inorganic and organic chemistry.

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CHEM 619 Advanced Atmospheric Chemistry.

(4)

CHEM 621 Recent Advances in Organic Chemistry.

(5) A systematic survey of the mechanisms of the most common organic reactions from studies of reactions in the current literature.

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CHEM 623 Stereochemistry.

(5)

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CHEM 626D1 (2), CHEM 626D2 (2) Fundamentals of Medicinal Chemistry.

(Students must register for both CHEM 626D1 and CHEM 626D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both CHEM 626D1 and CHEM 626D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)

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CHEM 627 Special Topics 2.

(5)

CHEM 629 Organic Synthesis.

(5) An advanced course in the synthesis of organic molecules with an emphasis on stereoselective transformations. Topics will include multiple bond formation, functional group interconversions, carbon-carbon bond formation and stereoselective oxidations and reductions.

CHEM 631D1 (2), CHEM 631D2 (2) Selected Topics in Analytical Chemistry.

(Students must register for both CHEM 631D1 and CHEM 631D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both CHEM 631D1 and CHEM 631D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) A directed reading course with individual student-professor conferences, and intended mainly for students specializing in analytical chemistry. Topics are chosen to meet the individual needs of each student.

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CHEM 634 Seminar in Advanced Materials.

(3)

CHEM 636 Laboratory Automation 2.

(5) (Prerequisite: CHEM 547) Students will undertake a chemical laboratory automation project. Design and implementation problems will be discussed by the students in seminars and advanced topics in automated chemical instrumentation will be presented. Several experiments will be required.

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CHEM 643 Organic Chemistry / Wood Components.

(4)

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CHEM 645 Quantum Mechanics.

(5)

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CHEM 645D1 (2.5), CHEM 645D2 (2.5) Quantum Mechanics.

(Students must register for both CHEM 645D1 and CHEM 645D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both CHEM 645D1 and CHEM 645D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (CHEM 645D1 and CHEM 645D2 together are equivalent to CHEM 645)

CHEM 646 Advanced Statistical Mechanics.

(4) Intermediate and advanced topics in statistical mechanics. Material to be covered will include: graphical methods, modern theories of dense gases and liquids, static and dynamic critical phenomena, time-correlation functions, light-scattering and nonequilibrium phenomena.

CHEM 647 Physical Chemistry: Special Topic 1.

(4)

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CHEM 648 Physical Chemistry: Special Topic 2.

(4)

CHEM 650 Seminars in Chemistry 1.

(1) (1 seminar) (Required of first year graduate students in Chemistry.) A seminar course designed for graduate students in chemistry which in conjunction with McGill Chemical Society will provide exposure to a broad range of special topics within the discipline.

CHEM 651 Seminars in Chemistry 2.

(1) (1 seminar) (Required of first year graduate students in Chemistry.) A seminar course designed for graduate students in chemistry which in conjunction with McGill Chemical Society will provide exposure to a broad range of special topics within the discipline.

CHEM 655 Advanced NMR Spectroscopy.

(4) (1 lecture) (Prerequisite: CHEM 555 or equivalent.) Advanced techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform methods, multiple pulsing, two-dimensional pulse sequencing.

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CHEM 661 Literature Review and Proposal.

(3) (Restricted to graduate students in Chemistry.)

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CHEM 662 Research Report 1.

(3) (Restricted to graduate students in Chemistry.)

CHEM 666D1 (3), CHEM 666D2 (3) Special Topics 2.

(Students must register for both CHEM 666D1 and CHEM 666D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both CHEM 666D1 and CHEM 666D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Critical and original essays are required on various subjects of current interest in chemistry.

CHEM 667 Special Topics.

(4) Critical and original essays are required on various subjects of current interest in chemistry.

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CHEM 672 The Polymer Solid State.

(4)

CHEM 673 Polymers in Solutions.

(4) Thermodynamics of regular and of polymer solutions; osmotic pressure; phase separations; polymer configurations; light scattering; ultracentrifugation; viscometry; gel permeation chromatography; polyelectrolytes.

CHEM 674 Introductory Physical Chemistry - Polymers.

(4) A survey course on the structure of polymers; kinetics and mechanisms of polymer synthesis; molecular weight distributions; polymer configurations and the thermodynamics of polymer solutions; rubber, elasticity, osmometry and viscosity.

CHEM 675 Mechanical Properties and Rheology - Polymers.

(4) Mechanical properties of polymers; glass transition, visco-elasticity, rubber elasticity, failure. Relation to molecular properties, mechanical spectroscopy, dielectric properties, birefringence.

CHEM 686 Wet-End Papermaking Chemistry.

(3) (Restricted to graduate students in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering or permission of instructor.) (Prerequisites: CHEM 543 and CHEM 585) Review of the chemistry of various additives used in papermaking, such as wet and dry strength agents, sizing agents, fillers, filler retention aids, antifoam agents, biocides, dyes, dewatering agents, drainage and formation aids. The course also addresses the chemistry of deinking of waste papers and the treatment of effluents.

CHEM 688 Assessment.

(3) (Restriction: Restricted to graduate students in Chemistry.) An evaluation that is completed before the end of the second year of registration.

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CHEM 689 Seminars in Chemical Biology 2.

(1) (Restrictions: Open only to students registered for the M.Sc. or Ph.D. Graduate Option in Chemical Biology.)

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CHEM 690 Seminars in Chemical Biology 4.

(1) (Restrictions: Open only to students registered for the M.Sc. or Ph.D. Graduate Option in Chemical Biology.)

CHEM 691 M.Sc. Thesis Research.

(3) Independent research work leading to writing of M.Sc. thesis for final submission to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office.

CHEM 692 M.Sc. Thesis Research.

(6) Independent research work leading to writing of M.Sc. thesis for final submission to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office.

CHEM 693 M.Sc. Thesis Research.

(9) Independent research work leading to writing of M.Sc. thesis for final submission to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office.

CHEM 694 M.Sc. Thesis Research.

(12) Independent research work leading to writing of M.Sc. thesis for final submission to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office.

CHEM 695 M.Sc. Thesis Research.

(15) Independent research work leading to writing of M.Sc. thesis for final submission to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office.

CHEM 696 M.Sc. Thesis Research.

(6) Independent research work leading to writing of M.Sc. thesis for final submission to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office.

CHEM 697 M.Sc. Thesis Research.

(9) Independent research work leading to writing of M.Sc. thesis for final submission to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office.

CHEM 698 M.Sc. Thesis Research.

(12) Independent research work leading to writing of M.Sc. thesis for final submission to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office.

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CHEM 699 Project.

(15)

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CHEM 699D1 (7.5), CHEM 699D2 (7.5) Project.

(Students must register for both CHEM 699D1 and CHEM 699D2) (No credit will be given for this course unless both CHEM 699D1 and CHEM 699D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (CHEM 699D1 and CHEM 699D2 together are equivalent to CHEM 699)

CHEM 701 Comprehensive Examination 1.

(0) (Restriction : Restricted to Ph.D. students in Chemistry.) An evaluation that is completed before the end of the third year of registration.

CHEM 702 Comprehensive Examination 2.

(0) (Restriction : Restricted to Ph.D. students in Chemistry.) An evaluation that is completed before the end of the fourth year of registration.

CHEM 721 Organic Chemistry Research Seminar.

(3) Upon completion of the organic cumulative examinations, students will present a seminar on their research work (including background and future plans).

CHEM 763 Research Report 2.

(3) (Restricted to graduate students in Chemistry.) Students will present a seminar on a complete or nearly complete research project and discuss these results.

15 Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics
Macdonald Engineering Building
817 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2K6
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-6858
Fax: (514) 398-7361
E-mail: gradinfo.civil@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/civil 
Chair
D. Mitchell
Chair of Graduate Program
G. McClure (Acting)

15.1 Staff

Emeritus Professors
P.J. Harris; B.Sc.(Man.), M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), F.E.I.C., F.C.S.C.E., Eng.
R.G. Redwood; B.Sc.(Bristol), M.A.Sc.(Tor.), Ph.D.(Bristol), F.C.S.C.E., FI Struct. Eng., Eng.
S.B. Savage; B.Eng.(McG.), M.S.Eng.(Cal.Tech.), Ph.D.(McG.), F.R.S.C.
Professors
V.H. Chu; B.S.Eng.(Taiwan), M.A.Sc.(Tor.), Ph.D.(M.I.T.), Eng.
M.S. Mirza; M.S., B.Eng.(Karachi), M.Eng., Ph.D.(McG.), F.E.I.C., F.C.S.C.E., F.A.C.I., Hon.F.I.E.P., Eng.
D. Mitchell; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.), F.A.C.I., Eng.
V.T.V. Nguyen; B.M.E.(Vietnam), M.C.E.(A.I.T.), D.A.Sc.(Montr.), Eng.
J. Nicell; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Windsor), P.Eng.
A.P.S. Selvadurai; M.S.(Stan.), Ph.D., D.Sc.(Nott.), F.E.I.C., F.I.M.A., F.C.S.C.E., P.Eng.
S.C. Shrivastava; B.Sc.(Eng.)(Vikram), M.C.E.(Del.), Sc.D.(Col.), Eng.
Associate Professors
L. Chouinard; B.Ing., M.Ing.(Montr.), B.C.L.(McG.), Sc.D.(M.I.T.), Eng.
S.J. Gaskin; B.Sc.(Eng.) (Qu.), Ph.D.(Cant.), Eng.
R. Gehr; B.Sc.(Eng.) (Witw.), M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.), P.Eng.
S. Ghoshal; B.C.E.(India), M.S.(Missouri), Ph.D.(Carnegie Mellon)
G. McClure; B.Ing.(Mont.), S.M.C.E.(M.I.T.), Ph.D.(Mont.), Eng.
Y. Shao; B.Sc., M.S.(Tongji), Ph.D.(Northwestern)
Assistant Professors
M. Haider; B.Sc.(Peshwar), M.A.Sc., Ph.D.(Tor.),
C. Rogers; B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc.(Wat.), Ph.D.(Sydney), P.Eng.
Adjunct Professors
S. Babarutsi, J.P. Desmarais, S. Guiot, J. Hadjinicolaou, J. Hawari, P. Henshaw, G. Holder, E. Lecollettier, Z. Lounis, K. MacKenzie, C. Manatakos, T.S. Nguyen, P. Rodrigue, S. Scola, W. Taylor, J. Vrana, A. Zaki, R. Zaloum

15.2 Programs Offered

Advanced courses of instruction and laboratory facilities are available for engineering graduate students desiring to proceed to the degrees of M.Eng., M.Sc. and Ph.D.

Graduate studies and research are at present being conducted in the fields of structures and structural mechanics, rehabilitation, fluid mechanics and hydraulics, materials engineering, soil behaviour, soil mechanics and foundations, water resources engineering, environmental engineering and transportation engineering.

M.Eng. (Project) in Civil Engineering - Option in Rehabilitation of Urban Infrastructure

This program is offered to students with a university undergraduate degree in engineering who want to specialize in the field of maintenance and rehabilitation of urban infrastructures. It is offered jointly by McGill University and École de Technologie Supérieure, École Polytechnique de Montréal, and Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique - Urbanisation. A student registered at McGill is required to take courses at the other three institutions.

M. Eng. (Environmental Engineering Option)

This program is offered to students with a university undergraduate degree in engineering who desire graduate education in the environmental engineering field. This option is within the context of the existing M.Eng. (Project Option) programs currently offered in the Departments of Bioresource, Chemical, Civil, and Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering. This program emphasizes interdisciplinary fundamental knowledge courses, practical applications in diverse environmental contexts, and functional skills needed for solving environmental problems. Candidates must possess a Bachelor's degree in engineering with superior academic achievement (a minimum of CGPA of 3.0 out of a possible 4.0).

M.Sc.

Candidates with a Bachelor's degree in a discipline other than Engineering, such as Science or Arts, may be accepted into a M.Sc. program in the Department. Such students would typically study in the fluid mechanics, water resources, or environmental engineering areas, and would follow the Thesis Option program, as outlined in section 15.5 "Program Requirements".

15.3 Admission Requirements

The general rules of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office apply and are detailed in the General Information section. The minimum academic standard for admission is a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 3.0/4.0 or better.

Applicants whose native language is not English or French, and who have not completed an undergraduate degree in Canada, are expected to achieve a grade of 580 or better on the paper-based (237 on the computer-based) Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) for entry to the Ph.D. program, and 550 on the paper-based (213 on the computer-based) TOEFL for other programs. The test is administered by the Educational Testing Service and is easily available throughout the world. The results reach McGill approximately eight weeks after the test is taken. It is the student's responsibility to make the necessary arrangements with the examining board to write the test in the country of residence. Full information about the Test and a registration form may be obtained by writing to: Test of English as a Foreign Language, Box 6191, Princeton, New Jersey 08540-6151, U.S.A.

15.4 Application Procedures

Applications will be considered upon receipt of:

Applicants for entry into a graduate program are requested to address their completed forms for admission to the Chair of the Graduate Studies Admissions Committee, Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics.

Applications for September admission should be submitted by March 1, and those for January admission by August 1 (international students) and October 1 (Canadian students).

McGill's on-line application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/applying/graduate.

15.5 Program Requirements

M.Eng.

Candidates may satisfy the requirements for the M.Eng. degree by following one of two options:

Thesis Option

program (45 credits) requires a research thesis (27 credits), a compulsory Masters Research Seminar CIVE 662 (1 credit), and a minimum of five courses at the 500 or 600 level (17 credits). The thesis describing the candidate's research is to be submitted in accordance with the regulations of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office.

Project Option

program requires a minimum of 30 credits of course work plus a project, the total amounting to 45 credits. The credits assigned to the project can vary between 5 and 15 depending on the amount of work involved.

Both programs normally require that course work credits be earned at the 500 and 600 levels. However, at least two courses must be taken at the 600 level. The above minimum course requirements for both options pertain to well prepared students; others may be required to take additional courses as a condition of acceptance or as determined in consultation with their director of studies or research. Only one 400-level Civil Engineering course may be counted towards program requirements.

Three terms of resident study at McGill are required for the degree. This is a minimum requirement and usually a longer period will be necessary. This residence requirement can also be satisfied by Project Option students through part-time (evening) studies over a period of three or more years.

Master of Engineering (Environmental Engineering Option)

The program consists of a minimum of 45 credits, of which, depending on the student's home department, a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 15 may be allotted to the project. The balance is earned by coursework, of which one to three approved undergraduate (below 500-level) courses are allowed.

To complete the option, students must:

- complete four (4) required core courses (see section A below);

- complete a minimum of two (2) engineering courses (see section B below);

- complete a minimum of two (2) non-engineering courses (each course should be chosen from a different department) (see section C below)

- complete a design or research project of 5 to 15 credits

- complete all the remaining courses (to a total of at least 45 credits) as required in the student's departmental program (these courses must be approved by the student's Academic Advisor); and

- obtain a grade of B- (or 65%) or better in all required and approved courses

Prerequisite

(Not credited to the Master Environmental Engineering Option Program) CIVE 225 Environmental Engineering or equivalent environmental engineering courses.

A. Required Core Courses

CHEE 591 Environmental Bioremediation

CIVE 555 Environmental Data Analysis

  or AEMA 611 Experimental Designs

CIVE 615 Environmental Engineering

OCCH 612 Principles of Toxicology

  or FDSC 505 Health Risks of Toxicants

B. Elective Engineering Courses

These are to be chosen from a list of specific courses offered by the following Engineering Departments:

Bioresource Engineering

Chemical Engineering

Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics

Mechanical Engineering

Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering

C. Elective Non-engineering Courses

These are to be chosen from a list of specific courses offered by the following units:

Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Department of Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences

Department of Biology

Department of Chemistry

Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

Department of Economics
McGill School of Environment

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Department of Geography

Faculty of Law

Faculty of Management

Department of Occupational Health

Department of Political Science

Faculty of Religious Studies

Department of Sociology

School of Urban Planning

The Environmental Engineering Option Program is administered by the Faculty of Engineering. Further information may be obtained from the Program Coordinator, Department of Civil Engineering and Applied Mechanics.

M.Eng. (Project) in Civil Engineering -
Option in Rehabilitation of Urban Infrastructure

This program is offered jointly by McGill University, École de Technologie Supérieure, École Polytechnique de Montréal, and Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique - Urbanisation. A student registered at McGill is required to take courses at the other three institutions.

The program leads to a professional non-thesis (Project Option) degree with a minimum of 45 credits divided in three modules described below. Depending on their background and interests, students would specialize in one or two out of three possible areas: (1) underground water supply and drainage systems; (2) road infrastructure; (3) bridges, overpasses and tunnels. Students registered at McGill can specialize in area 3 or jointly in areas 2 and 3: students interested in other program scenarios are encouraged to register at one of the other three participating institutions.

Module 1 Required courses
(15 credits)
CIV(1) 6313 Méthodologie de réhabilitation des infrastructures 
urbaines 
MGC(2) 810 Gestion des projets de construction et de réhabilita-
tion 
CIVE 512(3) Advanced Civil Engineering Materials (required for 
McGill students) 
RIU(5) 9500 Analyse du processus de décision et choix tech-
nologiques 
RIU 9501 Financement des infrastructures et finances publiques 
locales 
Module 2 Specialized courses
(15 credits)

Elective courses in rehabilitation (6 to 12 credits)

Area 1 Underground water supply and drainage systems

CIV 6314 Évaluation des systèmes d'alimentation en eau et 
d'assainissement 
GCI 745 Réhabilitation des systèmes d'alimentation en eau et 
d'assainissement 

Area 2 Road Infrastructure

MGC 835 Évaluation des chausées 
MGC 840 Conception et réhabilitation des chausées 

Area 3 Bridges, overpasses and tunnels

CIVE 527 Renovation and Preservation: Infrastructure 
CIVE 617 Design and Rating of Highway and Railway Bridges 
(required for McGill students) 
or CIV 6511 Conception et évaluation des ponts 

Other graduate electives (3 to 9 credits) to be approved by the inter-university program coordination committee. McGill students specializing in area 3 are required to take at least 6 credits at McGill, while those specializing in areas 2 and 3 must take 3 credits at McGill.

Module 3 Integration
(15 credits)
Research project (15 credits)

Documentation outlining the program and giving additional information is available on request.

M.Sc.

Candidates with a Bachelor's degree in a discipline other than Engineering, such as Science or Arts, may be accepted into a M.Sc. program in the Department. Such students would typically study in the fluid mechanics, water resources, or environmental engineering areas, and would follow the Thesis Option program requirements.

Ph.D.

Candidates normally register for the M.Eng. degree, Thesis Option, or M.Sc. degree in the first instance. Those who have a Master's degree acceptable to the Department may, however, be considered for direct registration for the Ph.D. degree (Ph.D.II).

The Ph.D. program consists of a research project and courses as required to develop the candidate's background. Candidates are expected to take a comprehensive preliminary oral examination (course CIVE 701) within the first year of their Ph.D. registration. They must fulfill the requirements outlined in the General Information section of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar. There is no foreign language requirement.

Direct transfer into the Ph.D. program (fast-tracking) may be available for students who have demonstrated a superior record in the undergraduate program.

15.6 Courses for Higher Degrees

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.

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CIVE 512 Advanced Civil Engineering Materials.

(3) (3-3-3) (Prerequisite: CIVE 202)

CIVE 514 Structural Mechanics.

(3) (3-1-5) Stress, strain, and basic equations of linear elasticity. General and particular solutions of plane and axisymmetric problems. Stress concentration and failure criteria. Unsymmetrical bending of beams; shear centres; torsion of thin-walled structural members. Curved beams. Formulation and applications of energy principles, and their connection to finite-element method.

CIVE 519 Sustainable Development Plans.

(6) (Corequisites: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester"; AGRI 413, AGRI 452 or CIVE 452, URBP 507) (Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken AGRI 519 or URBP 519. Permission of the Coordinator of the Field Semester required.) Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of 2 to 4 students in collaboration with them.

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CIVE 526 Solid Waste Management.

(3) (3-2-4) (Prerequisite: CIVE 225)

CIVE 527 Renovation and Preservation: Infrastructure.

(3) (3-2-4) (Undergraduate Prerequisites: CIVE 202 and CIVE 318) Maintenance, rehabilitation, renovation and preservation of infrastructure; infrastructure degradation mechanisms; mechanical, chemical and biological degradation; corrosion of steel; condition surveys and evaluation of buildings and bridges; repair and preservation materials, techniques and strategies; codes and guidelines; case studies.

CIVE 540 Urban Transportation Planning.

(3) (3-1-5) (Prerequisite: CIVE 319 or permission of instructor.) Process and techniques of urban transportation engineering and planning, including demand analysis framework, data collection procedures, travel demand modelling and forecasting, and cost-effectiveness framework for evaluation of project and system alternatives.

l

CIVE 546 Selected Topics in Civil Engineering 1.

(3) (3-0-6) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: Permission of instructor)

l

CIVE 550 Water Resources Management.

(3) (3-0-6) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: CIVE 323 or equivalent)

l

CIVE 553 Stream Pollution and Control.

(3) (3-2-4) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: CIVE 225)

CIVE 555 Environmental Data Analysis.

(3) (3-0-6) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: CIVE 302 or permission of instructor) Application of statistical principles to design of measurement systems and sampling programs. Introduction to experimental design. Graphical data analysis. Description of uncertainty. Hypothesis tests. Model parameter estimation methods: linear and nonlinear regression methods. Trend analysis. Statistical analysis of censored data. Statistics of extremes.

l

CIVE 572 Computational Hydraulics.

(3) (3-0-6) (Prerequisite: CIVE 327 or equivalent)

CIVE 573 Hydraulic Structures.

(3) (3-0-6) (Prerequisites: CIVE 323 and CIVE 327) Hydraulic aspects of the theory and design of hydraulic structures. Storage dams, spillways, outlet works, diversion works, drop structures, stone structures, conveyance and control structures, flow measurement and culverts.

l

CIVE 574 Fluid Mechanics of Water Pollution.

(3) (Prerequisite: CIVE 327 or equivalent.)

l

CIVE 577 River Engineering.

(3) (3-0-6) (Undergraduate Prerequisite: CIVE 428 or permission of the instructor.) (Graduate Corequisite: CIVE 428)

CIVE 602 Finite Element Analysis.

(4) (Prerequisite: CIVE 514) Development of displacement based simple and high order, one, two and three dimensional elements for linear elastic stress analysis. Variational and other methods for element formulation. Plate bending and shell elements. Finite element programming. Use of package programs in static analysis of structures.

l

CIVE 603 Structural Dynamics.

(4)

l

CIVE 604 Theory of Plates and Shells.

(4)

CIVE 605 Stability of Structures.

(4) Buckling of elastic columns by equilibrium analysis. Buckling of inelastic columns. Energy analysis and approximate methods. Stability of frames. Torsional buckling of columns and flexural-torsional buckling of beams. Buckling of plates and axially compressed circular cylindrical shells. Stability analysis using the finite element method.

CIVE 607 Advanced Design in Steel.

(4) Design and behaviour of cold formed and hot rolled structural steel members and systems. Lateral load resistance design of steel roof diaphragms, flexural design of composite slabs, bracing requirements and design procedures for steel structures, floor vibration, member torsion, slender members and design procedures for low rise steel frame buildings.

l

CIVE 609 Risk Engineering.

(4)

CIVE 610 Special Topics in Structural Mechanics.

(4) Special problems in the theory and design of structures. These may include topics in the theories of elasticity and plasticity and advanced theories of shell structures.

CIVE 612 Earthquake-Resistant Design.

(4) Static and dynamic analyses, design codes, effects of local ground conditions, ductility demands on structural components. Inelastic behaviour of beams, columns, joints, shear walls and bracing under cyclic loading of steel concrete and masonry structures. Design applications.

l

CIVE 614 Composites for Construction.

(4)

CIVE 615 Environmental Engr. Seminar

(3) The course will expose the students to various environmental engineering issues. Lectures will be given by faculty and invited speakers from industry. Each student is required to prepare a written technical paper and make oral presentation.

l

CIVE 617 Design and Rating of Highway and Railway Bridges.

(4)

CIVE 618 Design in Concrete 1.

(4) Concrete physical properties, creep, shrinkage; review of ultimate strength design; combined loadings; design of frames and flat plates; limit design, yield line theory; prestressed concrete, partial prestressing and load balancing. The course will include group projects.

l

CIVE 622 Prestressed Concrete.

(4)

l

CIVE 623 Durability of Materials.

(4)

CIVE 624 Durability of Structures.

(4) Basic concepts, safety, durability, repair and strengthening; reliability analysis; deterioration mechanisms, preventive and corrective measures; design for durability; parking structures; bridges; steel, timber and masonry structures; municipal infrastructure; strengthening and retrofitting; management systems; case studies. This course will involve field trips and group design exercises.

l

CIVE 628 Design of Wood Structures.

(4)

CIVE 630 Thesis Research 1.

(3)

CIVE 631 Thesis Research 2.

(3)

CIVE 632 Thesis Research 3.

(3)

CIVE 633 Thesis Research 4.

(6)

CIVE 634 Thesis Research 5.

(6)

CIVE 635 Thesis Research 6.

(6)

l

CIVE 648 Special Topics in Civil Engineering.

(4)

CIVE 651 Theory: Water / Wastewater Treatment.

(4) Theoretical aspects of the chemistry of water and wastewater treatment. This will include acid-base and solubility equilibria; redox reactions; reaction kinetics; reactor design; surface and colloid chemistry; gas transfer; mass transfer; stabilization and softening; disinfection; corrosion.

CIVE 652 Biological Treatment: Wastewaters.

(4) Process kinetics and reactors. Population kinetics of microorganisms and their role in the various waste treatment processes. Unit processes for wastewater treatment, such as suspended-growth, attached-growth processes, sludge treatment, and nutrient removal. Biological treatment techniques for groundwater decontamination. Laboratory pilot plant exercises.

CIVE 660 Chemical and Physical Treatment of Waters.

(4) Theory and design of specific processes used for the physical and/or chemical purification of waters and wastewaters, including mixing, flocculation, sedimentation, flotation, filtration, disinfection, adsorption, ion exchange, aeration, membrane processes, distillation, removal of specific inorganics and organics, taste and odour control, process control, sludge treatment. Laboratory exercises will complement theoretical aspects.

l

CIVE 662 Masters Research Seminar.

(1) (Restriction: For civil engineering students in the final semester of the thesis masters program.)

CIVE 678 Gravity Currents.

(4) Internal hydraulics of one-layer and two-layers systems. Boussinesq's approximation, concepts of specific energy and specific force, upstream and downstream influences. Waves, instabilities and turbulence in continuous stratified flows; the flux, gradient and local Richardson numbers. Turbulent mixing and entrainment across gravity and turbulent interfaces. Turbulent thermals, turbulent plumes and related mixing phenomena.

l

CIVE 684 Groundwater Pollution and Transport Processes.

(4)

CIVE 686 Site Remediation.

(4) Field investigations; geotechnical and geophysical techniques; hydrogeological conditions; risk assessment; contaminant transport; remedial action plan; containment systems (gas, surface water, and ground water); on-site and off-site treatment techniques (solidification, stabilization, landfilling, and soil washing); In-situtreatment techniques (physical, biological, and chemical).

CIVE 691 Project 1.

(1)

CIVE 692 Research Project.

(2)

CIVE 693 Research Project.

(3)

CIVE 694 Project 4.

(4)

CIVE 695 Project 5.

(5)

CIVE 696 Research Project.

(6)

CIVE 697 Research Project.

(7)

CIVE 701 Ph.D. Comprehensive Preliminary Oral Exam.

(0)

16 Classics

Graduate Program in Classics
Department of History
Stephen Leacock Building, Room 625
855 Sherbrooke Street West
Montreal, QC  H3A 2T7
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-3977
Fax: (514) 398-8365
E-mail: graduate.history@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.arts.mcgill.ca/programs/history 

16.1 Staff

Emeritus Professors
P. F. McCullagh; B.A.(Tor.), M.A.(McG.), Ph.D.(Chic.)
P. Vivante; B.A.(Oxon), Dott.Lett.(Florence) (John MacNaughton Emeritus Professor of Classics)
Professor
T. Wade Richardson; B.A.(McG.), A.M., Ph.D.(Harv.)

16.2 Programs Offered

M.A. with Thesis

(48 credits over 4 terms, in 18 or 24 months)

M.A. non-Thesis option

(48 credits over 3 or 4 terms, in 18 months)

Ph.D.

16.3 Admission Requirements

M.A. Program

Candidates are required to have a B.A. Honours in Classics or equivalent.

Ph.D. Program

Candidates are required to have a McGill M.A. in Classics or equivalent.

16.4 Application Procedures

No applications will be accepted for 2004-05 as the program has been temporarily suspended. Further information may be obtained from the Department of History.

16.5 Program Requirements

Please consult the Department for detailed regulations.

M.A. with thesis

M.A. non-thesis option

Ph.D.

16.6 Courses Offered

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

CLAS 515D1 (3), CLAS 515D2 (3) Latin Authors.

(Undergraduate Prerequisite: 9 credits in Intermediate Latin or equivalent) (Restricted to Honours and Graduate students) (Students must register for both CLAS 515D1 and CLAS 515D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both CLAS 515D1 and CLAS 515D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Completion of a Reading List in Latin, with Faculty supervision, to be tested by written examination.

CLAS 525D1 (3), CLAS 525D2 (3) Ancient Greek Authors.

(Undergraduate Prerequisite: 9 credits in Intermediate Greek or equivalent) (Restricted to Honours and Graduate students) (Students must register for both CLAS 525D1 and CLAS 525D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both CLAS 525D1 and CLAS 525D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Completion of a Reading List in Greek, with Faculty supervision, to be tested by written examination.

17 Communication Sciences and Disorders

School of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Beatty Hall
1266 Pine Avenue West
Montreal, QC  H3G 1A8
Canada 
Telephone: (514) 398-4137
Fax: (514) 398-8123
E-mail: scsd@mcgill.ca
Web site: www.mcgill.ca/scsd 
Director
Shari Baum
Research Director
Elin Thordardottir

17.1 Staff

Emeritus Professor
Donald Doehring; B.A.(Buff.), M.A.(N.M.), Ph.D.(Ind.)
Professors
Shari Baum; B.A.(C'nell), M.S.(Vt.), M.A., Ph.D.(Brown)
Martha Crago; B.A., M.Sc.A., Ph.D.(McG.)
Athanasios Katsarkas; M.D.(Thess.), M.Sc.(McG.), F.R.C.P.(C)
Associate Professors
Vincent Gracco; B.A., M.A.(San Diego), Ph.D.(Wis.-Madison)
Rachel Mayberry; B.A.(Drake), M.S.(Wash.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Marc Pell; B.A.(Ott.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Linda Polka; B.A.(Slippery Rock), M.A.(Minn.), Ph.D.(S.Flor.)
Assistant Professors
Karsten Steinhauer; M.Sc.,Ph.d. (Dr.rer.nat)F.U.Berlin
Elin Thordardottir; B.A., M.Sc., Ph.D.(Wis.-Madison)
Assistant Professor (Special Category)
Susan Rvachew; B.Sc.(Alta.), M.Sc., Ph.D.(Calg.)
Assistant Professors (Part-Time)
Gabriel Leonard; B.A.(Dublin), D.A.P., M.Sc., Ph.D.(McG.)
Sybil Schwartz; B.Sc.(McG.), M.Sc.A.(Iowa St.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Rosalee Shenker; B.Sc.(Syr.), M.A.(Calif. St.), Ph.D.(McG.)
Faculty Lecturer
Jeanne Claessen; M.A.(Reading), Dip. Clinical Communication Studies(City University, London)
Faculty Lecturers (Part-Time)
Areej Alasseri; B.Sc. (King Saud U.), M.A. (San Jose St.U.)
Joane Déziel; B.Sc, M.Sc.(Montr.)
Caroline Erdos; B.A. (C'dia), M.Sc.A.(McG.)
Ruth Gesser; B.A.(C'dia), M.Sc.A.(McG.)
Jill Harrisson; B.A., M.Sc.(McG.)
Helena Kisilevsky; B.A.(McG.), M.A.(UCLA), M.O.A.(Montr.)
Cathy Mhun; B.A., M.Sc.A.(McG.)
Darla Orchard; B.A., M.Sc.(McG.)
Judith Robillard-Shultz; B.A., M.Sc.A.(McG.)
Phaedra Royle; B.A.(C'dia), M.A.(McG.), Ph.D.(Montr.)
Amee Shah; B.Sc. ASR, M.A. Ling. (Bom.), M.A.-SLP,
M.Phil.,Ph.D. C.U.N.Y.)
Megha Sundara; B.Sc., M.Sc.(All India Inst. of Speech & Hearing)
Colleen Timm; B.A.(C'dia), M.Sc.A.(McG.)
Patricia Viens; ASLTA Certificate(Rochester I.T.), ASL Workshop Certificate(Vista U.)
Associate Members
Eva Kehayia (Physical and Occupational Therapy)
Yuriko Oshima-Takane (Psychology)
Adjunct Members
Howard Chertkow (Jewish Gen.), David McFarland (Montr.)

17.2 Programs Offered

The School offers a professional degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders at the M.Sc. (Applied) level with specialization in Speech-Language Pathology and two research degrees, an M.Sc. (Research) and a Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

M.Sc.(Applied) Degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders

The professional degree leads to a Master of Science (Applied) with a specialization in Speech-Language Pathology. The program involves two academic years of full-time study and related practical work followed by a summer internship. To prepare students as creative professionals, the program emphasizes the understanding of principles and theories, and their present or potential clinical applications, in addition to the teaching of specific techniques for assessment and intervention. Active participation in the learning process is encouraged.

The profession of Speech-Language Pathology concerns assessment and intervention in speech and language disorders. In particular, the Speech-Language Pathologist is concerned with two major parameters of communication sciences and disorders: language and speech. At present, most speech-language pathologists in Canada work in hospitals, public school systems, rehabilitation centres, and in special education facilities.

Requirements for Licensure

- The majority of provinces in Canada and certain states in the U.S.A. require that those intending to practice as Speech-Language Pathologists within their borders comply with special provincial or state licensing regulations. Graduates wishing to practice in the province of Quebec must be members of l'Ordre des Orthophonistes et Audiologistes du Québec (OOAQ) in order to call themselves Speech-Language Pathologists. Further information is available from the OOAQ, 235, boulevard René Levésque est, bureau 601, Montréal (Québec) H2X 1N8. Telephone: (514) 282-9123. Web site: www.ooaq.qc.ca

Quebec law requires that candidates seeking licensure in provincially recognized professions demonstrate a verbal and written working knowledge of the French language. See the Language Requirements for Professions in the General Information and Regulations section of the Health Sciences Calendar.

Research Degrees - M.Sc. and Ph.D.

Selected candidates may be accepted for the M.Sc. and Ph.D. research degrees. Each student's Thesis supervisor and Thesis Committee design an individualized program of study in collaboration with the student. The program can include graduate courses offered by the School and by other departments at McGill.

Ph.D. Option in Language Acquisition (LAP)

Information about this option is available from the School and on the Web at http://psych.mcgill.ca

Funding

The IODE Provincial Chapter of Quebec funds two $1,000. "Silence to Sound" awards for studies in hearing impairment. These in-course awards are based on academic merit, financial need, and potential for excellence are awarded by the School.

Montreal League for the Hard of Hearing Award.
Candidates must be enrolled at the graduate level in the School and working in the area of hearing impairment. Awarded by the School. Value - up to $1,000.

17.3 Admissions Requirements

M.Sc.(Applied)

An applicant must hold an undergraduate degree with a minimum B average (3.0 on a 4.0 point scale) or better in areas relevant to the selected field of specialization. Specific requirements are six credits in statistics, a total of 18 credits across the disciplines of psychology and linguistics (with a minimum of six credits in each discipline). Knowledge of physiology is also desirable.

M.Sc. in Communication Sciences and Disorders

The M.Sc. provides research training for:

Ph.D. in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Applicants should normally have a Master's degree with thesis or its equivalent in Communication Sciences and Disorders or a related field (e.g., psychology, linguistics).

Students who possess an appropriate Bachelor's degree or Master's degree without thesis will also be considered for the Ph.D. program, but, if admitted, must first complete a qualifying year of coursework and a research project in the School ("fast-track" option).

17.4 Application Procedures

Please see the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders website at: www.mcgill.ca/scsd/application for required application materials.

School of Communication Sciences and Disorders will only consider applications upon receipt of the following documentation prior to the February 1st deadline.

- On-line application

- Information Form

- Prerequisite Form

- Personal Statement

- Two letters of Reccomendation

- Two official copies of Trasncripts from all Universities attended

Non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue is not English and who have not completed an undergraduate degree from a recognized institution where English is the language of instruction are required to submit documented proof of competency in oral and written English prior to admission: the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum score of 550 (paper-based) or 213 (computer-based), or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) with a minimum overall band score of 6.5.

M.Sc. (thesis) and Ph.D. programs

Application for Fall admission are processed shortly after the deadline of February 22. All applications received by that date are automatically considered for any internal funding or awards made available to the department for recruitment purposes. Applications for Winter or Summer admission are processed when they are received, but must be received no later than August 1 (Winter admission) or December 15 (Summer admission). Students who apply for Fall admission generally have the most options with respect to applying for external funding as well as for being considered for internal support.

Applications will be considered upon receipt of supporting documentsas outlined above. All applicants strongly encouraged to submit reports of their performance on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

17.5 Program Requirements

M.Sc.(Applied) Degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders
(68 credits)

The professional degree program leads to a Master of Science, Applied degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders with a specialization in Speech-Language Pathology. The program involves two academic years of full-time study and related practical work followed by a summer internship.

Year 1 Required Courses
(31 credits)
Fall
SCSD 616
(3)
Audiology
SCSD 617
(3)
Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing
SCSD 619
(3)
Phonological Development
SCSD 624
(3)
Language Processes
SCSD 633
(3)
Language Development
SCSD 681
(1)
Practicum and Seminar 1
Winter
SCSD 631
(3)
Speech Science
SCSD 632
(3)
Phonological Disorders: Children
SCSD 637
(3)
Developmental Language Disorders 1
SCSD 638
(3)
Neurolinguistics
SCSD 682
(1)
Practicum and Seminar 2
Summer
SCSD 646
(2)
Introductory Clinical Practicum
Year 1 Complementary Course
(3 credits)
One three-credit seminar option must be taken.
Year 2 Required Courses
(31 credits)
Fall
SCSD 618
(3)
Research and Measurement Methodologies
SCSD 636
(3)
Fluency Disorders
SCSD 639
(3)
Voice Disorders
SCSD 643
(3)
Developmental Language Disorders 2
SCSD 644
(3)
Applied Neurolinguistics
SCSD 683
(1)
Practicum and Seminar 3
Winter
SCSD 609
(3)
Neuromotor Disorders
SCSD 642
(3)
Aural Rehabilitation
SCSD 669
(3)
Special Developmental Speech/Language Problems
SCSD 680
(3)
Deglutition and Dysphagia
SCSD 684
(1)
Practicum and Seminar 4
Summer
SCSD 679
(2)
Advanced Clinical Practicum
Year 2 Complementary Course
(3 credits)
One three-credit seminar option must be taken.
M.Sc.(Applied) Complementary Course List
SCSD 634
(3)
Research and Measurement Methodologies 2
SCSD 664
(3)
Communication Sciences and Disorders 1
SCSD 666
(3)
Communication Sciences and Disorders 3
SCSD 667
(3)