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Faculty of Law
University Calendar 2004 - 2005


Welcome to McGill!

With over 300 areas of study offered by 21 faculties and professional schools, we are Canada's leading teaching and research-intensive university.

Our strength lies in the quality of our students, faculty and staff; the depth and variety of our research and academic programs; the collegiality of life on our campuses; our international reputation for excellence; the loyalty and generosity of our alumni and friends; the beauty of our two campuses; and the dedication and support of our staff. We strive to create an atmosphere that challenges and inspires our outstanding students and faculty from all over the world to achieve their very best. We are committed to growing our strength in each of the core areas while enhancing our support for students and faculty.

We welcome you to join the McGill community during a period of unprecedented growth and renewal. We have begun our most ambitious building program in 100 years. All over our downtown campus new buildings are going up that directly benefit students, including the Trottier Building for engineering and computer science, the new Music Building for both performance and research in music, media, and technology, the Bellini Life Sciences Building and 740 Dr. Penfield. Each boasts new cutting-edge facilities that strengthen McGill's place at the forefront of global innovation.

In addition to attracting extraordinarily bright and promising students, McGill is on a pathway to recruit at least 100 new faculty members per year over the next 10 years. The McGill name, reputation and opportunities are making this a reality.

We are committed to positioning ourselves - and you - for success and an enjoyable community and learning experience. Join us!

Heather Munroe-Blum

Principal and Vice-chancellor

The University reserves the right to make changes without prior notice
to the information contained in this publication, including the
alteration of various fees, schedules,
conditions of admission and credit requirements, and the
revision or cancellation of particular courses or programs.

Legal Deposit I 2004

Published August 2004

Photo:

Principal Heather Munroe-Blum congratulates Maryvon Coté on receiving his degree of Master of Library and Information

Studies in June 2003.



1 The Faculty

1.1 Location

Chancellor Day Hall
3644 Peel Street
Montreal, Quebec  H3A 1W9
Canada
Telephone: (514) 398-6666
Website: www.law.mcgill.ca
Faculty of Law Undergraduate Admissions
3644 Peel Street
Room 418, New Chancellor Day Hall
Montreal, Quebec  H3A 1W9
Telephone: (514) 398-6602
Email: undergradadmissions.law@mcgill.ca
Graduate Programmes in Law
McGill Faculty of Law
3661 Peel Street
Montreal, Quebec  H3A 1X1
Telephone: (514) 398-3544
Fax: (514) 398-8197
E-mail: gradadmissions.law@mcgill.ca

1.2 Faculty Administrative Officers

Nicholas Kasirer; B.A.(Tor.), B.C.L., LL.B.(McG.), D.E.A.(Paris), (James McGill Professor)
Dean
Catherine Walsh; B.A.(Dal.), LL.B.(New Br.), B.C.L.(Oxon)
Associate Dean (Academic)
Marie-Claude Prémont; B.Eng(Sher.), LL.L, Ph.D.(Laval)
Associate Dean (Graduate Studies and Research)
Rosalie Jukier; B.C.L., LL.B.(McG.), B.C.L.(Oxon)
Associate Dean (Strategic Planning)
Victoria Meikle; B.A., LL.B.(Tor.), LL.M.(McG.)
Assistant Dean (Admissions, Placement and Alumni Relations)
Véronique Bélanger; B.A.(Montr.), B.C.L., LL.B., LL.M.(McG.)
Assistant Dean (Student Affairs)
John Hobbins; B.A., M.L.S.(McG.)
Law Librarian

1.3 Faculty Administrative Staff

Marie-Hélène Dilauro
Faculty Administrator and Area Personnel Representative
Margaret Baratta
Administrative Officer
Graduate Programmes
Clelia Borrelli
Graduate Programmes, Administrative and Student Affairs Coordinator
Michael Cantwell
Development and Alumni Relations Officer
Manon Gariépy
Admissions Officer
Christine Gervais
Student Affairs Officer
Maria Marcheschi
Special Events and Alumni Relations Administrator
Brigitte St-Laurent
Director, Career Placement Office

1.4 Directors of Institutes

Institute of Air and Space Law
Paul S. Dempsey; A.B.J., J.D.(Georgia), LL.M.(George Washington), D.C.L.(McG.)
Director
Institute of Comparative Law
Fabien Gélinas; LL.B., LL.M.(Montr.), D.Phil.(Oxon.)
Director

1.5 Directors of Research Centres

Centre for Research in Air and Space Law
Paul S. Dempsey; A.B.J., J.D.(Georgia), LL.M.(George Washington), D.C.L.(McG.)
Director
Centre for Medicine, Ethics and Law
Margaret A. Somerville; A.M., F.R.C.S., A.u.A.(Pharm.) (Adelaide), LL.B.(Sydney), D.C.L.(McG.), LL.D. Hon. Causa (Windsor, Macquarie, St.F.X.) (Samuel Gale Professor of Law)
Acting Director
Centre of Private and Comparative Law
Jean-Guy Belley: LL.L., LL.M.(Laval), Doctorat en sociologie juridique(Paris 2) (Sir William C. Macdonald Professor of Law)
Director

1.6 Teaching Faculty

Wendy Adams; B.A.(Laur.), LL.B.(Tor.), LL.M.(Mich.)
Mark Antaki; B.C.L.,LL.B.(McG.),M.A.(Calif.)
Frédéric Bachand; LL.B.(Montr.), LL.M.(Cantab)
G. Blaine Baker; B.A., LL.B.(W.Ont.), LL.M.(Col.)
Jean-Guy Belley: LL.L., LL.M.(Laval), Doctorat en sociologie juridique(Paris 2) (Sir William C. Macdonald Professor of Law)
Adelle Blackett; B.A.(Queen's), LL.B., B.C.L.(McG.), LL.M.(Col.)
Angela Campbell; B.A., B.C.L., LL.B.(McG.), LL.M.(Harv.)
Madeleine Cantin Cumyn; B.A., LL.L.(Laval)
Irwin Cotler; O.C., B.A., B.C.L.(McG.), LL.M.(Yale), Ph.D.(Hebrew University), LL.D. Hon. Causa (Bar-Ilan, York, Simon Fraser, Haifa)
Paul-André Crépeau; C.C., O.Q., Q.C., B.A., L.Ph.(Ott.), LL.L.(Montr.), B.C.L.(Oxon), Docteur de l'Université de Paris(Droit), LL.D.(h.c.)(Ott., York, Dalhousie, Strasbourg, Montréal, Paris II (Panthéon-Assas), F.R.S.C.; Emeritus Professor
Armand de Mestral; A.B.(Harv.), B.C.L.(McG.), LL.M.(Harv.), Doctorat Hon. Causa(Université Lyon III, Kwansei Gakuin University)
Paul S. Dempsey; A.B.J., J.D.(Georgia), LL.M.(George Washington), D.C.L.(McG.)
Jaye Ellis; B.A.(Calg.); LL.B., B.C.L.(McG.), LL.M.(Br.Col.), D.C.L.(McG.)
William F. Foster; LL.B.(Hons.)(Auck.), LL.M.(Br.Col) (Sir William C. Macdonald Professor of Law) (on leave)
Fabien Gélinas; LL.B., LL.M.(Montr.), D.Phil.(Oxon.)
H. Patrick Glenn; B.A.(Br.Col.), LL.B.(Queen's), LL.M.(Harv.), D.E.S., Docteur en droit(Strasbourg), F.R.S.C. (Peter M. Laing Professor of Law )
Jane Matthews Glenn; B.A.(Hons), LL.B.(Queen's), Docteur de l'Université de Strasbourg(Droit)
Richard Gold; S.J.D., LL.M.(Michigan), LL.B.(Hons)(Tor.), B.Sc.(McG.)
Patrick Healy; B.A.(Vict.), B.C.L.(McG.), LL.M.(Tor.)
Ram Jakhu; B.A., LL.B., LL.M.(Panjab), LL.M., D.C.L.(McG.)
Richard A. Janda; B.A.(Tor.), LL.B., B.C.L.(McG.), LL.M.(Col.)
Pierre-Gabriel Jobin; B.A., B.Ph., LL.L.(Laval), Dipl. d'ét. sup. en dr. pr., Docteur en droit(Montpellier) (on leave)
Rosalie Jukier; B.C.L., LL.B.(McG.), B.C.L.(Oxon)
Daniel Jutras; LL.B.(Montr.), LL.M.(Harv.) (on leave)
Nicholas Kasirer; B.A.(Tor.), B.C.L., LL.B.(McG.), D.E.A.(Paris), (James McGill Professor)
Lara Khoury; LL.B.(Shea.), B.C.L., D.Phil.(Oxon)
Dennis R. Klinck; B.A., M.A.(Alta.), Ph.D.(Lon.), LL.B.(Sask.) (on leave)
David Lametti; B.A.(Tor.), LL.B., B.C.L.(McG.), LL.M.(Yale), D.Phil.(Oxon) (on leave)
Roderick A. Macdonald; B.A., LL.B.(York), LL.L.(Ott.), LL.M.(Tor.) (F.R. Scott Professor of Public and Constitutional Law), F.R.S.C.
Desmond Manderson; B.A.(Hons.), LL.B.(Hons.)(A.N.U.), D.C.L.(McG.) (Canada Research Chair)
Michael Milde; LL.M., Ph.D.(Charles), Dip. Air and Space Law(McG.)
Marie-Claude Prémont; B.Eng(Sher.), LL.L, Ph.D.(Laval)
René Provost; LL.B.(Montr.), LL.M.(Berkeley), D.Phil.(Oxon)
Geneviève Saumier; B.Com, B.C.L., LL.B.(McG.), Ph.D.(Cantab.) (on leave)
Stephen A. Scott; B.A., B.C.L.(McG.), D.Phil.(Oxon); Emeritus Professor
Colleen Sheppard; B.A., LL.B.(Tor.), LL.M.(Harv.)
Ronald B. Sklar; B.S.(N.Y.U.), LL.B.(Brooklyn), LL.M. (Northwestern), LL.M.(Yale)
Lionel Smith; B.Sc.(Tor.), LL.B.(W.Ont.), LL.M.(Cantab.), D.Phil.(Oxon) (James McGill Professor) (on leave)
Stephen A. Smith; B.A.(Queen's), LL.B.(Tor.) D.Phil.(Oxon) (Dawson Scholar) (on leave)
Margaret A. Somerville; A.M., F.R.C.S., A.u.A.(Pharm.) (Adelaide), LL.B.(Sydney), D.C.L.(McG.), LL.D. Hon. Causa (Windsor, Macquarie, St.F.X.) (Samuel Gale Professor of Law)
William Tetley; C.M., Q.C., B.A.(McG.), LL.L.(Laval)
Stephen Toope; A.B.(Harv.), B.C.L., LL.B.(McG.), Ph.D.(Cantab.) (on leave)
Shauna Van Praagh; B.Sc., LL.B.(Tor.), LL.M.(Col.), J.D.S.(Col.)
Ivan A. Vlasic; B.C.L.(Zag.), LL.M.(McG.), LL.M., J.S.D.(Yale); Emeritus Professor
Catherine Walsh; B.A.(Dal.), LL.B.(New Br.), B.C.L.(Oxon)
Adjunct Professors
Kenneth Atlas; B.C.L., LL.B.(McG.)
Donald Bunker; B.A.(S.G.W.), B.C.L., LL.M., D.C.L.(McG.)
Pierre Deschamps; L.Sc.R., B.C.L.(McG.)
Robert Godin; B.C.L.(McG.), B.A.(Sir G.Wms.) (Wainwright Fellow)
Sunny Handa; B.Com.(McG.), LL.B.(Tor.), LL.M., D.C.L.(McG.)
Andrew Harakas; B.A.(Michigan), LL.B.(Juris Doctor)(Michigan State), LL.M., Air and Space Law(McG.)
Stéphane Lessard; LL.L.(Montr.), LL.M.(McG.), LL.B.(Ott.), M.B.A.(W.Ont.)
Rod Margo; LL.M.(McG.), Ph.D.(London)
Peter Nesgos; D.C.L.(McG.)
John Saba; B.A., M.A., LL.B., LL.M., D.C.L.(McG.)
Francis P. Schubert; B.C.L., D.E.S. Rel. intern., Ph.D. Law(U. Geneva)
Peter Van Fenema; LL.M.(McG.)
Ludof W. Van Hasselt; Ph.D.iur(Leyden)
Ludwig Weber; Lic iur, Dr. Jur(Heidelberg), LL.M.(McG.)
James Woods; B.A., B.C.L., LL.B.(McG)

1.7 Law Library Staff

John Hobbins; B.A., M.L.S.(McG.)
Law Librarian
Louise Robertson; B.A., M.L.S.(McG.)
Associate Law Librarian
Daniel Boyer; B.A.(McG.), LL.B.(UQAM), M.L.I.S.(McG.)
Wainwright Civil Law Librarian
TBA
Instruction and Information Librarian

2 The Faculty of Law at McGill

2.1 History of the Faculty of Law to 1968

In the spring of 1848 a group of 23 students reading law for the Bar of Quebec petitioned McGill College to grant them formal instruction leading to a degree in law. In their petition they pledged to attend the courses offered by William Badgley, a prominent Montreal advocate and circuit judge, who had since 1844 been giving occasional lectures in law within the Faculty of Arts. In consequence of this request the Board of Governors of McGill formally established a programme of instruction in law on July 15, 1848.

In 1852 the Governors determined to establish a separate Faculty of Law, and when the new Faculty was formally constituted in 1853, William Badgley was appointed Dean.

Until the early 20th century McGill remained predominantly a Civil Law faculty, preparing students for the practising profession in Quebec. Throughout this period her faculty and graduates contributed enormously to scholarship in the Civil Law. A particular loyalty to the Civil Law and the Civil Code can be traced as far back as McGill's first chancellor and fourth principal, Charles Dewey Day, who was a member of the three-man Commission which drafted the first Civil Code promulgated in 1866.

This excellence in the Civil Law has continued with scholars such as Eugène Lafleur, William de M. Marler, Arnold Wainwright and Louis Baudouin. More recently, McGill has been a focal point for the Revision of the Civil Code.

While the Civil Law has always been preeminent at McGill, as early as 1915 the Faculty began to develop the concept of a national legal education with the appointment of Robert W. Lee of Oxford as Dean. By 1920 the Faculty was offering a three-year B.C.L. Programme, a three-year LL.B. Programme, and a four-year B.C.L./LL.B. Programme for those who wished to practice in another jurisdiction or pursue a career in law teaching. Unfortunately, local pressure led to the abandoning of the National Programme in 1924. In the late 1920s Percy Elwood Corbett was recruited to the Faculty, and the latter was the initiator of McGill's second great academic strength, International, Constitutional and Human Rights Law.

In 1928 the Faculty engaged Francis Reginald Scott. Over the next 58 years at McGill, F.R. Scott established a reputation as an outstanding constitutional lawyer and civil libertarian. This international and human rights law profile was further enhanced when Corbett persuaded John Humphrey to join the Faculty in 1936. After a decade of teaching International Law, Humphrey left McGill in 1946 to become first Director of the Division of Human Rights in the United Nations Secretariat. He returned to McGill in 1966 where he continued to teach in Human Rights until his death in 1995.

The Faculty in 1946 engaged yet another professor who was to become a leading international lawyer, Maxwell Cohen. Cohen played a leading role in two further initiatives, which reflect McGill's third great academic strength, the establishment of the Institute of Foreign and Comparative Law in 1966, and the re-establishment of the National Programme of Legal Education in 1968.

Further details of the Faculty's history may be found in Ian C. Pilarczyk, "A Noble Roster": 150 Years of Law at McGill (1999) (www.law.mcgill.ca/alumni/noble_roster-en.htm); S.B. Frost and D.L. Johnston, "Law at McGill: Past, Present and Future" (1981), 27 McGill L.J./Rev. dr. de McGill 33; and in S.B. Frost, "The Early Days of Law Teaching at McGill" (1984), 9 Dal. L.J. 150.

2.2 The National Programme since 1968 and the Faculty's New Curriculum

For over 150 years the Faculty has endeavoured to provide a liberal education in law and jurisprudence suitable as a first training for the practice of law. Since 1968, the Faculty has offered a national professional training which qualifies students to proceed to the legal professions not only in Quebec, but also in all other Canadian jurisdictions. The curriculum, while remaining within the Faculty's control, reflects the expectations of the professional corporations. It is constantly under review in order to respond to the present and future needs of legal professionals in Canada, as well as the requirements of those intending to pursue careers in the public and private sectors in which legal training is an asset rather than a formal qualification.

At McGill the study of law is more than a professional training. It has long been acknowledged in the great universities of Europe and North America that the scientific, liberal and independent study of law must have a place as an academic discipline. This means that the university is recognized as an appropriate forum to examine the law as an element of social organization, from critical, historical and comparative perspectives. Scholarship in the law is, in this sense, as essential an element in the life of the Faculty as its role in the training of professionals. Indeed, the two functions are inseparable.

McGill occupies a unique position among Canadian law faculties to pursue its dual mission of educating future professionals and promoting scholarship. The Faculty, quite naturally in the light of its location, has a long tradition of teaching and scholarship in both the English and the French languages. The staff and students have always been drawn from these two linguistic groups. While English has been the primary language of the Faculty, the use of French in the classroom and as a language in daily life is firmly entrenched. Wilfrid Laurier's valedictory address of 1864 was delivered in his mother tongue.

McGill has also long been a meeting ground for Canada's legal traditions, the civil law deriving from the law of France and more remotely from Roman Law, and the English common law. The Faculty's early curriculum vividly demonstrated the richness of the Quebec and indeed the Canadian legal heritage when it laid down for study in the 1850s and 1860s, the Institutes of Justinian, the dominant law of pre-Napoleonic France in the form of the Coutume de Paris and that monument of late eighteenth century English law, the Commentaries of William Blackstone.

The Faculty believes that its programme, within which students earn both a B.C.L. and an LL.B. degree, creates an important link between the civil and common law systems as they obtain in Canada. Graduates acquire a number of important advantages. First, the programme enables all students to examine, critically, the foundations of both Canadian legal systems. This study contributes significantly to the advancement of legal theory and jurisprudence. Second, graduates may proceed to the Bars of all the Canadian provinces as well as those of a number of jurisdictions in the United States and elsewhere. Third, the inter-dependence of the modern world means that many legal problems transcend individual legal systems. A knowledge of both the civil law and the common law is therefore an asset. Finally, the comparative and trans-systemic dimension of McGill's programme is useful in foreign service, government work, international practice, and law reform, whether in Quebec or other provinces.

McGill's programme engages its students and professorial staff in the study of law not only as a means for achieving desirable social objectives, but also as an end in itself. The Faculty is confident that its graduates, who are awarded B.C.L. and LL.B. degrees simultaneously, will continue to make special contributions to Canadian public and intellectual life through careers that take many paths, not limited to any particular province or region or to the practice of law.

Since the academic year 1999-2000, students obtain both a civil law (B.C.L.) and common law (LL.B.) degree after completing 105 credits taken over three or four years. Concepts from the two legal systems are presented through an innovative, integrated methodology that fosters critical analysis. Students may also add to their basic law programme by completing a minor, major concentration or Honours programme. Joint degrees in management or social work are also possible, and students have opportunities to take part of their legal education abroad.

The New McGill Curriculum

In 1998, the Faculty adopted a creative and challenging new approach to legal education that prepares McGill graduates for careers that increasingly require knowledge of more than one legal system. From the very first year, students are introduced to civil law and common law concepts and encouraged to compare and critically evaluate the two traditions. This dramatic and unique curriculum, which explores the common law and the civil law in an integrated fashion, is entirely different from the "three-plus-one" programmes offered by other faculties. McGill's trans-systemic method fosters not only outstanding analytical ability, but also critical reflection and openness to diverse approaches to legal problems.

The structure of the new programme ensures that students are well grounded in the fundamental legal concepts of the civil law and the common law, in courses specific to each tradition. The comparative dimension of McGill's curriculum focuses primarily upon the law of obligations (contracts and tort or delict) in which remarkable changes are taking place globally involving complex legal transactions across national borders.

The Faculty emphasizes the mastery of underlying principles in private and public law, with a wealth of courses in legal theory, social analysis, and legal pluralism. McGill's proud tradition of public law teaching and scholarship is also reflected in the wide range of courses offered in Canadian constitutional and administrative law, as well as in international law, where McGill's offerings are unsurpassed.

To complement these basic courses, the Faculty offers, through the Institute of Comparative Law, a number of advanced courses in comparative private law. The trans-systemic character of the programme is also reflected in the teaching of federal courses. In the public as well as corporate and mercantile law fields, courses are taught with both private law traditions in view.

The Faculty's first National Programme is described in R.W. Lee, "Legal Education Old and New" (1916), 36 Can. Law Times 24 at page 115. For a detailed discussion of the National Programme from 1968-1998, see J.E.C. Brierley, "Developments in Legal Education at McGill, 1970-1980" (1982), 7 Dal. L.J. 364. A monograph-length article on the National Programme by R.A. Macdonald appeared under the title "The National Law Programme at McGill: Origins, Establishment, Prospects" in (1990), 13 Dal. L.J. 211. On the new McGill Programme, see
Y.-M. Morrissette, "McGill's Integrated Civil and Common Law Program" in [2002] J. of Legal Education 12.

2.3 Legal Education at McGill Today

Since 1951 the Faculty has been located in the J.K.L. Ross mansion, a gift to the University of the late J.W. McConnell. The main law complex comprises this fine 19th century mansion, known as Old Chancellor Day Hall, and a six-story building erected in 1966-67 containing classrooms and formerly home of the Law library (financed in large part through the gifts of graduates and other friends of the Faculty). The Nahum Gelber Law Library opened its doors in September 1998. This state-of-the-art facility was funded entirely by donations from Law students, graduates and friends of the Faculty. Two other fine old mansions fronting on Peel Street house the students and staff of the graduate programmes and the personnel of two institutes and four research centres: the Institute and Centre of Air and Space Law; the Institute of Comparative Law; the Centre of Private and Comparative Law; the Centre for Medicine, Ethics and Law; the Centre for the Study of Regulated Industries, and the Centre for Intellectual Property and Policy.

As an integral part of a great University the Faculty of Law is deeply committed to the two ideals of the University: teaching and scholarship. Throughout its history McGill has recruited its professors and drawn its students from a wide variety of countries. Today the Faculty counts professors who obtained their initial legal training in several different Canadian provinces. It also boasts professors from the United States, Austria, the Czech Republic, Australia and New Zealand. All contribute to the unique scholarly environment of McGill. Similarly, the over 500 undergraduate students are drawn from all 10 Canadian provinces, several states in the United States and a variety of other countries. What is more, graduates of McGill today pursue their careers around the world.

In recognition of this international dimension of its staff and students, McGill offers two undergraduate degrees pursued simultaneously in a joint programme: the B.C.L. (Bachelor of Civil Law) enabling students to seek admission to one of the legal professions in Quebec or to gain a familiarity with the private law systems of continental Europe, and the LL.B. (Bachelor of Laws) enabling students to seek admission to the legal profession in other Canadian provinces, in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

Studying Canadian law under McGill's programme is a unique academic experience. It requires mastery of the private and public law systems of Canada's several jurisdictions, as well as the ability to situate analytical understanding of legal rules in a broader intellectual and social context. The Faculty thus believes that disciplines such as history, social theory, economics, political science and philosophy offer perspectives which inform the study of law.

McGill's courses reflect these broader themes in the history and philosophy of law. All students enrol in the first-year course Foundations for an initial exposure to these themes. Later, students may elect from a number of perspectives courses, in which law is studied in its social setting. For this reason, the requirement that all students in the Faculty take a significant number of credits offered within each of the two private law disciplines of the Faculty - the civil law and the common law - is thought to be fundamental to the nature of legal education pursued at McGill.

McGill insists upon the highest standards of learning and scholarship. Many professors have contributed to a comprehensive treatise on Quebec private law; others have produced leading reference works in Corporation Law, Commercial Law, International Law, Maritime Law, Air and Space Law and Constitutional Law. Over the last five years, McGill has placed a considerable number of students as law clerks at the Supreme Court of Canada. Moreover, the Faculty counts today a significant number of professors who have served in the past as law clerks at the Supreme Court.

Excellence at McGill is reflected also in a commitment to offering students the opportunity to pursue elements of their legal education in both the English and French languages. The graduation of students expert in both the Civil Law and the Common Law and thoroughly immersed in the historical and philosophical foundations of law and legal ordering shared in the western legal tradition are ideals embraced by all in the Faculty. For a discussion of McGill's role in contemporary Canadian legal education see
J.E.C. Brierley, "Quebec Legal Education Since 1945. Cultural Paradoxes and Traditional Ambiguities" (1986), 10 Dal. L.J. 5.

3 Admission to Undergraduate Programmes

In September 1999, the Faculty of Law implemented a number of exciting and significant changes to its programmes and curriculum. The reforms affected the structure and content of all undergraduate law programmes, including the joint programmes (M.B.A./Law and Law/M.S.W.).

All correspondence and inquiries should be directed to:
Admissions Office
Faculty of Law
McGill University
3644 Peel Street
Room 418, New Chancellor Day Hall
Montreal, Quebec  H3A 1W9

Telephone: (514) 398-6602
Fax: (514) 398-8453
E-mail: undergradadmissions.law@mcgill.ca
Website: www.law.mcgill.ca

3.1 Admissions Policy and Process

3.1.1 Admissions Policy

Law at McGill is a limited enrolment programme and admission is very competitive. Recent experience shows that the number of applications is approximately seven times greater than the number of available places. Each year the Faculty admits approximately 170 new students. Successful applicants are chosen by the Faculty's Admissions Committee, based on academic records, linguistic abilities, personal statements, extra-curricular and community activities, as well as letters of reference.

The objective of the Faculty's admissions policy is to select those applicants best suited to studying law in McGill's uniquely comparative and bilingual environment. The Admissions Committee appraises the intellectual capacity of applicants, their curiosity about law, and attends to criteria such as social commitment, political insight, leadership skills, ability to work in teams, maturity, and potential for growth through opportunity or adversity. In addition, applicants must have substantial reading ability in, and aural comprehension of, both English and French. The Committee seeks to achieve a socially diverse learning community drawn from across Canada and beyond, in which there is a balance of women and men and of English and French speakers, as well as representation of a diversity of career aspirations, backgrounds and life experiences.

3.1.2 Admissions Process

Applications are sent to the Admissions Committee on the basis of the dates they are received, and completed, and the strength of the academic record. The Committee is composed of members of the Faculty of Law as well as two or three graduating students. Competitive applications are reviewed by two or three members of the Admissions Committee. Committee members carefully review all documents submitted, and evaluate the candidacy on the admissions criteria described above. Particular attention is paid to personal statements, résumés and letters of reference.

Representatives of the Admissions Committee interview applicants in the CEGEP and mature applicant categories who are regarded as potentially admissible following a review of their file. The Committee may request that other applicants attend an interview. Interviews take place in Montreal or, if travel to Montreal is not possible, by telephone.

The official decision of the Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Law is contained in a letter from the Assistant Dean (Admissions, Placement and Alumni Relations) that is mailed to the candidate when the decision is made. Decisions of the Admissions Committee are also made available to candidates on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva-students/applicants. Decisions on individual applications cannot be disclosed over the phone. Although every effort is made to inform candidates of the decision of the Admissions Committee at the earliest possible date, the process is very labour intensive and extends into June. Final decisions about applicants who have been placed on the wait list may not be made before July or August.

3.2 Programmes

3.2.1 The McGill Programme

The Faculty of Law offers a unique integrated programme, which leads to graduation with both civil law and common law degrees (B.C.L./LL.B.). While the curriculum is described in detail in section 4.1 "The McGill Programme", a brief overview is provided below.

Students are introduced to "trans-systemic" teaching in the first year of the programme, where fundamental concepts of the civil law and common law systems are examined within a single course. This unique method of instruction fosters outstanding analytical ability, critical reflection and openness to diverse approaches to legal problems. McGill's programme requires students to complete 105 credits. The majority of students take three and a half to four years to complete the B.C.L./LL.B. programme. It is possible, however, to complete the programme in three years, either by doing work for credit over the summer or by carrying a heavy course load in second and third years.

3.2.2 Advanced Undergraduate Programmes

The Integrated B.C.L./LL.B. programme is enhanced by three options to broaden perspectives and expertise: the Honours option, the Majors option and the Minors option. Each of these options entails additional credits, rounding out the programme to a full four years. In each case, the completed advanced programme forms part of the degree designation at graduation.

3.2.3 M.B.A./Law Programme

A joint M.B.A./B.C.L./LL.B. programme is offered by the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Management.

Applicants wishing to pursue the joint programme must make separate concurrent applications to, and be admitted by, both the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Management. Admission to the Faculty of Law is made on the same criteria as if the applicant were applying only into the Law programme. Admission to the Faculty of Management depends, among other things, on the student's performance on the GMAT. For further information about the M.B.A. programme, please contact the Faculty of Management. Please note that students must have completed an undergraduate degree and have one year of employment experience following graduation from their undergraduate degree in order to be admissible to the M.B.A. programme. Candidates applying into the joint M.B.A./Law programme should indicate in their personal statement their reasons for doing so.

Students in the joint M.B.A./Law programme will do their first year in the M.B.A. programme. The following year, their first year of Law. The programme requires the completion of a total of 141 credits. Students who successfully complete the programme will receive, usually after four and one-half years, a B.C.L., an LL.B. and an M.B.A.

Students registered in the first year of the M.B.A. programme at McGill University are eligible to apply to the Faculty of Law in order to be admitted to the joint M.B.A./Law programme.

3.2.4 Law/M.S.W. Programme

McGill's Faculty of Law and School of Social Work offer a joint programme enabling students to obtain both civil law and common law degrees, and a Master's degree in Social Work.

Applicants to the joint B.C.L./LL.B./M.S.W. programme must make separate concurrent applications to the School of Social Work and the Faculty of Law. Acceptance into the joint programme is dependent on the applicant being admitted to both the School of Social Work for the M.S.W. and the Faculty of Law for the B.C.L./LL.B. Admission to the Faculty of Law is made on the same criteria as if the applicant were applying only into the Law programme. Please note that candidates must hold a Bachelor's degree in Social Work in order to be eligible for admission to the M.S.W. programme. Candidates applying into the joint Law/ M.S.W. programme should indicate in their personal statement their reasons for doing so.

Candidates who hold an undergraduate degree in a discipline other than Social Work may be eligible to undertake a Special B.S.W., which can be completed in 13 months. Please contact the School of Social Work for further details.

The joint Law/M.S.W. programme requires the completion of a total of 132 credits. Students who successfully complete the programme will receive, usually after four years, a B.C.L., an LL.B. and an M.S.W.

3.3 Eligibility

3.3.1 Educational Requirements

Candidates must have a minimum of two years of university studies (60 credits), or a diploma of collegial studies (DCS) from a Quebec College of General and Professional Education (CEGEP), at the time of registration. Students holding a French Baccalaureate are also eligible to apply. Although candidates who have completed 60 credits of university study are eligible to apply to the Faculty of Law, the strength of the pool is such that almost all students admitted in the 'university' category have completed an undergraduate degree. Candidates admitted directly from CEGEP or a French Baccalaureate should be aware that Bar Admission requirements in some Canadian provinces and a number of states include studies at the university level - prior to commencing studies in law.

3.3.2 Language Requirements

McGill's integrated programme is unique in Canada because of its comparative and bilingual character. All candidates must have substantial reading ability in, and aural comprehension of, both English and French. Since both English and French material will be assigned in first-year courses, students must be able to read complex texts in both languages from the outset of their studies. First-year courses are offered in both English and French. A number of upper-year courses are offered in one language only. While examination questions are set in the language in which a course is given, any examination may contain extensive materials in either French or English. The Faculty's policy of passive bilingualism permits students to submit written material, write exams and ask questions in class in either English or French regardless of the language of instruction. Students may also fulfil their Moot Court requirements in either English or French.

Candidates intending to proceed to the Bar of Quebec or the Board of Notaries of Quebec should carefully review section 14.1.1 "Language Requirements - Quebec". The Charter of the French Language imposes certain mandatory language requirements upon those seeking to practise the profession of Advocate or Notary in Quebec.

3.4 Categories of Applicants

3.4.1 Aboriginal Applicants

Canadian Aboriginal persons are encouraged to apply to the Faculty of Law. An Aboriginal person of registered status is entitled to financial assistance from the federal government for three years of law study at McGill.

Aboriginal applicants who wish to enrol in a summer pre-law programme may do so in the Program of Legal Studies for Native People, offered at the College of Law of the University of Saskatchewan, or in Le programme pré-droit, given by the University of Ottawa.

Further information concerning the Program of Legal Studies for Native People may be obtained by writing to:

The Director
Native Law Centre
University of Saskatchewan
101 Diefenbaker Place
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan  S7N 5B8

Information regarding Le programme pré-droit at the University of Ottawa can be obtained by writing to:

Prof. Jean-Paul Lacasse
University of Ottawa
Faculty of Law
Civil Law Section
57 Louis Pasteur
Ottawa, Ontario  K1N 6N5
3.4.2 Mature Applicants

Candidates who qualify as mature are encouraged to apply in this category. There is no pre-determined limit on the number of mature candidates admitted in any year. Mature students are defined as over 30 years of age at time of registration or as having interrupted their formal education for a minimum of five years. Mature applicants are normally expected to have completed CEGEP or two years of undergraduate study.

Mature applicants are required to submit a detailed résumé of their non-academic experience along with letters of assessment from persons who are familiar with their academic potential. The Admissions Committee is particularly interested in gathering information concerning the applicant's ability to meet the demands of law studies, to reason and analyze, and to express him- or herself well both orally and in writing.

Mature applicants are required to attend an interview with the Admissions Committee.

3.4.3 Applicants Wishing to Pursue Part-time Studies

A candidate may seek permission to pursue studies on a part-time basis, either at the time of admission or while in course. Permission may be granted for the duration of studies, or for a limited period. The student must establish to the satisfaction of the Admissions Committee, if the request is made before admission, or of the Associate Dean (Academic), if made subsequently, that full-time study is impracticable for any of the following reasons.

i) pregnancy;
ii) health problems, physical disabilities;
iii) responsibility for the primary care of others;
iv) financial hardship;
v) other special circumstances.

Applicants seeking admission to study on a part-time basis must submit a separate letter giving the reasons why they wish to study part-time. Applications for part-time study are evaluated on the same basis as those for full-time study.

Students granted permission to register on a part-time basis must register for a minimum of nine credits per term, and complete all the requirements of the B.C.L./LL.B. programme within six academic years.

Candidates seeking admission on a part-time basis must fulfil all the ordinary entrance requirements of the Faculty of Law.

3.4.4 Transfer Students

Students who have successfully completed at least one full year of studies in an undergraduate programme at another Canadian Law Faculty may apply for admission as a transfer student. There are, however, a limited number of places available for transfer students. Applications are evaluated on the same criteria as applications to the first year of the B.C.L./LL.B. programme, with particular attention to performance in law studies.

Successful applicants are required to complete a minimum of 75 credits at McGill. The Associate Dean (Academic) determines credit for previous studies. In most cases, transfer students will be required to take the trans-systemic first-year courses Contractual Obligations and Extra-Contractual Obligations/Torts in order to meet degree requirements at McGill. Candidates will not receive credit for courses in obligations, contract or tort taken during a first year completed at another faculty. Students who are not in good standing or who have been required to withdraw at the end of their first year at another Canadian law faculty are not eligible to transfer to McGill.

3.4.5 Advanced-Standing Students

Applicants who hold a law degree from a Canadian or foreign university recognized by McGill may apply for admission to the B.C.L./LL.B. programme with advanced standing. There are, however, a limited number of places available for advanced-standing applicants. Applications are evaluated on the same criteria as applications to the first year of the B.C.L./LL.B. programme, with particular attention to performance in law studies.

Successful applicants are required to complete a minimum of 75 credits at McGill and follow the integrated B.C.L./LL.B. programme. It is not possible to obtain either the B.C.L. or the LL.B. degree on its own. The Associate Dean (Academic) determines equivalences for previous studies.

3.4.6 Visiting Students (Letters of Permission)

Students who have completed two years of studies at another law faculty who wish, for academic or personal reasons, to spend a term or a year at McGill may be admitted as Visiting Students. In order to be admitted as a Visiting Student, candidates should have completed at least two years of study at another law school and obtained a letter of permission from their home university. The Faculty endeavours to accommodate qualified students who are in good standing in their own faculties, where student numbers at McGill permit. Students from other law faculties seeking admission to McGill as Visiting Students must apply through the Admissions Office. Decisions on applications by Visiting Students are made by the Assistant Dean (Student Affairs). Upon acceptance, the student must arrange an academic programme with the Associate Dean (Academic). Courses taken by Visiting Students cannot be credited toward a McGill Law degree.

3.4.7 Special Students
The Faculty permits a limited number of applicants not actively pursuing a law degree to register as Special Students. Students registered in other universities, and candidates not actively pursuing a university degree can apply on this basis to take certain courses within the Faculty. Permission to do so will only be granted to applicants who satisfy the Faculty of their capacity to undertake the study of law, and where sufficient course space is available. Candidates who have been refused admission to degree programmes or who plan to seek admission to the Faculty of Law at McGill as regular students are not eligible for admission as Special Students.
Students registered in another faculty at McGill, who, for exceptional reasons related to their programme of study, wish to enroll in a course given in the Faculty of Law, must obtain the permission of the Associate Dean (Academic) and of the Professor giving the course.
Note 1:
Courses taken by Special Students cannot be credited toward a McGill law degree. Special students are limited to a maximum of 12 credits per year, 6 per term.
Note 2:
The Faculty will not consider applications as "special students" from candidates seeking to fulfil the requirements of the National Committee on Accreditation.
3.4.8 Comité des équivalences
The Faculty will consider applications from candidates seeking to fulfil the requirements of either the Comité des équivalences of the Barreau du Québec or of the Chambre des notaires, in order to practice in Québec. Successful applicants must have the final decision of the Comité des équivalences or the Chambre des notaires in hand prior to registration at McGill.

3.5 Admissions Procedure

Unless they do not have access to the Web, candidates must apply to the B.C.L./LL.B. programme online. The online application is accessible through the Faculty of Law website, at www.law.mcgill.ca. The Web application will be available as of the beginning of September. In order to avoid processing delays, candidates should carefully read instructions contained in the help sections of the online application. Please contact the Admissions Office at the Faculty of Law if you cannot apply on line.

Candidates will receive an acknowledgment form indicating their McGill identification Number (ID) and Personal Identification Number (PIN). Candidates must check the status of their application on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva-students/applicants. Applicants who have not received an acknowledgment within a reasonable period of time (four weeks for applicants within Canada), or who do not have access to the Web, are asked to contact the Admissions Office at the Faculty of Law.

The elements of the Application Package are described below. Other than transcripts, all documents must be provided to the Admissions Office by the deadline indicated in section 3.6 "Application Deadlines". In addition, candidates must submit requisite supporting documents to the Admissions Office of the Faculty of Law either by mail or over the counter. We regret that we cannot accept requisite supporting documents by fax or e-mail.

3.5.1 Application Fee

A non-refundable application fee of $60 in Canadian funds is required to complete an application to the B.C.L./LL.B. programme. A credit card is required to complete the online application form. Visa or MasterCard is accepted. If you cannot pay by credit card please contact the Admissions Office at the Faculty of Law. Fee waivers may be available to those who establish, with documentary evidence, that their financial situation is significantly more precarious than that of most applicants.

3.5.2 Language Skills

All applicants to the Faculty of Law must have substantial reading ability in, and aural comprehension of, both English and French. Applicants are asked to indicate how they became proficient in their second language. A language self-test is available on the Web site at www.law.mcgill.ca/undergraduate. Look under Admissions > Requirements.

3.5.3 Personal Statement

Applicants are asked to prepare a brief essay (two pages, signed) explaining why they are interested in studying law, why at McGill in particular, and how they might contribute to the life of the Faculty. This essay is extremely important, as it enables Committee members to develop a fuller understanding of the candidate.

The Committee seeks to appraise an applicant's intellectual curiosity, social commitment, political insight, leadership skills, ability to work in teams, maturity and potential for growth through opportunity or adversity. Candidates are invited to discuss any information about themselves that might assist the Committee in this task. For example, applicants may want to describe their experience as a member of a minority group, or factors which may have made access to a university education difficult. The Faculty seeks to achieve a socially diverse learning community made up of a balance of women and men, English and French speakers, as well as representing different career aspirations, backgrounds, life experiences and geographic origins.

Serious medical or personal difficulties may have had an impact on an applicant's academic performance. If this is the case, the applicant should make reference to these difficulties in his or her personal statement, and provide supporting documentation as appropriate.

3.5.4 Resumé

Applicants are asked to provide their resumé. It should highlight the applicant's academic background and achievements, work experience, volunteer and extra-curricular activities, and other significant interests. If a candidate has worked during the school term, the number of hours worked per week should be indicated on their résumé. Candidates need not limit the résumé to one page.

3.5.5 Official Transcripts

Applicants must ensure that official transcripts for all university studies completed to date and to be completed in the current academic year are forwarded to the Faculty of Law Admissions Office, or submit official transcripts in an envelope sealed by the Office of the Registrar where they were issued. Please note that candidates must submit official transcripts or certified true copies of results obtained in any studies carried out while on exchange unless the marks, as well as the credits, obtained in courses taken on exchange are included on transcripts issued by their home university.

Transcripts in a language other than English or French must be accompanied by an English or French translation provided either by the school issuing the transcript or by a certified translator. Applicants who are currently, or have been, enrolled at a CEGEP must indicate their Permanent Code in their application and submit a student copy of their results, showing marks up to and including the most recent semester completed. McGill will obtain an official transcript electronically from the Quebec Ministry of Education.

McGill University transcripts need not be requested by applicants as the Admissions Office will obtain them directly from the Office of the University Registrar. Please note that the Faculty of Law at McGill does not receive transcripts through LSDAS.

Transfer students should forward the transcript of their winter-term results as soon as they become available. Applications to transfer cannot be considered without these results.

3.5.6 Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

The LSAT is not required for admission to the Faculty of Law at McGill. However, if an applicant has taken or will be taking the LSAT, the score obtained will be reviewed by the Admission Committee as part of its evaluation of a candidacy. Applicants who have taken or will be taking the LSAT exam are required to report the date(s) of sitting(s) and supply their LSAT Identification Number (L + eight digits) in the appropriate places in the Tests Taken section of the Web-based electronic application. Please note that applicants are not required to provide the Faculty of Law with a copy of their score as the Admissions Office accesses this information directly. Failure to supply the information required to obtain an LSAT score will adversely affect chances of admission.

Note:

Candidates are strongly encouraged to write the LSAT by December of the year prior to the year for which they seek admission. Candidates who register for the February LSAT risk that, by the time the Committee reviews their application, there will no longer be a place to offer even if the Committee wishes to admit. Please remember, applications are sent to the Admissions Committee on the basis of the dates they are received and completed.

3.5.7 Letters of Recommendation

Applicants are asked to forward two letters of recommendation to the Faculty of Law Admissions Office. Please note that while two letters of reference are required, the file of a candidate who indicates three referees will be considered incomplete until all three letters of reference have been submitted to the Admissions Office. Where an applicant is currently a student, the references should be from current or recent professors or teachers. Where the applicant is not a student, the references should be from persons familiar with the applicant and able to judge the applicant's academic capacity. Academic references are generally given more weight than professional references. Personal references are not helpful.

Letters of reference should be on institutional letterhead whenever possible. Individuals providing references should sign the letter, enclose it in an envelope, seal the flap of the envelope, and sign their name across the flap. The referee should then return the envelope to the applicant. This procedure allows the Admissions Office to ensure that the letter has proceeded directly from the referee to the Admissions Office. If necessary, referees may forward letters directly to the Admissions Office. They should ensure that letters reach the Admissions Office before the application deadline or as soon thereafter as possible. The Law Reference Letter Instruction Form is available on the website of the Faculty of Law at www.law.mcgill.ca/undergraduate. The Admissions Office regrets that it cannot accept references by fax, by e-mail or by telephone.

3.6 Application Deadlines

Admissions to the Faculty of Law are made on a rolling basis. The on-line application is available as of the beginning of September and the Admissions Committee starts reviewing completed applications from university and mature applicants as soon as possible after November 1st. Applicants in these categories are strongly encouraged to apply by November 1st, or as soon thereafter as possible, as we often do not have room in the class to make offers to all of the candidates we would like to admit. Documents must be postmarked or delivered on or before the dates listed below. The applicant should ensure that supporting documents reach the Faulty of Law Admissions Office as soon as possible. Missing documentation slows the admissions process since incomplete applications cannot be circulated to the Admissions Committee.

3.6.1 Applications for Admission to First Year

The final deadline for application for university, mature and advanced-standing candidates is January 15. Applicants currently completing CEGEP or a French Baccalaureate, or who have completed less than a year of university studies since CEGEP must apply by March 1.

3.6.2 Other Applications

Visiting applicants must submit their applications no later than March 1 for September or January entry.

Transfer applicants must submit their applications no later than May 1.

Candidates seeking to fulfil the requirements of the Comité des Équivalences or the Chambre des Notaires must apply by May 1 for the fall term and by October 1 for the winter term.

Special Students must apply by August 1 for the fall term, and December 1 for the winter term.

4 Undergraduate Programmes of Study

4.1 The McGill Programme

The Faculty permits students to pursue an integrated programme of studies which qualifies them for the Bar Admission Programmes in all Canadian provinces. The Faculty grants concurrently both its degrees - Bachelor of Civil Law (B.C.L.) and Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) - to candidates who have successfully completed 105 credits as follows:

4.1.1 Curricular requirements for Degrees
1.  Required courses
LAWG 100D1/D2
Contractual Obligations
LAWG 101D1/D2
Extra-contractual Obligations/Torts
PRAC 147D1/D2
Introductory Legal Research
PRAC 155D1/D2
Legal Writing, Mooting and Advanced Legal Research
PROC 124
Judicial Institutions and Civil Procedure
PROC 200
Advanced Civil Law Obligations
PRV1 144D1/D2
Civil Law Property
PRV3 200
Advanced Common Law Obligations
PRV4 144
Common Law Property
PUB2 101D1/D2
Constitutional Law
PUB2 111
Criminal Law
PUB3 116D1/ D2
Foundations
2.  Complementary Courses
a) Complementary Civil Law Courses:
Students must take at least 4.5 credits (four and one-half credits) from the following list of advanced civil law and trans-systemic courses:
LEEL 369
Labour Law
LEEL 470
Employment Law
PROC 349
Lease, Enterprise, Suretyship
PRV1 255
Successions
PRV2 270
Law of Persons
PRV4 448
Administration Property of Another and Trusts
b) Complementary Common Law Courses:
Students must take at least 4.5 credits (four and one-half credits) from the following list of advanced common law and trans-systemic courses:
PRV3 434
Remedies
PRV4 435
Restitution
PRV4 449
Equity and Trusts
PRV4 451
Real Estate Transactions
PRV4 456
Wills and Estates
c) In addition, the following trans-systemic courses count for half their credit weight in each of the complementary common law and complementary civil law baskets:
BUS2 365
Business Associations
LAWG 200
Sale
LAWG 273
Family Law
LAWG 316
Private International Law
LAWG 300
Family Property Law
LAWG 400
Secured Transactions
LAWG 415
Evidence (Civil Matters)
PUB2 450
Comparative Federalism
WRIT 016D1/D2
Legal Methodology Teaching 1
WRIT 017D1/D2
Legal Methodology Teaching 2
d) Social Diversity and Human Rights Courses:
Students must take at least 3 credits from the following courses:
CMPL 500
Aboriginal Peoples and the Law
CMPL 504
Feminist Legal Theory
CMPL 511
Social Diversity and Law
CMPL 516
International Development Law
CMPL 556
Comparative Constitutional Protection Human Rights
CMPL 570
Protection of Minorities' Rights
CMPL 571
International Law of Human Rights
CMPL 573
Civil Liberties
CMPL 575
Discrimination and the Law
LEEL 482
Law and Poverty
PUB2 105
Public International Law
PUB2 419
Law and Psychiatry
PUB3 115
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
3.  Other Courses

Students must take such other complementary or elective courses as are offered within the Faculty or approved as credit equivalences in order to complete the 105 credit requirement.

For students who enter the Faculty in 2004-2005 or later, these other credits may include up to six non-Law credits. For students who entered the Faculty prior to 2004-2005, these other credits may include up to 12 non-Law credits.

4.  Minimum Writing Requirement

All students are required to submit at least one research paper. This requirement may be satisfied by:

a) writing an essay in a course in which the essay constitutes no less than 75% of the final grade;
b) writing a term essay under independent supervision, for credit, within the Faculty of Law;
c) writing an article, note or comment of equivalent substance that is published or accepted for publication in the McGill Law Journal and approved by the Faculty Adviser to that publication.

4.2 Law/Minor Programme

The B.C.L./LL.B. with Minor Programme is open to all students enrolled in the Faculty of Law and allows them to graduate with a Minor offered by McGill's Faculties of Arts or Science upon the completion of the requirements for the Minor. In so doing, they must complete 18 credits in addition to the 105 credits needed for the B.C.L./LL.B. programme. Since Science Minors are typically 24 credits whereas Arts Minor Concentrations are typically 18 credits, Law students will be allowed to count six credits of a 24 credit Minor Program towards their Law degree.

Law students should consult the Faculty of Arts and Faculty of Science sections of the Undergraduate Programs Calendar available at www.mcgill.ca/courses to determine the requirements for individual Minors.

4.3 Law/Major Concentration Programme

The B.C.L./LL.B. with Major Concentration is open to all students enrolled in the Faculty of Law and allows them to choose one of four designated Major Concentrations: Commercial Negotiation, Dispute Resolution, International Governance and Development, and Trial and Appellate Practice. Students must choose, as part of their 105 credits required in the B.C.L./LL.B. programme, at least 18 credits from the options corresponding to their chosen Major Concentration. In addition, students must complete a further 18 credits in their Major Concentration, for a total of 123 credits. Students will be granted a B.C.L./LL.B. with Major Concentration in [given area].

4.3.1 Curricular requirements for Major Concentration in Commercial Negotiation
1.   Complementary Courses (Group 1)
Students must take one of the following courses:
WRIT 491
Term Essay 1
WRIT 492
Term Essay 2
WRIT 493
Term Essay 3
WRIT 494
Term Essay 4
WRIT 495
Term Essay 5
WRIT 496
Term Essay 6

The essay must be written on a subject related to Commercial Negotiation.

2.   Complementary Courses (Group 2)

Students must take at least 33 credits from the following list of courses, of which at least 6 credits must be non-Law credits:

Law
 
CMPL 508
Research Seminar 1 (approval required)
CMPL 509
Research Seminar 2 (approval required)
CMPL 515
International Carriage of Goods by Sea
CMPL 521
Trade Regulation
CMPL 524
Entertainment Law
CMPL 543
Law and Practice of International Trade
CMPL 544
International and Domestic Documentary Sales
LAWG 200
Sale
LAWG 400
Secured Transactions
LAWG 500
Complex Legal Transactions 1
LAWG 501
Complex Legal Transactions 2
PROC 349
Lease, Enterprise, Suretyship
PRV4 435
Restitution
PRV5 483
Consumer Law
WRIT 301
Commercial Law Internship
WRIT 481
First Research Seminar (approval required)
WRIT 482
Second Research Seminar (approval required)
Economics
 
ECON 546
Game Theory
Management
MRKT 354
Marketing Management 2
MRKT 452
Consumer Behaviour
ORGB 420
Managing Organizational Teams

4.3.2 Curricular requirements for Major Concentration in Dispute Resolution
1.   Complementary Courses (Group 1)
Students must take one of the following courses:
WRIT 491
Term Essay 1
WRIT 492
Term Essay 2
WRIT 493
Term Essay 3
WRIT 494
Term Essay 4
WRIT 495
Term Essay 5
WRIT 496
Term Essay 6

The essay must be written on a subject related to Dispute Resolution.

2.   Complementary Courses (Group 2)

Students must take at least 33 credits from the following list of courses, of which at least 6 credits must be non-Law credits:

Law
 
CMPL 502
Canon Law
CMPL 508
Research Seminar 1 (approval required)
CMPL 509
Research Seminar 2 (approval required)
CMPL 513
Talmudic Law
CMPL 517
Comparative Legal Institutions
CMPL 518
Policies, Politics and Legislative Process
CMPL 521
Trade Regulation
CMPL 533
Resolution of International Disputes
LEEL 369
Labour Law
PUB2 400
The Administrative Process
WRIT 300D1/D2
Dispute Resolution Internship
WRIT 440
Clerkship A
WRIT 481
First Research Seminar (approval required)
WRIT 482
Second Research Seminar (approval required)
Educational and Counselling Psychology
EDPC 501
Helping Relationships
EDPC 502
Group Processes and Individuals
Islamic Studies
ISLA 706D1/D2
Islamic Law
Jewish Studies
JWST 316
Social and Ethical Issues Jewish Law 1
Management
ORGB 633
Managerial Negotiations
Political Science
POLI 677
International Crisis, Conflict, War
Social Work
 
SWRK 374
Community Development/Social Action

4.3.3 Curricular requirements for Major Concentration in International Development and Governance
1.   Complementary Courses (Group 1)
Students must take one of the following courses:
WRIT 491
Term Essay 1
WRIT 492
Term Essay 2
WRIT 493
Term Essay 3
WRIT 494
Term Essay 4
WRIT 495
Term Essay 5
WRIT 496
Term Essay 6

The essay must be written on a subject related to International Development and Governance.

2.   Complementary Courses (Group 2)

Students must take at least 33 credits from the following list of courses, of which at least 6 credits must be non-Law credits:

Law
 
ASPL 637
Space Law: General Principles
CMPL 508
Research Seminar 1 (approval required)
CMPL 509
Research Seminar 2 (approval required)
CMPL 516
International Development Law
CMPL 521
Trade Regulation
CMPL 533
Resolution of International Disputes
CMPL 546
International Environmental Law
CMPL 570
Protection of Minorities' Rights
CMPL 571
International Law of Human Rights
CMPL 579
Current Problems of International Legal Order
PUB2 105
Public International Law
WRIT 020
International Human Rights Internship
WRIT 302D1/D2
International Governance Internship
WRIT 481
First Research Seminar (approval required)
WRIT 482
Second Research Seminar (approval required)
Anthropology
ANTH 342
Gender, Inequality & the State
ANTH 439
Theories of Development
Economics
ECON 453D1/D2
International Economics - Honours
Geography
GEOG 408
Geography of Development
GEOG 410
Geography of Underdevelopment: Current Problems
Management
MPGO 469
Managing Globalization
Political Science
POLI 522
Seminar: Developing Areas

4.3.4 Curricular requirements for Major Concentration in Trial and Appellate Practice
1.   Complementary Courses (Group 1)
Students must take one of the following courses:
WRIT 491
Term Essay 1
WRIT 492
Term Essay 2
WRIT 493
Term Essay 3
WRIT 494
Term Essay 4
WRIT 495
Term Essay 5
WRIT 496
Term Essay 6

The essay must be written on a subject related to Trial and Appellate Practice.

2.   Complementary Courses (Group 2)

Students must take at least 33 credits from the following list of courses, of which at least 6 credits must be non-Law credits:

Law
 
CMPL 508
Research Seminar 1 (approval required)
CMPL 509
Research Seminar 2 (approval required)
LAWG 415
Evidence (Civil Matters)
LAWG 426
Evidence (Criminal Matters)
PRAC 159
Advanced Appellate Court Advocacy
PRAC 188
Advanced Mooting 1
PRAC 195
Advanced Mooting 2
PROC 425
Judicial Law and Evidence
PROC 459
Civil Litigation Workshop
PRV3 434
Remedies
PUB2 420
Trial Advocacy
PUB2 421
Advanced Criminal Law
PUB2 422
Criminal Procedure
PUB2 424
Sentencing in Canadian Law
WRIT 303D1/D2
Court Practice Internship
WRIT 440D1/D2
Clerkship A
WRIT 481
First Research Seminar (approval required)
WRIT 482
Second Research Seminar (approval required)
Communications
ENGC 649
Audience Analysis
Economics
ECON 546
Game Theory
Philosophy
PHIL 210
Introduction to Deductive Logic 1
PHIL 415
Philosophy of Language
Sociology
SOCI 350
Statistics in Social Research
SOCI 511
Movements/Collective Action

4.4 Law/Honours Programme

The B.C.L./LL.B. with Honours programme is open to students who have completed four terms of study at the Faculty of Law and who, during that time, have maintained a GPA of 3.0. Students must complete 15 credits in addition to the 105 credits required in the B.C.L./LL.B. programme. Conditional upon submission and approval of an Honours Thesis, students will be granted a B.C.L./LL.B. with Honours.

4.5 M.B.A./Law Programme

A joint M.B.A./Law programme is offered by the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Management.

Applicants wishing to pursue the joint programme must make separate concurrent applications to the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Management. Admission to the Faculty of Law is made on the same criteria as though the applicant were applying only into the Law programme. Admission to the Faculty of Management depends upon, among other things, the student's performance on the GMAT. For further information about the M.B.A. programme, please contact the Faculty of Management.

Please note that students must have completed an undergraduate degree in order to be admissible to the M.B.A. programme. Candidates applying into the joint M.B.A./Law programme should indicate in their personal statement their reason for doing so.

Students in the joint M.B.A./Law programme will do their first year in the M.B.A. programme. The following year, they will do their first year of Law. The programme requires the completion of a total of 141 credits consisting of 93 Law credits and 48 M.B.A. credits. Students who successfully complete the programme will receive, usually after four and a one-half years, a B.C.L., an LL.B. and a M.B.A.

4.6 Law/M.S.W. Programme

McGill's Faculty of Law and School of Social Work offer a joint programme enabling students to obtain both civil law and common law degrees, and a Master's in Social Work.

Applicants to the joint Law/M.S.W. programme must make separate concurrent applications to the School of Social Work and the Faculty of Law. Acceptance into the joint programme is dependent on the applicant being admitted to both the School of Social Work for M.S.W. and the Faculty of Law for the B.C.L./LL.B. Admission to the Faculty of Law is made on the same criteria as though the applicant were applying into the Law programme.

Please note that candidates must hold a Bachelor's degree in Social Work in order to be eligible for admission to the M.S.W. programme. Candidates applying into the joint Law/M.S.W. programme should indicate in their personal statement their reasons for doing so.

The joint Law/M.S.W. programme requires the completion of a total of 132 credits. Students who successfully complete the programme will receive, usually after four years, a B.C.L., an LL.B. and an M.S.W.

4.7 Course Sequences by Year

These regulations set out for each year in the Faculty, the courses which are streamed for that year. All other courses, i.e., courses not indicated by year, may be freely taken in any year after the first, subject to further restrictions and prerequisites which may be imposed from time to time. These rules may be set aside in the case of students authorized to study on a part-time basis, and students pursuing approved joint degrees with other Faculties within the University.

1. The following courses may be taken only in the first year
 
LAWG 100D1/D2
Contractual Obligations
 
LAWG 101D1/D2
Extra-contractual Obligations/Torts
 
PRAC 147D1/D2
Introductory Legal Research
 
PRV1 144D1/D2
Civil Law Property
 
PUB2 101D1/D2
Constitutional Law
 
PUB3 116D1/D2
Foundations
2. In the first year, students may take one of the following courses:
 
LAWG 273
Family Law
 
PUB2 105
Public International Law
 
PUB2 111
Criminal Law
 
PUB2 400
Administrative Process
3. The following courses may be taken only in the second year:
 
PRAC 155D1/D2
Legal Writing, Mooting and Advanced Legal Research
 
PROC 200
Advanced Civil Law Obligations
 
PRV3 200
Advanced Common Law Obligations
 
PRV4 144
Common Law Property
4.7.1 Students Enrolled in the M.B.A./Law Programme

The first year of studies for the M.B.A./Law Programme is composed exclusively of the required courses for the M.B.A.

In their second year, students are required to take their first year law courses. Thereafter, normal Faculty course sequence rules apply.

5 Undergraduate Courses of Instruction

5.1 Regular Courses

The Senate of McGill University has authorized the Faculty of Law to offer the following courses. Not all courses will be offered in 2004-05. More detailed information on course availability, course content, prerequisites, course sections, French language sections, limitations on enrolment, instructors and mode of evaluation is provided at the close of each academic year upon Early Course Registration for the next academic session. Course registration materials may also be found on the Faculty's Web site: www.law. mcgill.ca/academics.

Refer to section "Institute of Comparative Law" for descriptions of the 500-level courses available to undergraduate students. Students may also, with the permission of the Director of the Institute and of the Assistant Dean (Student Affairs), enrol in certain courses offered by the Institute of Air and Space Law, see section .

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

Courses with numbers ending D1 and D2

are taught in two consecutive terms (most commonly Fall and Winter). Students must register for both the D1 and D2 components. No credit will be given unless both components (D1 and D2) are successfully completed in consecutive terms.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05
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BUS1 414 Estate Planning.
(3) Attribution and basic income splitting techniques, estate planning and capital gain tax exemption, income tax consequences arising upon death, tax of estate and trust and their beneficiaries, post mortem tax planning, estate freezes, transfer of family businesses, income tax aspects of buy-sell agreements between shareholders, basic principles of valuation, deferred income plans, retirement planning, registered charities, income tax consequences of matrimonial regimes. Particular emphasis will be placed upon those aspects of personal and corporate income tax which are relevant in designing and implementing estate plans.
BUS1 432 Bankruptcy.
(3) Federal bankruptcy law, including bankruptcy petitions, an individual's rights to a discharge, the nature of claims provable in bankruptcy, the rejection and assumption of executory contracts, the stay of proceedings and the avoidance powers of trustees and receiverships and workouts as alternatives to bankruptcy proceedings. Students may not take both this course and either Bankruptcy and Insolvency or Protection and Enforcement of Creditors' Rights.
BUS2 365 Business Associations.
(4) An introduction to agency or mandate, partnership and co-operatives. The nature of corporate personality; the two systems of incorporation; constitutional problems; the raising and maintenance of a company's capital; the organs of the company; and protection of investors and minority shareholders.
BUS2 367 Business Organizations.
(3) A treatment of specialized topics in the law of business organizations.
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BUS2 372 Securities Regulation.
(3) After an introduction to the structure of Canada's capital markets, this course will review the major features of the regulation of those markets. Attention will focus on either the Ontario or the Quebec scheme. A study of the premises behind and the problems of implementing the major regulatory techniques of occupational licensing of securities professionals, disclosure to new issue buyers and to other investors, and administration of the regulatory scheme by securities commissions.
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BUS2 461 Insurance.
(3) The general principles of the insurance contract under the law of Quebec, with reference to the Ontario Insurance Act and the insurance acts of other common law provinces.
BUS2 463 Intellectual and Industrial Property.
(3) This is a survey course intended to provide an overview of the law of patents, copyright, trade marks, industrial designs, and confidential information. It covers problems that counsel might encounter in a general corporate practice. It examines the legal protection available against unfair competition and the proprietary rights accorded to interests in information and ideas having economic value e.g. inventions, literary, musical and other artistic works, designs, commercial symbols, trade marks and trade secrets.
BUS2 464 Corporate Finance.
(3) Finance economics and legal aspects of the financial policy of corporations. Issues to be raised include valuation theory, corporate reorganizations and the rights of senior security holders, capital structure, dividend theory and corporate distributions, agency costs and the theory of the firm, corporate combinations and take-over bids and the regulation of market intermediaries. Insider trading may also be considered.
BUS2 465 Banking and Negotiable Instruments.
(2) Canadian law of negotiable instruments, with emphasis on the Bills of Exchange Act. The concept and attributes of negotiability. Bills of exchange, cheques, and promissory notes. Banker and customer; banker's security; letters of credit; credit cards and other recent developments. The relationship of federal and provincial laws.
LAWG 100D1 (3), LAWG 100D2 (3) Contractual Obligations.
(Students must register for both LAWG 100D1 and LAWG 100D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both LAWG 100D1 and LAWG 100D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Basic concepts of contractual obligation in the Civil and Common Law. Formation and consent; formalities; cause and consideration; relativity of contracts and privity; lesion and unconscionability; performance and breach; frustration and force majeure; contractual remedies.
LAWG 101D1 (2.5), LAWG 101D2 (2.5) Extra-Contractual Obligations/Torts.
(Students must register for both LAWG 101D1 and LAWG 101D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both LAWG 101D1 and LAWG 101D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Basic concepts of extra-contractual obligations in the Civil and Common Law. Fault; causation; reasons for exoneration; apportionment of liability; forms of injury for which recovery can be obtained; limitations on damages; factual and legal presumptions; responsibility for the acts of others and for damage caused by property.
LAWG 200 Sale.
(4) The contract of sale in the civil law and common law traditions. Nature and scope of the contract of sale; conditions of formation; obligations of the vendor/seller, including delivery, quality, title; obligations of the buyer, transfer of title; manufacturer's liability.
LAWG 273 Family Law.
(3) Study of conjugality and other close personal relationships as understood by law; parent-child relationships; dissolution of conjugal relationships; support rights at the end of close personal relationships.
LAWG 300 Family Property Law.
(3) (Prerequisites: PRV1 144 or PRV4 144 or permission of instructor.) Administration of and entitelment to wealth in conjugal and other close personal relationships, in common and civil law, with consideration of other legal traditions. Management and distribution of family resources through matrimonial regimes, marriage and domestic contracts, household mandates, common law trusts, legislative division of family assets, liberalities, social practice.
LAWG 316 Private International Law.
(3) The function, nature and sources of Private International Law in the common law and civil law traditions. Conflicts of laws; general operation of conflict rules (application of foreign law, substitution of laws of forum). Conflicts of jurisdiction and recognition of foreign judgments. Harmonization and unification of laws.
LAWG 400 Secured Transactions.
(4) Main incidents of law and suretyship and the law of real security in the common and civil traditions; security on land and commodities; nature of suretyship and effects of a contract among the creditor, debtor, surety and co-sureties; classifications and types of preferences, priorities and real security.
LAWG 415 Evidence (Civil Matters).
(3) Basic principles of evidence as applied and developed in the context of the civil process in all jurisdictions in Canada. Topics include: burden and standard of proof; relevance; the different kinds of evidence, i.e. documentary evidence; testimonial evidence (lay and opinion evidence), presumptions, admissions and real evidence; the principal rules of admissibility, including the hearsay rule and its exceptions.
LAWG 426 Evidence (Criminal Matters).
(3) An introduction to principles of evidence with a focus on admissibility in criminal matters. Topics include relevance, hearsay, opinion, character, similar facts, confessions and illegally-obtained evidence. The course begins with a discussion of burdens and standards of proof.
LEEL 369 Labour Law.
(3) An introduction to Canadian labour law including collective bargaining, arbitration and industrial relations generally. Emphasis on the Canada Labour Code, the Quebec Labour Code and related statutes.
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LEEL 470 Employment Law.
(3) Survey of the employment contract including hiring practices, dismissals, duties of the employer and the employee including loyalty, non-competition, impact of statutes (Labour Standards Act, Charter of the French Language, etc...) and recourses. The purpose of the course is to deal with non-collective agreement employment contracts, which govern most of the working population.
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LEEL 482 Law and Poverty.
(3) The differential character of the law concerning rich and poor as reflected in case studies in criminal law, consumer law, housing law, welfare law. The "delivery systems" available for legal services to the poor and alternative organizational models for legal services; the role of law schools, government and the professional bar.
PRAC 147D1 (1.5), PRAC 147D2 (1.5) Introductory Legal Research.
(Students must register for both PRAC 147D1 and PRAC 147D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both PRAC 147D1 and PRAC 147D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Introduction to legal research skills in Civil and Common Law jurisdictions, including computer-assisted research. Teaching occurs in small groups, and focuses on materials from courts, administrative tribunals, legislatures, executive and administrative agencies, and some international sources. In so doing, it provides an introduction to basic issues of process and authority.
PRAC 155D1 (1), PRAC 155D2 (1) Legal Writing, Mooting and Advanced Legal Research.
(Students must register for both PRAC 155D1 and PRAC 155D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both PRAC 155D1 and PRAC 155D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) This second year course complements the first year PRAC 147. Students are required to complete a mooting exercise involving the preparation of an appellate court factum as well as an oral presentation. They are also required to draft a legal memorandum, and/or, as the case may be, other writing assignments, and are introduced to advanced and foreign legal materials.
PROC 124 Judicial Institutions and Civil Procedure.
(4) Pre-trial civil procedure and applications for appeal in Canada. Launching a civil action and pleadings; jurisdiction and judicial organization; prerogative writs and evocation; motions and interlocutory relief; pre-trial mediation and settlement; discovery and costs. Emphasis on Quebec Code of Civil Procedure, Ontario Courts of Justice Act and Rules of Practice, Supreme Court Rules and Federal Court Rules.
PROC 200 Advanced Civil Law Obligations.
(2) General theory of obligations in the Civil Law tradition, the interaction of contractual and extra-contractual obligations; introduction to unjust enrichment; relationship of general law to special regimes of compensation such as no-fault regimes; certain aspects of the modalities, transfer, alteration and extinction of obligations.
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PROC 349 Lease, Enterprise, Suretyship.
(3) The contracts of lease, including some aspects of residential leases, enterprise and suretyship in the law of Quebec.
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PROC 425 Judicial Law and Evidence.
(3) Trial before the Court, from inscription to judgment. Proof and hearing; the principles of the law of evidence with emphasis on substantive rules in civil law. Special proceedings relating to the production of evidence. Declaratory judgments. Provisional remedies, including injunctions. Remedies against judgments.
PROC 459 Civil Litigation Workshop.
(3) A workshop on specialized problems in civil litigation and evidence; the preparation and management of a civil case, particularly as regards the conduct of discovery proceedings and the production of materials to be used at trial.
PRV1 144D1 (2.5), PRV1 144D2 (2.5) Civil Law Property.
(Students must register for both PRV1 144D1 and PRV1 144D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both PRV1 144D1 and PRV1 144D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) The theoretical framework of property law. The patrimony and the basic classifications of property. The evolution of land rights in Quebec including the rights of Native Peoples. The study of real rights and their modalities. Possession and its effects. Publicity and its effects. Some consideration of regulation in the public interest and the interest of the family.
PRV1 255 Successions.
(3) The gratuitous transmission of property in the law of Quebec by reason of gift, will, trust or legal succession.
PRV2 270 Law of Persons.
(3) The existence and attributes of physical and legal persons in the Civil Law of Quebec. Modes of recognition of legal persons. Enjoyment and exercise of civil and personality rights; domicile; acts of civil status; capacity and regimes of supervised protection. Some introduction to rights under the Quebec and Canadian Charter.
PRV2 456 Children and the Law.
(3) An analysis of the rights and protection of children under the civil law of Quebec. The impact of reproductive technology on the law affecting children (personhood, filiation, adoption, civil remedies), the rights and protection of minors (child abuse and neglect, emancipation, representation) and the role of parents, the state and the court in child welfare. Comparisons with other jurisdictions will be pursued.
PRV3 200 Advanced Common Law Obligations.
(2) Relationship between tort, contract, and restitution in theory and practice (including consideration of negligent misrepresentation, economic loss, exclusion clauses, and means of overcoming problems of privity); relationship between Common law and no-fault regimes; special problems in civil liability, such as non-feasance and the liability of public authorities.
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PRV3 434 Remedies.
(3) A study of selected private law remedies available at common law, in equity and under statute.
PRV4 144 Common Law Property.
(4) Classification of proprietary interests; concepts of ownership, seisin and possession; legal and equitable interests; acquisition of proprietary interests including gifts and assignments; doctrine of estates; future interests; concurrent ownership; rights in property of another including bailments, covenants, easements, profits and licenses; adverse possession; proprietary remedies; registration systems.
PRV4 145 Land Use Planning.
(3) A study of private and public control of land use and development, including: constitutional jurisdiction; provincial, regional and local planning; regulatory and discretionary tools (e.g., zoning by-laws, subdivision control, site-plan control), acquired rights; expropriation, land values and compensation, protection of sensitive areas (e.g. heritage property, agricultural land).
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PRV4 435 Restitution.
(3) The law relating to the restitution of benefits wrongfully or unfairly acquired: a study of unjust enrichment as a doctrinal basis for various remedies at common law, in equity and under statute and the role of restitution as an integral part of the common law alongside contract and tort.
PRV4 449 Equity and Trusts.
(3) A consideration of the law of gratuitous transfers, concentrating on the express trust: the nature of the trust, the creation and conditions of validity of the trust, effect of failure, obligations and interests arising under the trust, variation, renovation, and termination of the trust. Related topics such as gifts, wills, intestate succession, powers of appointment and the rule against perpetuities may also be discussed.
PRV4 451 Real Estate Transactions.
(3) Problems arising out of the vendor and purchaser relationship. The contract of sale in its drafting, interpretation and enforcement; fixtures, recording and land titles systems; mortgages. Emphasis on the law of Ontario.
PRV4 456 Wills and Estates.
(2) Formal and intrinsic validity of domestic and international wills; survivorship; the administration of estates; methods of transmitting property on death other than by will; intestate succession; dependents' relief.
PRV5 182 Advanced Torts.
(2) This seminar examines in depth one or more selected problems in the law of torts such as protection of privacy, interference with economic and other relations, defamation, products liability, professional malpractice, strict liability, the future of tort law, and statutory compensation schemes.
PUB2 101D1 (3), PUB2 101D2 (3) Constitutional Law.
(Students must register for both PUB2 101D1 and PUB2 101D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both PUB2 101D1 and PUB2 101D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) A comprehensive treatment of the theory, law and practice of the constitution, including legislative, executive and judicial institutions in Canada. The rule of law in executive government and in the lawmaking process. Parliamentary sovereignty, constitutional amendment, and the federal system, including the division of legislative powers. Guarantees of fundamental freedoms with emphasis on the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
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PUB2 102 Constitutional Law of the United States.
(3) An introduction to constitutional law in the United States, including an examination of the role of the Supreme Court, the separation of legislative, executive and judicial powers, federalism, fundamental rights, freedom of expression and religion, equal protection and the state action doctrine.
PUB2 105 Public International Law.
(3) The traditional fields of International Law including nature and sources; recognition, territory and acquisition of territory; jurisdiction on the high seas; nationality; diplomatic and consular privileges and immunities; responsibility of states; interpretation of treaties; legal control of force and aspects of the U.N. Charter, special Canadian problems of international law.
PUB2 111 Criminal Law.
(3) The exploration of major problems in criminal law and its administration; emphasis on basic concepts which govern the implementation of the Criminal Code in Canada.
PUB2 202 Problems in Constitutional Law.
(2) A seminar designed to provide an opportunity to study selected problems in constitutional law in Canada or in other countries.
PUB2 313 Taxation.
(4) The general principles of Canadian income tax law. The emphasis is on federal, personal and corporation tax with some reference to Quebec income tax law.
PUB2 400 The Administrative Process.
(3) The administrative process and the legal structure of administrative agencies. Statutory interpretation, delegated legislation, policy rules, administrative discretion, administrative procedures and problems of institutional design will be considered in the context of some contemporary administrative agencies.
PUB2 401 Judicial Review of Administrative Action.
(3) The control of administrative decision-makers. Problems of delegation, formal jurisdiction, natural justice and errors of fact and law. Judicial review remedies; appeals; reconsideration; tort and contractual liability of administrative agencies; privative clauses; public inquiries; ombudsman schemes.
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PUB2 402 Statute Law.
(2)
PUB2 403 Municipal Law.
(2) Municipal institutions in the Province of Quebec and their constitution and powers. Judicial review of the acts of municipal authorities and officers in the general context of administrative law. Judicial nullity and other problems. Municipal taxation. Civil responsibility.
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PUB2 413 Current Problems in Taxation.
(2) A detailed examination of major current commercial taxation problems.
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PUB2 415 Tax Policy.
(3) Public aspects of tax legislation; federal-provincial agreements; tax sharing and equalization; municipal aspects; social problems in tax policy. Negative tax and re-distribution of resources.
PUB2 417 Corporate Taxation.
(3) In-depth consideration of problems unique to corporations and their shareholders including the small business deduction and refundable taxes; distributions to shareholders; corporate reorganizations and liquidations; the capital gain and rollover.
PUB2 419 Law and Psychiatry.
(3) (Open to a limited number of students in Law, Psychiatry and Psychology) The roles of lawyers and psychiatrists in the handling of the mentally ill within the legal process. Consideration of the civil commitment and criminal commitment processes, insanity and "automatism" defences, the psychiatrist as expert witness, mental illness as a problem in relation to legal capacity. Some sessions will be conducted jointly with members of the psychiatric profession.
PUB2 420 Trial Advocacy.
(3) The basic techniques of examination and cross-examination of witnesses in the context of a series of simulated trials. The emphasis is on active participation and on practical exercises in the basic problem areas: the unfolding of the narrative; the use of suggestive questions and the aide-mÈmoire; cross-examination and contradiction with prior written and oral statements; the production of exhibits and documentary proof. The framework is primarily one of criminal and statutory law, where these techniques are much more tightly defined.
PUB2 421 Advanced Criminal Law.
(3) Specific crimes and defenses, and problems in procedure, as a continuation of Criminal Law and Criminal Procedure. Selected topics will be announced in advance.
PUB2 422 Criminal Procedure.
(3) Principles of the law of criminal procedure. An examination of the criminal process from the point of suspicion to trial and appeal. The relationship to the process of the legal rights contained in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms will be examined.
PUB2 424 Sentencing in Canadian Law.
(3) Survey of principles of sentencing and correctional law in Canada. This course reviews general principles such as aims of punishment, matters of procedures and evidence, and review of sentences by appellate courts. A detailed examination of selected topics include participation of victims in sentencing, dangerous offenders, native offenders, homicide cases.
PUB2 425 International Criminal Law.
(3) Crimes against the law of nations, war crimes (the Nuremburg trials, the Eichman case), genocide and the way in which states co-operate to fight organized crime, terrorism, hijacking, etc. Topics include: jurisdiction (crimes committed in foreign countries, at sea, in aircraft, extradition, international judicial assistance) and the recognition and enforcement of foreign criminal sentences.
PUB2 450 Comparative Federalism.
(3) Institutional design of federal states, or of supra-national arrangements, in comparative perspective. Rationale for federal constitutions; confederal vs. federal organization; symmetric vs. asymmetric federations; allocation of powers; the subsidiarity principle; accession to and secession from the federation; the place of popular sovereignty; federalism within central legislative or executive institutions.
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PUB2 451 Immigration and Refugee Law.
(3) A study of Canadian and Quebec immigration and refugee law, practice and policy, with particular exploration of the historical development-and contemporary paradox-of border regulation; interface with national security, employment policy and trade theory; admissions categories and the construction of illegality; impact of Charter and international human rights law.
PUB3 115 Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
(3) A critical analysis of the Charter and its implications for the legal process in general, and domestic human rights law in particular, organized around the following themes: pre-Charter human rights law and its legacy; general considerations respecting the entrenchment, application and interpretation of the Charter; procedural issues and judicial review under the Charter; advocacy under the Charter.
PUB3 116D1 (2), PUB3 116D2 (2) Foundations.
(Students must register for both PUB3 116D1 and PUB3 116D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both PUB3 116D1 and PUB3 116D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Overview of the spirit, history, and sources of Civil and Common Law traditions in their Canadian manifestations; introduction to Aboriginal legal traditions. The course explores issues of legal history and institutions, relationship between private and public law, comparative methodology, legal theory and ethics.
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PUB3 424 Legal Profession and Ethics.
(3) An examination of the ethical and moral issues which confront lawyers practising in a variety of settings. Consideration is given to the Canons of Ethics promulgated by the Quebec Bar, the Law Society of Upper Canada, the Canadian Bar Association and the American Bar Association, with emphasis on standards of professional conduct and mechanisms for enforcing appropriate behaviour.
WRIT 400D1 (3), WRIT 400D2 (3) Senior Essay.
(Students must register for both WRIT 400D1 and WRIT 400D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 400D1 and WRIT 400D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Students may, with the permission of the Dean or Dean's delegate, and on conditions set from time to time by the Faculty, elect to write a senior essay. This essay must have a scope and ambition sufficient to constitute a major element in the student's legal education. To be eligible to write a senior essay, a student must have completed at least four terms in the Faculty. Only one such essay may be submitted by a given student for credit.
WRIT 450 Honours Thesis 1.
(3) (Restriction: Students must be accepted into Honours program) Preparation of honours thesis proposal and literature review.
WRIT 451 Honours Thesis 2.
(6) (Prerequisite: WRIT 450) (Restriction: Student must be accepted into Honours program) Thesis research report.
WRIT 452 Honours Thesis 3.
(6) (Prerequisites: WRIT 450, WRIT 451) (Restriction: Students must be accepted into Honours program) Completion of Honours thesis.
WRIT 461 Writing and Drafting Project.
(1) A one-credit add-on to existing substantive law courses. Students undertake one or more writing exercises, e.g. drafting opinion letters or research memoranda. This add-on may be used once only, in final year of study, with permission of Dean or Dean's delegate. For undergraduate students, project must relate to a course successfully completed in a previous term and be supervised by Faculty instructor with expertise in the area.
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WRIT 481 First Research Seminar.
(2) (Open to third and fourth year students only) The First Research Seminar is designed to provide students with the opportunity of undertaking advanced study and research in selected areas of public or private law under the direction of members of Faculty who have a special interest or expertise in such areas. There may be more than one section of the Seminar and each may pursue a separate subject matter.
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WRIT 482 Second Research Seminar.
(2) (Open to third and fourth year students only) The Second Research Seminar is designed to provide students with the opportunity of undertaking advanced study and research in selected areas of public or private law under the direction of members of the Faculty who have a special interest or expertise in such areas. There may be more than one section of the Seminar and each may pursue a separate subject matter.
WRIT 491 Term Essay 1.
(3) Students who have completed two terms of legal studies may elect with the permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate to write an essay for 3 credits under the supervision of an instructor in the Faculty.
WRIT 492 Term Essay 2.
(3) Students who have completed two terms of legal studies may elect with the permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate to write an essay for 3 credits under the supervision of an instructor in the Faculty.
WRIT 493 Term Essay 3.
(3) Students who have completed two terms of legal studies may elect with the permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate to write an essay for 3 credits under the supervision of an instructor in the Faculty.
WRIT 494 Term Essay 4.
(3) Students who have completed two terms of legal studies may elect with the permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate to write an essay for 3 credits under the supervision of an instructor in the Faculty.
WRIT 495 Term Essay 5.
(3) Students who have completed two terms of legal studies may elect with the permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate to write an essay for 3 credits under the supervision of an instructor in the Faculty.
WRIT 496 Term Essay 6.
(3) Students who have completed two terms of legal studies may elect with the permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate to write an essay for 3 credits under the supervision of an instructor in the Faculty.

5.2 Faculty Supervised Equivalences

Credits are awarded as equivalences, upon the recommendation of the designated member of the professorial staff, for student participation in the following supervised activities.

PRAC 188 Advanced Mooting 1.
(3) (Advanced Mooting includes mooting competitions such as the Jessup International Moot, Concours Charles-Rousseau, Gale Cup Moot, Tribunal École Pierre-Basile Mignault, etc) Participation, under Faculty supervision, as a Faculty representative, in an advanced mooting competition approved for this purpose by the Dean. Students may register for Advanced Mooting a maximum of twice.
PRAC 195 Advanced Mooting 2.
(3) (Advanced Mooting includes mooting competitions such as the Jessup International Moot, Concours Charles-Rousseau, Gale Cup Moot, Tribunal École Pierre-Basile Mignault, etc) Participation, under Faculty supervision, as a Faculty representative, in an advanced mooting competition approved for this purpose by the Dean. Students may register for Advanced Mooting a maximum of twice.
WRIT 016D1 (2), WRIT 016D2 (2) Legal Methodology Teaching 1.
(Prerequisite: four full-time terms in Law) (Restriction: not open to students who have taken WRIT 017D1 and WRIT 017D2) (Students must register for both WRIT 016D1 and WRIT 016D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 016D1 and WRIT 016D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) A course in which, under the supervision of a Faculty member, the student reviews the fundamental components of legal research and advocacy, and participates in the design and administration of exercises to impart to first year law students those components in the course Introductory Legal Research.
WRIT 017D1 (2), WRIT 017D2 (2) Legal Methodology Teaching 2.
(Not open to students who have taken WRIT 016D1 and WRIT 016D2) (Students must register for both WRIT 017D1 and WRIT 017D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 017D1 and WRIT 017D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) The legal writing and presentation of oral arguments, as well as legal research with an emphasis on foreign legal materials. Students are also responsible for a significant portion of the instructional component of the course Legal Writing, Mooting and Advanced Legal Research.
WRIT 020 International Human Rights Internship.
(6) Participation in an international human rights internship approved by the Faculty. This course provides dedicated students with exposure to the law and practice of international human rights, encouraging them to reflect on the relationship between that experience and their studies. A written report is required. Students must obtain the approval of the Dean or Dean's delegate for their participation and for the terms of the internship.
WRIT 048 Group Assistants.
(2) A limited number of candidates who have completed four terms in the Faculty may elect once only, with the permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate, to work as Group Assistants in an approved course. Candidates must file an application prior to the end of the first week of term in which they propose to serve as Group Assistants and file a written report on their work by the last day of classes in that term for which they receive credit.
WRIT 300D1 (3), WRIT 300D2 (3) Dispute Resolution Internship.
(Restriction: Students must apply for the internship by third year registration deadline.) (Students must register for both WRIT 300D1 and WRIT 300D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 300D1 and WRIT 300D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) A limited number of students who have completed four tems in the Faculty may, with permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate, work only once as an intern in an approved internship relating to dispute resolution.
WRIT 301D1 (3), WRIT 301D2 (3) Commercial Law Internship.
(Restriction: Student must apply for the internship by third year registration deadline.) (Students must register for both WRIT 301D1 and WRIT 301D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 301D1 and WRIT 301D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) A limited number of students who have completed four terms in the Faculty may, with the permission of the Dean of the Dean's delegate, work only once as an intern in an approved internship relating to commercial negotiation.
WRIT 302D1 (3), WRIT 302D2 (3) International Governance Internship.
(Restriction: Student must apply for the internship by third year registration deadline.) (Students must register for both WRIT 302D1 and WRIT 302D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 302D1 and WRIT 302D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) A limited number of students who have completed four terms in the Faculty may, with the permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate, work only once as an intern in an approved internship relating to international governance and development.
WRIT 303D1 (3), WRIT 303D2 (3) Court Practice Internship.
(Restriction: Student must apply for the internship by third year registration deadline.) (Students must register for both WRIT 303D1 and WRIT 303D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 303D1 and WRIT 303D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) A limited number of students who have completed four terms in the Faculty may, with the permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate, work only once as an intern in an approved internship relating to trial and appellate practice.
WRIT 400D1 (3), WRIT 400D2 (3) Senior Essay.
(Students must register for both WRIT 400D1 and WRIT 400D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 400D1 and WRIT 400D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Students may, with the permission of the Dean or Dean's delegate, and on conditions set from time to time by the Faculty, elect to write a senior essay. This essay must have a scope and ambition sufficient to constitute a major element in the student's legal education. To be eligible to write a senior essay, a student must have completed at least four terms in the Faculty. Only one such essay may be submitted by a given student for credit.
WRIT 433D1 (3), WRIT 433D2 (3) Legal Clinic (Fall/Winter).
(Students must register for both WRIT 433D1 and WRIT 433D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 433D1 and WRIT 433D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)
WRIT 434 Summer Legal Clinic.
(3)
WRIT 436 Note Project 1.
(2) (Students may not take the note project and work for credit at the McGill Law Journal during their law program.) Requires enrolment in each of two linked courses (see Note Project 2). Interested students collectively propose an essay topic and write individual essays on subjects related to the general approved topic. No more than one Note Project per year is approved. Letter grade will be assigned.
WRIT 437 Note Project 2.
(2) (Students may not take the note project and work for credit at the McGill Law Journal during their law program.) Students draw on their individual essays (see Note Project 1) to produce a single article on the approved topic. The resulting article is to be submitted to the McGill Law Journal. Graded on Pass/Fail basis.
WRIT 440D1 (3), WRIT 440D2 (3) Clerkship A.
(Students must register for both WRIT 440D1 and WRIT 440D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 440D1 and WRIT 440D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) (WRIT 440D1 and WRIT 440D2 together are equivalent to WRIT 400) Students who have completed four terms in the Faculty may, with permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate, work only once as a clerk for a judge of the Quebec Court of Appeal, Quebec Superior Court, Quebec Court or an administrative tribunal under general Faculty Supervision.
WRIT 441 Clerkship B.
(3) Students who have completed four terms in the Faculty may, with permission of the Dean or the Dean's delegate, work only once as a clerk for a judge of the Quebec Court of Appeal, Quebec Superior Court, Quebec Court or an administrative tribunal under general Faculty Supervision.
McGILL LAW JOURNAL
WRIT 001D1 (3), WRIT 001D2 (3) McGill Law Journal - Editor-in-Chief.
(Students must register for both WRIT 001D1 and WRIT 001D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 001D1 and WRIT 001D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)
WRIT 002D1 (3), WRIT 002D2 (3) McGill Law Journal - Executive Editor.
(Students must register for both WRIT 002D1 and WRIT 002D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 002D1 and WRIT 002D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)
WRIT 003D1 (3), WRIT 003D2 (3) McGill Law Journal - Managing Editor.
(Students must register for both WRIT 003D1 and WRIT 003D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 003D1 and WRIT 003D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)
WRIT 004D1 (1.5), WRIT 004D2 (1.5) McGill Law Journal - Senior Board.
(Eleven positions) (Students must register for both WRIT 004D1 and WRIT 004D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 004D1 and WRIT 004D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)
WRIT 008D1 (2), WRIT 008D2 (2) McGill Law Journal - Associate Editor.
(Students must register for both WRIT 008D1 and WRIT 008D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 008D1 and WRIT 008D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)
WRIT 009D1 (2), WRIT 009D2 (2) McGill Law Journal - Case Comments Editor.
(Students must register for both WRIT 009D1 and WRIT 009D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 009D1 and WRIT 009D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)
WRIT 010D1 (2), WRIT 010D2 (2) McGill Law Journal Book Reviews Editor.
(Students must register for both WRIT 010D1 and WRIT 010D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 010D1 and WRIT 010D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms)
WRIT 011 McGill Law Journal - Junior Board.
(3) Ten positions, 2 credits each. Participation in the editing and management of the McGill Law Journal as members of the Junior Board, through which students obtain practical experience in critically reviewing, editing, and participating in the genesis of scholarly writing. Students must have completed a minimum of two terms in the Faculty, and must obtain the permission of the Dean or Dean's delegate. Note that the numbers of positions are limited.
WRIT 330D1 McGill Law Journal-Electronics Editor.
(1.5) Responsible for maintaining Journal's website. Selecting and updating content of Internet Law Library and electronic Archives.
WRIT 330D1 (1.5), WRIT 330D2 (1.5) McGill Law Journal-Electronics Editor.
(Students must register for both WRIT 330D1 and WRIT 330D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 330D1 and WRIT 330D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Responsible for maintaining Journal's website. Selecting and updating content of Internet Law Library and electronic Archives.
WRIT 331D1 (2), WRIT 331D2 (2) McGill Law Journal-Citations Editor.
(Students must register for both WRIT 331D1 and WRIT 331D2.) (No credit will be given for this course unless both WRIT 331D1 and WRIT 331D2 are successfully completed in consecutive terms) Under supervision of the Executive, this editor will manage production of the revision of the Canadian Guide to Uniform Legal Citation. Offered only in revision years.

5.3 Credit Equivalences Granted for Activity Outside the Faculty

Credit Equivalences Granted for Activity Outside the Faculty

A limited number of the credits required for the McGill programme may be obtained in appropriate courses given by other faculties of McGill University or other universities, as arranged from time to time, provided the approval of the Dean or the Dean's delegate has been granted prior to registration. For students who enter the Faculty in 2004-2005, the total number of credits that may be allowed under this regulation shall not exceed six.

For students who entered the Faculty prior to 2004-2005, the total number of credits that may be allowed under this regulation shall not exceed twelve. The grades obtained in a course taken at a university other than McGill are not computed in a student's average. Non-law credits are not considered for the purpose of awarding Law Faculty prizes and scholarships, and for the purpose of calculating class ranking.

5.4 Course Concentrations

Several courses of instruction may be grouped by reason of fact that they treat a common subject matter or theme. The following unofficial groupings of courses regularly offered in the Faculty are intended to assist students desiring to specialize in selecting elective courses. They do not represent any academic policy decision by the Faculty as to the appropriate characterization of individual offerings. Moreover, some courses appear in more than one grouping. In all cases reference should be made to the detailed course descriptions appearing in this Calendar.

1. Basic Private Law
Civil Law
Civil Law Property (PRV1 144D1/D2)
Contractual Obligations (LAWG 100D1/D2)
Extra-Contractual Obligations/Torts (LAWG 101D1/D2)
Common Law
Common Law Property (PRV4 144)
Contractual Obligations (LAWG 100D1/D2)
Extra-Contractual Obligations/Torts (LAWG 101D1/D2)
2. Advanced Private Law
Civil Law
Advanced Civil Law Obligations (PROC 200)
Children and the Law (PRV2 456)
Employment Law (LEEL 470)
Insurance (BUS2 461)
Labour Law (LEEL 369)
Law of Persons (PRV2 270)
Lease, Enterprise, Suretyship (PROC 349)
Sale (LAWG 200)
Secured Transactions (LAWG 400)
Successions (PRV1 255)
Common Law
Advanced Common Law Obligations (PRV3 200)
Advanced Torts (PRV5 182)
Equity and Trusts (PRV4 449)
Limited Interests in Land (PRV4 148)
Real Estate Transactions (PRV4 451)
Remedies (PRV3 434)
Restitution (PRV4 435)
Sale (LAWG 200)
Secured Transactions (LAWG 400)
Wills and Estates (PRV4 456)
National Private Law
Banking and Negotiable Instruments (BUS2 465)
Complex Legal Transactions 1 (LAWG 500)
Complex Legal Transactions 2 (LAWG 501)
Consumer Law (PRV5 483)
Family Law (LAWG 273)
Introductory Legal Research (PRAC 147D1/D2)
Private International Law (LAWG 316)
3. Legal Theory, Legal Traditions and Legal History
Aboriginal Peoples and the Law (CMPL 500)
Advanced Jurisprudence (CMPL 505)
Canadian Legal History (CMPL 547)
Canon Law (CMPL 502)
Comparative Civil Liability (CMPL 550)
Comparative Legal Institutions (CMPL 517)
Comparative Modern Legal History (CMPL 519)
Contemporary Private Law Problems 1 (CMPL 557)
Contemporary Private Law Problems 2 (CMPL 558)
Feminist Legal Theory (CMPL 504)
Foundations (PUB3 116D1/D2)
Jurisprudence (CMPL 501)
Legal Theory (CMPL 506)
Linguistic and Literary Approaches to Law (CMPL 507)
Roman Law (CMPL 510)
Talmudic Law (CMPL 513)
Theories of Justice (CMPL 512)
4. Human Rights and Cultural Diversity
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (PUB3 115)
Civil Liberties (CMPL 573)
Comparative Constitutional Protection Human Rights (CMPL 556)
Protection of Minorities' Rights (CMPL 570)
Discrimination and the Law (CMPL 575)
International Human Rights Internship (WRIT 020)
International Law of Human Rights (CMPL 571)
Social Diversity and Law (CMPL 511)
5. Social Law
Employment Law (LEEL 470)
Immigration and Refugee Law (PUB2 451)
Labour Law (LEEL 369)
Land Use Planning (PRV4 145)
Law and Poverty (LEEL 482)
Law and Psychiatry (PUB2 419)
6. Law of the State
The Administrative Process (PUB2 400)
Comparative Federalism (PUB2 450)
Constitutional Law (PUB2 101D1/D2)
Constitutional Law of the United States (PUB2 102)
Judicial Review of Administrative Action (PUB2 401)
Municipal Law (PUB2 403)
Policies, Politics and Legislative Process (CMPL 518)
Problems in Constitutional Law (PUB2 202)
Statute Law (PUB2 402)
7. Regulation, Technology and Society
Communications Law (CMPL 577)
Computers and the Law (CMPL 578)
Comparative Medical Law (CMPL 551)
Copyright and Trademark Theory (BUS2 500)
Current Problems of International Legal Order (CMPL 579)
Entertainment Law (CMPL 524)
Environment and the Law (CMPL 580)
Government Control of Business (CMPL 574)
Intellectual and Industrial Property (BUS2 463)
Patent Theory and Policy (BUS2 501)
Science Technology and Law (CMPL 576)
8. Corporate Law and Taxation
Bankruptcy and Insolvency (BUS1 435)
Business Associations (BUS2 365)
Business Organizations (BUS2 367)
Corporate Finance (BUS2 464)
Corporate Taxation (PUB2 417)
Estate Planning (BUS1 414)
International Taxation (CMPL 539)
Securities Regulation (BUS2 372)
Tax Policy (PUB2 415)
Taxation (PUB2 313)
9. International Business Law
European Community Law 1 (CMPL 536)
European Community Law 2 (CMPL 537)
International Business Enterprises (CMPL 541)
International Carriage of Goods by Sea (CMPL 515)
International and Domestic Documentary Sales (CMPL 544)
International Development Law (CMPL 516)
International Maritime Conventions (CMPL 533)
Law and Practice of International Trade (CMPL 543)
International Securities Markets (CMPL 545)
Resolution of International Disputes (CMPL 533)
10. Public International Law
Current Problems of International Legal Order (CMPL 579)
International Environmental Law (CMPL 546)
International Human Rights Internship (WRIT 020)
International Humanitarian Law (CMPL 565)
International Law of Human Rights (CMPL 571)
The Law of International Organization (PUB2 406)
Law of the Sea (PUB3 438)
Public International Law (PUB2 105)
11. Criminal Law
Advanced Criminal Law (PUB2 421)
Comparative Criminal Procedure (PUB2 423)
Criminal Law (PUB2 111)
International Criminal Law (PUB2 425)
Sentencing in Canadian Law (PUB2 424)
12. Advocacy and the Legal Profession
Civil Litigation Workshop (PROC 459)
Comparative Criminal Procedure (PUB2 423)
Criminal Procedure (PUB2 422)
Evidence (Civil Matters) (LAWG 415)
Evidence (Criminal Matters) (LAWG 416)
Judicial Institutions and Civil Procedure (PROC 124)
Legal Professions and Ethics (PUB3 424)
Legal Writing, Mooting and Advanced Legal Research
(PRAC 155D1/D2)
Trial Advocacy (PUB2 420)

6 Library, Endowment Funds and Special Projects

6.1 Nahum Gelber Law Library

The Nahum Gelber Law Library, opened in 1998, is a state-of-the-art facility with a collection of over 170,000 volumes of statutes, regulations, law reports, treatises, journals, and other legal material. In addition to Canadian law, the collection focuses on air and space law, comparative law, private and public international law, human rights law, jurisprudence and international trade law. It also has legal materials from other jurisdictions such as Great Britain, France and the United States. The Peter Marshall Laing Special Collections Room houses the Wainwright Collection of French law from the ancien régime and other rare books. Other collections of note include an extensive collection of French legal theses and the John Humphrey United Nations Collection. The Dobrin-Steinberg Computer Instruction Classroom, when not in use for teaching, may be used by law students for personal research. In addition, there is wireless network access throughout the building as well as over 300 wired workspaces allowing students to use personal laptop computers to access digitized information. There are also six Moot Team Preparation Rooms for the exclusive use of competitive moot teams and three group study rooms for use by McGill students.

Wainwright Collection

The Wainwright Collection, comprising the personal library of the French legal historian Olivier Martin, was presented to the Faculty in 1959 by the late Arnold Wainwright, Q.C. It contains the world's finest university collection of legal works relating to Ancient Régime (France).

A.H. Mettarlin Endowment

In 1987 the Law Library received a legacy of $375,000 from the estate of Aaron H. Mettarlin, B.C.L.(1926), a leading notary in Montreal for over fifty years. The Mettarlin Endowment is used to purchase books and serials relating to the basic undergraduate collection in the Law Library.

John P. Humphrey United Nations Collection Endowment

In 2003 the Law Library received a legacy of $330,000 from the estate of John Peters Humphrey, B.Comm.(1925), B.A.(1927), B.C.L.(1929), PhD.(1945). The endowment is to purchase material on the United Nations, with a special emphasis on Human Rights.

Alan Aylesworth Macnaughton Collection of Canadian Legal Materials

The late Senator Alan A. Macnaughton created an endowment for the McGill Law Library, the income to be used to buy legal materials. Senator Macnaughton was a Speaker of the House of Commons, Founder and Honorary Chairman of the Canadian World Wildlife Fund, Counsel at Martineau Walker, and a member of the Faculty of Law Advisory Board.

Other Library Endowments

Annual gifts from graduates and friends of the Faculty contribute significantly to the development of the library collections. For example, as a 25th Anniversary Project the Class of 1969 raised funds to substantially expand the Library's CD-ROM network capabilities providing greater access to a variety of information in electronic form. In addition, the Library has received a number of special endowments over the years which include such funds as the F. R. Scott Endowment in Constitutional Law, the International Law Endowment Fund, the Law Library Serials Endowment, and the Joel King Fund for Jewish Law.

6.2 Wainwright Trust

The Wainwright Trust was established in 1973 from a legacy to the Faculty by Arnold Wainwright, Q.C. (1879-1967), B.A.(1899), B.C.L.(1902), D.C.L.(1963).

This eminent Canadian advocate, who practised for over fifty years at the Bar of the Province of Quebec, had a long association with legal studies at McGill University. He obtained his Bachelor of Civil Law degree in 1902 and was awarded the Elizabeth Torrance Gold Medal and the Macdonald Travelling Scholarship. In 1909 he joined the teaching staff of the Faculty as a part-time Lecturer in Civil Law; in 1921 he was promoted to the rank of Professor. His merits as a teacher of the Civil Law for over twenty-five years were recognized by the University in 1934 when it named him, upon his retirement, Emeritus Professor. The degree of Doctor of Civil Law honoris causa was conferred upon him in 1963.

The bequest of the residue of his estate, now valued at over $1,000,000, to McGill University for the use of the Faculty of Law made possible the founding of undergraduate scholarships in law, the enrichment of the Law Library, the creation of the Wainwright Fellowships, and the inauguration of the Wainwright Lectures. These have been organized to promote the scholarly study of law and, in particular, the Civil Law of Quebec, which always remained, throughout his long and distinguished career, the abiding interest of this generous friend and much valued colleague of the McGill Faculty of Law.

Wainwright Fellowships

Since the establishment of the Wainwright Trust the Faculty has appointed a number of Wainwright Junior Fellows, many of whom are now holding professorial positions in Canadian law faculties. In 1986 the Faculty welcomed its first Wainwright Senior Research Fellow, the Honourable Albert Mayrand, retired Justice of the Quebec Court of Appeal.

Wainwright Research Grants

Each year, the Wainwright Trustees grant research funds to McGill professors for the purpose of hiring McGill law students as research assistants in the field of Civil Law.

Wainwright Lectures

Commencing in 1975 the Wainwright Trust has sponsored a series of scholarly lectures on the Civil Law. Wainwright lecturers have been Mr. Justice Albert Mayrand, Professor Joseph Dainow, Professor Henri Battifol, Professor A.J. McClean, Professor Christian Atias, Professor Philippe Jestaz and Professor Alain-François Bisson. Published lectures have included Justice Mayrand's L'inviolabilité de la personne humaine, Professor McClean's The Quebec Trust: Role Rich and Principle Poor, and Professor Atias' Premiers regards sur la culture juridique québécoise.

6.3 Boulton Trust

The bequest of the residue of the estate of the late A. Maxwell Boulton, Q.C. (1909-1981), B.A.(1930), B.C.L.(1933) to McGill University permitted the creation of the Boulton Junior Fellowships and the Boulton Visiting Professors Programme. Boulton Fellows are junior scholars trained primarily in the Civil or Common Law traditions who wish to gain some experience in law teaching while pursuing a major research project or completing a higher degree in law. Boulton Visiting Professors are senior scholars invited from time to time to McGill to offer a course or seminar on topics related to their particular specialties and to pursue their ongoing research.

To date the Faculty has welcomed Boulton Junior Fellows from the United Kingdom, France, Australia, Japan, China and Canada. Former Fellows are now teaching law on three continents.

6.4 International Human Rights Law Trust

The Human Rights Law Trust was established in 1987 as the umbrella under which several human rights endowments are administered. These endowments include the Gordon Echenberg Fund which sustains the annual Natan Scharansky Lecture in Human Rights, the Raoul Wallenberg Fund which sustains the annual Raoul Wallenberg Lecture in Human Rights, the John P. Humphrey Fund which sustains the annual John P. Humphrey Lecture in International Human Rights Law, and the René Cassin Fund which sustains the annual René Cassin Lectureship in Human Rights.

The International Human Rights Law Trust also assists in sponsoring an Annual Conference dealing with a contemporary issue in Human Rights Law.

Finally the International Human Rights Law Trust, in cooperation with the independent advocacy organization, InterAmicus, administers the Robert S. Litvack Fund which finances an annual award in recognition of an individual who has made a significant contribution to the rule of Law.

6.5 Other Faculty Endowments and Annual Funds

The programmes of the Faculty are also supported by several other endowments. The J.C. Wurtele Fund, established in 1929 from a legacy by the Honourable J.C. Wurtele, is used to assist in the publication of English language civil law monographs. The Fern Gertrude Kennedy Jurisprudence Fund, established in 1987 is used to sponsor guest lectures in the field of Jurisprudence, to purchase books on legal theory and otherwise to assist in the promotion of jurisprudence within the Faculty. Finally, in 1989 the McGill International Law and Practice Fund was created to promote the study of international trade and business law through the acquisition of library materials, the sponsorship of colloquia and research projects.

Tory, Tory, Deslauriers & Binnington Programme for Legal Research And Writing

This fund was established in 1989 by the firm Tory, Tory, DesLauriers & Binnington to promote legal research and writing within the Faculty of Law. The programme currently comprises two features: a summer fellowship programme and a legal writing award.

The Summer Fellowship permits two students to spend half a summer with the law firm in Toronto as part of the summer students programme and the other half of the summer as research assistants within the Faculty of Law. Students selected for the Summer Fellowship Programme are expected, while at the Faculty, to produce research work of publishable quality in support of an ongoing project of a member of the academic staff.

The J.S.D. Tory Writing Awards, which permit students to revise term essays for publication, are explained more fully in section 16.3 "Undergraduate Scholarships, Prizes and Student Aid for Graduating Students".

Alma Mater Fund

Each year alumni and alumnae support various faculty projects through their contributions to the Alma Mater Fund. In recent years the fund has assisted with several projects, including the purchase of computers in the Library, the refurnishing of the student common room, the acquisition and reproduction of class photos and the hiring of students as summer research assistants.

6.6 Meredith Memorial Lectures

In 1949 the Faculty of Law of McGill University began its sponsorship of a series of lectures known as the Bar Extension Lectures. These were designed to assist in the promotion of continuing legal education for members of the legal profession in the Montreal area. A variety of topics of current interest both to the members of the Bar and the notarial profession have been offered annually since that time. Since 1961 the lectures have been published as The Meredith Memorial Lectures in honour of the late W.C.J. Meredith, Q.C., Dean of the Faculty of Law of McGill University from 1950-1960. The proceeds of the Lectures sustain the W.C.J. Meredith Research Fund of the Faculty of Law.

6.7 Visiting Judges Programme

Each year the Faculty also hosts a visit by a prominent member of the judiciary who spends time at McGill. Past visiting judges include Mr. Justice Roger Kerans of the Alberta Court of Appeal, Mr. Justice Amédée Monet and Mr. Justice Melvin Rothman of the Quebec Court of Appeal, Mr. Justice Sidney Schwartz of the Court of Queen's Bench of Manitoba, Mr. Justice Brian Sully of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, Madam Justice Nicole Duval Hesler, Mr. Justice Benjamin Greenberg, Mr. Justice Derek Guthrie, and Mr. Justice Pierre Boudreault of the Superior Court of Quebec, and Mr. Justice Peter Heerey and Mr. Justice Ronald Sackville of the Federal Court of Australia.

6.8 Endowed Lectures

In addition to the Boulton and Wainwright Lectures, the Faculty hosts two alumni lectures each year. Endowments from the Class of '75 and the Class of '77 on their 10th anniversary reunions fund public lectures by leading scholars each term. The inaugural Class of '75 Lecture was delivered in 1987 by Paul Craig of Oxford, and the initial Class of `77 Lecture was delivered in 1988 by Martha Minow of Harvard. The Alan Aylesworth Macnaughton Lecture Sponsorship Fund sponsors, at least once every two years, a lecture on a subject of general interest to the public or student body. This fund was endowed thanks to a gift from Alan A. Macnaughton, Q.C., B.A. '26, B.C.L. '29, LL.D. '92.

6.9 International Human Rights Law Programme

The International Human Rights Law Programme seeks to continue the legacy of former McGill professors and deans Percy Corbett, John Humphrey, F. R. Scott and Maxwell Cohen. Its goal is to provide focus to research and scholarship in Human Rights Law at the Faculty through a network of teaching, course concentration, research, publication, advocacy training, public education, seminars, public lectures and symposia, and the graduate programme in human rights law.

The Programme co-sponsors, with the private advocacy group InterAmicus, four Annual Human Rights Lectureships of international reputation. The Lectureships honour persons who have shown by word and deed how one person can make a difference, and are given by individuals who have helped to advance the cause of human rights and human dignity. Lectures have included Natan Sharansky, who inaugurated the Lectureship in his name; John Humphrey, who inaugurated the John Humphrey Lectureship in Human Rights on the eve of the 40th Anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; Nobel Peace Laureate Elie Wiesel, who inaugurated the Raoul Wallenberg Lectureship in Human Rights; and Madame Justice Claire L'Heureux-Dubé of the Supreme Court of Canada who inaugurated the René Cassin Lectureship in Human Rights. The distinguished lecturers who have given one or other of the lectureships include Father Robert Drinan, S.J., Samuel Pisar, the Honourable Walter Tarnopolsky of the Ontario Court of Appeal, His Excellency Javier Perez de Cuellar and Professor Alan M. Dershowitz of Harvard Law School.

6.10 McGill Law Journal/Revue de droit de McGill

The McGill Law Journal/Revue de droit de McGill, founded in 1952, is a professional journal published by students of the Faculty of Law of McGill University. Its purpose is to promote the study of the law in Canada and to help in the understanding of the civil law and common law systems. It publishes articles in either French or English.

The Journal also publishes the Canadian Guide to Legal Citation which has been adopted by many leading legal periodicals in several countries. Each year it also organizes the McGill Law Journal Alumni Lecture. Both these activities are sustained through the McGill Law Journal Trust.

6.11 Moot Court Programme

The Moot Court programme is organized under Faculty supervision by upper year students. It oversees the Faculty's optional Appellate Advocacy and Competitive Mooting Programmes.

In 1979, the Montreal law firm of Ahern, Nuss and Drymer, in memory of its distinguished founder, John Gerard Ahern, Q.C., B.C.L.(1918), who achieved during his long career at the Bar the reputation of being an outstanding advocate and who served as Bâtonnier of the Bar of Montreal and Quebec in 1955-56, established the John G. Ahern, Q.C. Memorial Mooting Fund. The S. Leon Mendelsohn Mooting Fund established in honour of S. Leon Mendelsohn, Q.C., B.C.L. '24, a member of the Montreal Bar since 1924, by his partners at Mendelsohn Rosentzveig Shacter. This fund provides financial assistance to moot competition team members representing McGill. The Richard & Hilda Golick Mooting Sponsorship, established in 1994 and funded by the proceeds from the Law and You Seminars, provides financial assistance to Moot Competition team members representing McGill University. These funds, administered by the Dean of the Faculty of Law, in consultation with mooting advisers, have been set up to assist law students in their mooting activities and, in particular, participation in competitive moots.

Under the supervision of members of Faculty, students may participate in a variety of mooting competitions. McGill regularly sends teams to the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot, the Tribunal-École Pierre-Basile Mignault, the Concours Charles Rousseau, the Quebec Bar Prize Moot, the Gale Cup Moot, the Laskin Moot Court Competition, the Corporate Securities Moot Competition, the Wilson Moot, the Kawaskimhon Aboriginal Moot, the Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot and the Sopinka Cup. The Faculty has frequently won several of these Mooting Competitions.

6.12 Legal Methodology Teaching Groups

Third and fourth year students may apply to serve as student tutors in the Faculty's tutorial programmes in which first year or second year students are divided into groups for carrying out written and oral assignments in legal research, citation, legal writing, and advocacy. Each student tutor works under the supervision of an individual member of the professorial staff who is assigned to the programme.

6.13 Legal Theory Programme

In 1986 the Faculty established a Legal Theory Programme consolidating several formerly independent programmes under which visiting scholars were invited to McGill. Since then other facets of the Programme have developed so that it is now a comprehensive bilingual and multi-traditional visiting scholars programme.

6.14 Visiting Scholars Programme

The visiting scholars programme dates from 1982 and under it, several distinguished legal scholars are invited to spend a few days at McGill. These scholars participate in the intellectual life of the Faculty and present at least one major address. Recent visitors from leading Canadian, American, English and French law faculties have included Professors Ernest Weinrib of the University of Toronto; Alain Prujiner of Laval; Sally Falk Moore of Harvard; Joseph Vining of Michigan; Robert Gordon of Stanford; Duncan Kennedy of Harvard; Brian Simpson, Joseph Raz, Bernard Rudden and Paul Craig of Oxford; George Fletcher of Columbia; Jeremy Waldron of Berkeley; Gareth Jones of Cambridge; and Philippe Rémy of Poitiers.

6.15 Legal Theory Workshops and McGill Lecture in Jurisprudence and Public Policy

The Legal Theory Workshop Series brings leading scholars to the Faculty throughout the teaching year to present work-in-progress. Latterly, the Faculty has hosted Professors Christopher Stone of the University of Southern California, Martha Minow of Harvard, Cass Sunstein of Chicago, Richard Epstein of Chicago, Simone Goyard-Fabre of Paris, Owen Fiss of Yale, Drucilla Cornell of Rutgers, Jean Bethke Elshtain of Chicago. In 1994, the Faculty inaugurated the McGill Lecture in Jurisprudence and Public Policy. The first two distinguished speakers were Professor Ronald Dworkin and Professor Luc Ferry.

6.16 Annie Macdonald Langstaff Workshops

The Annie Macdonald Langstaff Workshops were inaugurated in 1988. Named in honour of Annie Macdonald Langstaff, B.C.L. (1914), the first woman law graduate at McGill, who was denied the right to practice in Quebec because of her gender, the workshops provide a forum for scholarly research and practical insights on social justice issues. Recent speakers have included: Patricia Monture-Angus of the University of Saskatchewan,
Marie-France Bich of University of Montreal, Kendall Thomas of Columbia Law School, Hilary Charlesworth of Australian National University, Homar Hoodfar of Concordia University, Ronald McCallum of Sydney University, Susan Boyd of the University of British Columbia and Denise Reaume of the University of Toronto.

Family, friends and colleagues, through their donations, created the Margot E. Halpenny Memorial Endowment to sponsor one Annie Macdonald Langstaff Workshop every year at the Faculty. Margot Halpenny, B.A. '72, LL.B. '76, died in 1991.

6.17 International Business Law Programme

The International Business Law Programme was established in 1977. Its major components are a research programme directed through the Institute of Comparative Law and a graduate programme in International Business Law which attracts each year 25 students to the Faculty's LL.M. Programme. The programme is funded in part by the International Business Law Programme Development Fund and by the McGill International Law and Practice Fund. Together these funds support fellowships, the acquisition of library materials in this field, and visits by leading scholars. The programme has sponsored two colloquia on the Free-Trade Agreement and is producing research papers on various aspects of the international trade system.

7 Student Activities and Services

7.1 Law Students Association/
Association des étudiants en droit

The Law Students Association, founded before World War I and known for many years as the Law Undergraduate Society, is composed of all students in the Faculty of Law pursuing the B.C.L./ LL.B. degrees. The LSA Council, which represents the views and interests of the students in the Faculty, is made up of nine executive members, the class presidents, the four Faculty Council student members-at-large and the Law Senator.

In addition to representing its constituents within the Faculty, the LSA/AED is responsible for promoting law student interests outside the Faculty in conjunction with other university, provincial and national student organizations. The LSA/AED oversees a number of functions and activities affecting the students of the Faculty. Through its various committees, the LSA/AED oversees social events, sports (including participation in the Canada Law Games), orientation activities, the planning of Graduation activities, the production of the Yearbook, and the Computer Resources for students.

The LSA also actively promotes social justice and advances the causes of minority groups within the Faculty.

The LSA/AED offices are located in Room 2 of Old Chancellor Day Hall. For further information call (514) 398-6966.

Given below is a list of active student organizations. For more information about student activities please check our Web site at www.law.mcgill.ca/students.

Aboriginal Law Student Association
Amnesty International Legal Network Action Group
Asian Law Students Association
Association of Trial Lawyers of America
Black Law Students' Caucus
Canadian Lawyers Association for International Human Rights
Children, Youth and the Law
Environmental Law Association of McGill/
Association de droit de l'environnement de McGill
Epicureans Club
Forum National
Green Party Students Group
International Law Society
Labour and Employment Law Society
Law Students with Disabilities
Lawyers for Social Responsibility/
Juristes pour la Paix et la Sécurité
LEGALE McGill OutLaw
(Les Étudiants Gais et Lesbiennes de McGill)
Liberal-McGill Law Students Committee/
Comité des étudiants libéraux en droit de McGill
McGill Alternative Dispute Resolution Conferences
McGill Business Law Club
McGill Faculty of Law Legal Activist Society
McGill Jewish Law Students Association
Phi Delta Phi
Pro Bono Students Canada/
Programme Canadien pro bono pour étudiants et étudiantes
Tela Club
Thomas More Society
Women and the Law

7.2 Law Student Services

LSA Computer Advisory Committee

The LSA Computer Advisory Committee is responsible for administering the student-funded Computer Labs at the Faculty of Law in conjunction with the Faculty. The committee is comprised of three student representatives (including a member of the LSA executive) and of two Faculty members. The Committee provides for the technical support, maintenance, upgrading and printing services of the LSA Computer Labs. The Committee also takes responsibility for the Electronic Mail System and Electronic Notice System within the Faculty. The Committee strives to maintain and improve student computer services at the lowest cost.

McGill Legal Information Clinic

The McGill Legal Information Clinic is a student-run service for the McGill University community. Law student staff provide legal counselling and information within the limits of the Quebec Bar Act. Only students who have completed first year are eligible to volunteer. For further information call (514) 398-6792 or visit the Clinic offices at Rooms B-20 and B-21, University Centre, 3480 McTavish Street.

Quid Novi

Quid Novi is the weekly newspaper of the McGill Faculty of Law. The Quid Novi is published and financially supported by students. It covers events and legal issues, both inside and outside the Faculty. Content ranges from wit and satire to investigative journalism, from poetry to front-page news stories, from political commentary to humorous contests.

Skit Nite

Skit Nite is an annual theatrical production produced and performed by law students. Comprising humorous vignettes of law school life and musical performances, the show has become the highlight of the Faculty social calendar. The primary purpose of the evening, however, is to raise money for local charities. Skit Nite donates every year over $20,000 to several Montreal charities.

7.3 Office of the Dean of Students

William and Mary Brown Student Services Building
3600 McTavish Street, Suite 4100
Montreal, QC  H3A 1Y2
Telephone:
General Information: (514) 398-8238 or 398-3825
Dean/Associate Dean: (514) 398-4990
Fax: (514) 398-3857

The Dean and the Associate Dean of Students coordinate all student services at McGill and are available to provide assistance and/or information on almost all aspects of non-academic student life. Concerns of an academic nature will be directed to the proper individual, office or department.

7.4 Student Services

Unless otherwide indicated, on the Downtown Campus all student services offered by the Office of the Dean of Students are located in the William and Mary Brown Student Services Building, 3600 McTavish Street, Montreal, Quebec,  H3A 1Y2.

A list of services available is given below. For further information refer to the Student Services Website: www.mcgill.ca/stuserv or the address indicated.

Athletics:
offers programs in recreational, intercollegiate, instructional, intramural and sports clubs.
Athletics Complex, 475 Pine Avenue West (514) 398-7000
E-mail: athletics@mcgill.ca
Website: www.athletics.mcgill.ca
Career and Placement Service (CAPS):
provides a range of services to McGill students, and recent graduates, in the field of student and graduate employment.
Brown Building, Suite 2200 (514) 398-3304
E-mail: careers.caps@mcgill.ca
Website: www.caps.mcgill.ca
Chaplaincy Service:
concerned with the spiritual and mental well-being of all students.
Brown Building, Suite 4400 (514) 398-4104
E-mail: chaplaincy@mcgill.ca
Counselling Service:
assistance for personal, social, and emotional problems as well as vocational and academic concerns.
Brown Building, Suite 4200 (514) 398-3601
E-mail: counselling.service@mcgill.ca
Website: www.mcgill.ca/stuserv/counselling
First Peoples' House:
fosters a sense of community for Aboriginal students studying at McGill.
3505 Peel Street (514) 398-3217
E-mail: firstpeopleshouse@mcgill.ca
Website: www.mcgill.ca/fph
First-Year Office:
helps ease the transition of all students new to McGill. Coordinates "Discover McGill", a one-day, campus-wide University and Faculty Orientation.
Brown Building, Suite 2100 (514) 398-6913
E-mail: firstyear@mcgill.ca
Website: www.mcgill.ca/stuserv/1styear/firstyr.htm
Health Service:
provides access to experienced physicans, nurses and health educators who offer health services and information in a confidential atmosphere. Also operates a laboratory offering a wide array of testing, and a dental clinic.
Brown Building, Suite 3300 (514) 398-6017
International Student Services:
offers support to international students on non-academic matters (immigration, health insurance, etc.), runs a Buddy Program and an orientation program.
Brown Building, Suite 3215 (514) 398-4349
E-mail: international.students@mcgill.ca
Mental Health Service:
a psychiatric clinic which offers easily accessible treatment for mental health problems.
Brown Building, Suite 5500 (514) 398-6019
Student (Financial) Aid Office:
provides assistance in the form of loans, bursaries, and work study programs to students requiring financial aid.
Brown Building, Suite 3200 (514) 398-6013 /6014 /6015
E-mail: student.aid@mcgill.ca
Student Housing (Off-Campus):
maintains computerized lists of available off-campus student housing.
Student Housing Office, 3641 University Street (514) 398-6010
E-mail: offcampus.housing@mcgill.ca
Website: www.mcgill.ca/offcampus
Residences:
offers accommodation for approximately 1 700 students.
Student Housing Office (514) 398-6368
Website: www.mcgill.ca/residences
Office for Students with Disabilities:
coordinates services to meet the special needs of students with disabilities.
Brown Building, Suite 3100 (514) 398-6009
E-mail: disabilities.students@mcgill.ca TDD: (514) 398-8198
Website: www.mcgill.ca/osd
Tutorial Service:
sponsors an extensive tutorial program for students.
Brown Building, Suite 4200 (514) 398-6011
E-mail: tutorial.service@mcgill.ca

7.5 Ombudsperson for Students

The position of Ombudsperson for Students is filled on a half-time basis by an academic staff member. The Ombudsperson receives complaints from students and assists in the resolution of those complaints through informal means including information, advice, intervention, and referrals with a view to avoiding the more formal grievance procedures that already exist in the University.
The Office of the Ombudsperson is a confidential, independent, and neutral dispute resolution service for all members of the student community. Please call (514) 398-7059 for an appointment.
Office of the Ombudsperson, Brown Building, Room 5202
Website: www.mcgill.ca/ombudsperson

7.6 Extra-curricular Activities

There are over 250 activities and clubs which students may join. These include international clubs; religious groups; political clubs; fraternities; communications groups such as Radio McGill, the McGill Tribune, and the McGill Daily; and some 50 miscellaneous groups (e.g., science clubs; literary, theatrical and musical societies; a chess club; and the McGill Outing Club).

The University Centre, 3480 McTavish Street, provides club rooms for these activities in a four-storey building with cafeterias, a ballroom, lounges and an experimental theatre. Activities for graduate students are centred in David Thomson House at 3650 McTavish Street. On the Macdonald Campus facilities are located in the Centennial Centre (refer to FAES section).

8 Faculty Governance and Academic Regulations

8.1 Faculty Council

As the delegate of the Senate of McGill University, the Faculty Council is the principal academic policy-making body within the Faculty of Law. It has either direct or advisory authority over all matters relating to undergraduate admissions, curriculum, examinations, graduate studies, library and staff appointments. The Faculty Council operates through a committee system and meets on average once per month during teaching terms.

Faculty Council is composed of all members of the full-time teaching staff and a number of undergraduate and graduate students sufficient to constitute one-fifth of its total membership. When considering the admission, evaluation and standing of students, and when dealing with the recruitment and terms of contract of members of the academic staff, the Faculty Council is composed solely of members of the full-time teaching staff.

8.2 Outline of Academic Regulations

Academic standing of students is determined under a credit system as set out in the Faculty Academic Regulations contained in the Faculty of Law Handbook. This Handbook, given to all students upon registration, contains the detailed Regulations for the McGill Programme. The Faculty is also governed by the University Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures.

The attention of students is particularly drawn to certain academic requirements. It should be noted that no candidates shall be eligible for degrees granted by the Faculty unless they complete the required number of credits for the same within five years of their first registration in first year, unless they have been granted a leave of absence by the Dean or the Dean's delegate (Regulation 5) or unless they have been granted permission to pursue their degrees on a part-time basis (Regulation 53).

Moreover, candidates are not permitted to be enrolled concurrently in the programmes of the Faculty of Law and a professional training programme of any Bar, whether this programme consists of a course of lectures or a period of articling (Regulation 4).

Further, full-time attendance at the Faculty obliges candidates to register for no fewer than twelve credits in each term, with the exception of their final term should a lesser number of credits be required for the obtaining of their degree (Regulation 3). Candidates shall not receive credit for any course taken in fulfilment of requirements for any other degree (Regulation 10).

The courses given in every case anticipate at least two hours of directed study for every hour of lecture. In addition, each candidate is obliged to write essays, to attend the seminars, to participate in the Legal Methodology Programme, and to fulfil whatever other requirements may be set by the Faculty. It is expected that candidates will devote their whole time to their legal studies and will not undertake other studies during the academic session without prior approval of the Dean or the Dean's delegate.

The Faculty generally follows the University Examination Regulations, and evaluates all students anonymously (Regulations 19 and 22). Examinations and other assignments may be written in either English or French. Examinations are set in the language in which a course is given, but may contain materials in either French or English (Regulation 20).

Students who have not succeeded in passing a session as set out below will be required to withdraw from the Faculty, subject to their right to apply for re-admission to the Faculty (Regulations 49 and 50).

8.3 Marking System and Degree Classifications

The Faculty employs a Grade Point scheme for calculating Academic Averages. Under this scheme, Grade Points are earned for letter grades obtained in courses. Term and cumulative grade point averages are used to determine academic standing. For detail, the Faculty's Handbook should be consulted. What follows is a short description of some of the relevant regulations. The table set out below correlates letter grades to Grade Points:

Letter Grade
Grade Points in Course
A
4.0
A-
3.7
B+
3.3
B
3.0
B-
2.7
C+
2.3
C
2.0
D
1.0
F
0.0

Successful completion of the degree programme, as well as final honours in the degree programme, are determined on the basis of the cumulative Grade Point Average.

The Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated by dividing the sum of the course credit times the grade points by the total course GPA credits. GPA credits are the credits of the courses with grades that are assigned grade points. This calculation is to exclude all courses in which the candidate obtained a P.

GPA = S (course credit x grade points)
S (GPA course credits)

Candidates who do not achieve a sessional GPA of 1.50 will be required to withdraw from the Faculty. Candidates who achieve a term GPA of between 1.50 and 1.99 will be permitted to continue their studies, but must achieve at the end of their subsequent session either a term GPA of 2.50 or a Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) of 2.00.

Candidates must have a CGPA of 2.00 in order to be entitled to graduate.

Honours in the Faculty are granted as follows:
Great Distinction: 3.30 CGPA
Distinction: 3.00 CGPA

8.4 Changes in Regulations

This Calendar and the Faculty Regulations in force govern students registered in the Faculty of Law during the 2004-05 academic year. Students are advised that they will be subject to changes made therein as published from time to time within the Faculty before the time of their fall registration.

These Regulations and all others under which the curriculum is administered are subject to change at any time.

9 Registration and Commencement of Classes

9.1 Commencement of Classes

In the 2004-05 academic year, lectures in all years will begin on Wednesday, September 1st.

9.2 Registration

New Students

All first-year students and all new students in the Faculty of Law must initiate registration on the Web by adding the registration course REGN-RCLW on Minerva at www.mcgill.ca/minerva. The registration period for new Law students for the 2004-05 academic year commences Tuesday, August 3, and ends Wednesday, September 1, 2004.

All first-year students and new students must present themselves at the Faculty of Law on Tuesday, August 31, 2004 to complete their registration. Welcoming of new students will follow registration.

Returning Students

At the end of the winter term students in upper years are required to register by Minerva indicating their course selections for the next academic year. This will be considered formal registration, replacing any further registration requirements. Refer to www.mcgill.ca/student-records to confirm the registration dates.

Late Registration

Students who fail to register during the normal registration period may do so within the period designated by the University for late registration. They will be assessed a late registration fee as listed below:

Returning Students:

may register late from Tuesday, August 3 until and including Wednesday, September 1 with the payment of a late registration fee of $50 ($20 for Special Students).

New and Returning Students (Fall):

Students may register late via Minerva from Thursday, September 2nd until Sunday, September 12th with the payment of a late registration fee of $100 ($40 for Special Students).

9.3 Course Nomenclature

Required Course:

Courses absolutely required in a program. All students in that program must take this (these) course(s) unless they are granted exemption(s).

Complementary Course:

Courses selected from a restricted list, a particular subject area, or a discipline. In some programs, students must include a number of these in order to meet program requirements.

Elective course:

courses chosen freely (sometimes with advice and approval of the departmental adviser).

9.4 Course Change Period

During the initial Registration Periods, students may make changes to their course registrations (add or drop courses), subject to the requirements and restrictions of their program and of individual courses.

The Course Change deadline coincides with the deadline for late registration. Please refer to the Calendar of DatesSee "CALENDAR OF DATES 2004-2005" on page 9.

Students who are registered in the Fall Term may continue to add and drop courses that will begin in the Winter Term throughout the Fall Term until the deadline for course change/late registration in the Winter Term.

After the Course Change deadline, courses may be added according to each faculty's regulations and only with written permission of the instructor and the Office of the Associate Dean of the student's Faculty. A fee will be charged for each course added.

9.5 Regulations Concerning Withdrawal

9.5.1 Course Withdrawal

Following the Course Change deadline there is a one-week period during which students may withdraw, with a grade of W and full refund of course fees, from courses that start in that term.

After the Withdrawal (with refund) deadline, there is a period during which withdrawal from a course will also result in a grade of W but no course fees will be refunded.

Courses that begin in the Fall Term

Deadline for withdrawal (grade of 'W') with refund: September 19, 2004

Deadlines for withdrawal (grade of 'W') without refund:

- Single-term courses: October 10, 2004

- Multi-term courses: January 16, 2005

Courses that begin in the Winter Term

Deadline for withdrawal (grade of 'W') with refund: January 23, 2005

Deadline for withdrawal (grade of 'W') without refund:

- Single term courses: February 13, 2005

- Multi-term courses: May 15, 2005*

*Please note that students in multi-term courses with course numbers ending in N1 and N2 (begin in the winter, skip the summer, are completed in the subsequent Fall Term) may withdraw after May 15 and until the end of the Fall Term course change period by contacting their Faculty Student Affairs Office.

After the withdrawal (without refund) deadline, but before the end of term, the student may, under exceptional circumstances, be granted permission to withdraw from a course. (Permission will not be granted merely because a student is doing unsatisfactory work.) A grade of W or WF, as appropriate, will appear on the transcript but will not be calculated in the GPA. For further information students should consult their faculty Student Affairs Office.

Note:
1. Students who wish to withdraw from certain courses after the Course Change period must consult their Student Affairs Office for information on procedures.
2. The responsibility for initiating withdrawal rests solely with the student. Neither notification of the course instructor nor discontinuance of class attendance will suffice. The date on which a student's withdrawal is entered on Minerva is the official date of withdrawal, even if the student stopped attending lectures earlier.
3. Fee refunds, if any, will be in accordance with section 13.7 "Fees and Withdrawal from the University".
9.5.2 University Withdrawal

Students considering University withdrawal are strongly urged to consult with their adviser and Student Affairs Office before making a final decision.

Student's responsibility

The responsibility for initiating University withdrawal rests solely with the student. Neither notification of the course instructor nor discontinuance of class attendance will suffice. The date on which a student drops or withdraws from all courses on Minerva or the date the request for withdrawal is submitted to the Student Affairs Office is the official date of withdrawal, even if the student stopped attending lectures earlier.

Deadlines for University Withdrawal

All students who have accessed Minerva to register must officially withdraw within deadlines if they decide not to attend the Term(s) for which they have registered. See Withdrawal (W) deadline dates in the Calendar of Dates.

Students who decide to withdraw from the University are required to follow the following procedures:
Before the deadlines for Course Withdrawal
Students who wish to withdraw from the University before the deadlines for course withdrawal must drop or withdraw from all courses that can be dropped or withdrawn from on Minerva.
After the deadlines for Course Withdrawal
Students who are blocked from dropping or withdrawing from their last course on Minerva are required to contact their Student Affairs Office. The Student Affairs Office will supply any forms necessary to complete the University withdrawal where the deadline for University withdrawal has not been passed.
Consequences of University Withdrawal

Fee refunds, if any, for the term in which the student withdraws will be in accordance with section 13.7 "Fees and Withdrawal from the University".

Upon withdrawal, students are required to return their ID card to the University as stated in section 10.3 "Identification (ID) Cards".

Students who withdraw from the University and wish to re-enroll in a subsequent term must follow the procedures for re-admission, section 3.5 "Admissions Procedure".

Students who withdraw during the Fall Term are considered withdrawn from the entire academic year, regardless of whether Winter Term courses are dropped. If they wish to return for the Winter Term, they must follow the procedures for re-admission.

9.6 Minerva

Minerva is McGill's Web-based information system serving students, staff and faculty. Students view class schedules, including course descriptions and spaces available in course sections, register and make course changes using Minerva at www.mcgill.ca/minerva. Students can also view their unofficial transcript and fee information; update their own personal information such as address, telephone number and emergency contacts; for some faculties, change their major or minor; apply to graduate; and view their McGill log-on information to access the Internet and e-mail.

9.7 Changes to Student Records after Normal Deadlines

Students are permitted to make record changes, such as course add/drop, course withdrawal, etc., at given times during each term. If a student is not able to make a change during the required period, he or she must follow the procedures described under the section relating to that change.

Students must also be aware that faculties have deadlines after which they can no longer consider any special student record requests for a given term. These deadlines are set by the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office (ARR), and the procedures that must be followed are described in the following two sections.

9.7.1 Fee-related Changes

Changes that would alter a student's citizenship and/or immigration status, and therefore the level of tuition they are required to pay, are dealt with in section 10.2.1 "Documentation for Permanent Code, Citizenship and Proof of Quebec Residency".

This section deals with other changes that affect fees or government reporting, such as:

· Adding/Deleting a Term
· Adding/Deleting a Course
· University Withdrawal with a refund
· Grade of a "W" with a refund
· Changing a Thesis program to Non-thesis, and vice versa
· Including/excluding a course as part of a program

Such fee-related changes to students' records, if approved by the student's faculty, are to be completed by the dates given below.

The faculties have until these dates to make the changes. Any changes that require ARR action must be submitted in advance of these dates:
Fall Term - January 31,
Winter Term - June 15,
Summer Term - September 30.

A change that affects fees that is requested after the dates given above will not normally be considered. In situations where there are "extraordinary personal" or "extraordinary academic" circumstances that could not have been foreseen prior to these deadlines, students may formally request an extension of the deadline from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office. The Associate Dean of the faculty concerned will be required to provide the ARR with all available documentation relating to the student's request. The ARR, upon consultation with the Student Accounts Office if necessary, will decide whether or not to consider the request and will so advise the faculty or department in writing. If the request is accepted for consideration, once the final decision has been rendered, the student and the faculty will be informed of the result by the ARR. In the instance where a request is approved, the ARR will also inform the student and the faculty of the date the change will take effect.

9.7.2 Non Fee-related Changes

Examples of non fee-related changes are:

· Grade changes (excluding "W" grade with a refund)
· University Withdrawal without a refund
· Adding/modifying comments that appear on the transcript

Non fee-related changes to students' records are to be completed by the dates given below.

The faculties have until the dates specified below to make changes. Any changes that require ARR action must be submitted in advance of these dates:
Fall Term - January 31,
Winter Term - June 15,
Summer Term - September 30.

For non fee-related changes after the above deadlines, the student must make a request in writing to the Associate Dean of their faculty, clearly explaining the reasons why the change could not have been requested prior to these dates. The Associate Dean would then review the request and render a decision. If permitted, the change would then be processed according to existing Faculty and Student Record procedures.

9.8 Class Schedule

The Class Schedule for the upcoming Fall and Winter Terms normally becomes available in mid-March at www.mcgill.ca/courses. (The Summer Term schedule is normally made available in January).

The Class Schedule includes the days and times when courses are offered, class locations, names of instructors, and informational remarks and comments. Descriptions of scheduled courses can be accessed by clicking on the CRN (course reference number) that appears with each course section shown.

Students should make special note of any pre-registration requirements for a course, such as placement tests, or departmental approval/permission required.

Class Schedule information is subject to change and is updated as courses are added, cancelled, rescheduled or relocated.

It is the responsibility of all students to consult the Class Schedule at the time of registration, and again before classes begin, to ensure that changes have not resulted in conflicts in their schedule.

10 Personal Information

10.1 Updating Personal Information

It is important that all students keep their official records up to date, especially their mailing or student billing address as these are used by the University year round. If all addresses on file are invalid or incomplete, a student's mail will be held. Once the addresses are updated, future mail will be sent.

Students should update their addresses and/or telephone number using Minerva.

Students who are away from campus and do not have access to the Internet may make the changes by writing to the Student Affairs Office or to the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office. A written request must include the student's signature.

Changes requiring verification of official documents, e.g., change of name or citizenship or correction of birth date, must be reported to the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office as soon as possible. Such changes can only be made in person.

10.2 Documentation

10.2.1 Documentation for Permanent Code, Citizenship and Proof of Quebec Residency

The Ministry of Education in Quebec requires that McGill collect documentation from all students to ensure tuition fees are assessed correctly and to ensure a permanent code is issued by the Ministry for all students. Canadian citizens and Permanent Residents should take steps to mail or fax this documentation prior to arriving on campus. International students must bring the appropriate documents with them when they come to have their McGill identification card issued before the start of lectures.

10.2.2 Canadians or Permanent Residents of Canada

Any new student who is a Canadian or Permanent Resident, including Quebec residents, must mail or fax to McGill prior to arriving on campus:

a. a legible photocopy of one of the following:

· Certificate of Indian status card
· Canadian birth certificate
· Canadian citizenship card (both sides)
· Record of Permanent Resident status in Canada (i.e. IMM1000 document/IMM 5292 and PR card - both sides)

and

b. if the information was not already provided at the time of application to McGill, a signed Permanent Code form available at www.mcgill.ca/student-records/fees/permcode, indicating the names of the student's father and mother, or a Permanent Code.

Students can check if McGill has received their Permanent Code, after they have accepted the University offer of admission by viewing their unofficial transcript on Minerva. If the University has the Permanent Code on file it will be displayed at the top of the unofficial transcript, below their McGill ID.

10.2.3 Residents of Quebec

New students who are citizens or Permanent Residents of Canada, and who qualify for the Quebec rate of tuition fees, must also provide proof of Québec residency in addition to the documents listed in the above section. There are two ways of establishing Québec residency status:

1. Without an "Attestation of Residency in Quebec" form, where the student must qualify for one of the situations indicated below and submit proof to that effect:

a. Student was born in Québec. Documents: Quebec birth or baptismal certificate (issued prior to Jan. 1st, 1994) with place of birth clearly shown, valid Canadian passport indicating Quebec as place of birth;

b. Student obtained Landed Immigrant status by virtue of a Certificate of Selection of Québec (CSQ). Documents: CSQ document, written confirmation from Immigration Quebec that a CSQ was issued;

c. Student's high school and CEGEP transcripts transmitted electronically to McGill from the Ministry of Education of Quebec indicate "Quebec" as the place of residence. Document: final Quebec high school transcript;

d. Student was approved for a Quebec loan for the current academic year. Document: Quebec loan certificate;

e. Student is a member of an aboriginal community of Quebec. Document: letter from a band council official, band membership card.

2. With an "Attestation of Residency in Quebec" form (available at www.mcgill.ca/student-records/fees/poc) where the student must qualify for one of the situations indicated on the form and send it, signed and dated, along with all the documents requested on the attestation. A copy of the guidelines (in French) as established by the Ministry of Education of Quebec (MEQ) may be obtained from their Website at the following address: www.meq.gouv.qc.ca/ens-sup/FTP/rq-guide.pdf.

Students can check on Minerva to verify that their documents have been processed. Please allow approximately 15 working days to record receipt of your documentation.

10.2.4 International Students

New students who are international students must provide:

a. one of the following:

· Study permit issued by Immigration Canada and Certificate of Acceptation of Québec (CAQ)
· Convention Refugee status document

and

b. if the information was not already provided at the time of application to McGill, a signed Permanent Code form available at www.mcgill.ca/student-records/fees/permcode, indicating the names of the student's father and mother, or a Permanent Code.

Students can check if McGill has received their Permanent Code, after they have accepted the University's offer of admission by viewing their unofficial transcript on Minerva. If the University has the Permanent Code on file it will be displayed at the top of the unofficial transcript, below their McGill ID.

Mail or fax copies of documents prior to arrival on campus.

The student's McGill ID number and contact information must show clearly on all documentation, and be mailed or faxed prior to arrival on campus. If McGill has not received this information prior to arrival, ID cards will not be issued and the student will be assessed international fees.

Mail or fax to:

Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office, James Administration Bldg., Government Reporting Unit,

845 Sherbrooke Street West, 2nd floor
Montréal, QC, H3A 2T5
Canada

Fax: (514) 398-8939
For questions, please e-mail que-can@mcgill.ca or phone (514) 398-2224.

10.2.5 No Retroactivity

The Student Accounts Office will send students a fee statement based on the citizenship information and documentation on file at the time the statement is issued. If the appropriate proof required to support a citizenship or Quebec residency status is not received by the fee deadline indicated on the statement, students will be billed at the international rate of tuition. Late payment and interest charges may also incur on the unpaid balance. Students who submit their proof of status after the payment deadline indicated will have the international supplement waived, but will be responsible for the late payment and interest charged to their account.

Students should note that all documentation must be received by the end of the last day of classes of a current term to take effect for that term. All documents received after that date will be updated for the following term only, and the higher fees cannot be retroactively reversed for a previous term.

10.3 Identification (ID) Cards

Students registered at McGill are required to present an ID card when writing examinations and when using libraries, Student Services, certain laboratories, and many residences.

An ID card cannot be issued until at least 24 hours after the student has registered. When requesting the card, new students must present permanent code information and proof of legal status in Canada (for a list of documents please see section 2.2). International students must also show proof of health coverage (Blue Cross certificate or confirmation of exemption). Contact International Student Services at (514) 398-6012 or consult their Website at www.mcgill.ca/stuserv/iss for additional information.

ID cards will not be issued if any of the above documents are missing.

Registered students may obtain an ID card at these times and locations:

Wednesday, August 4 to Monday, August 16, 2004
Open 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (except Fridays and weekends)

Canadian and Quebec students are encouraged to come during this period to avoid line-ups later in August. No international students can be carded before August 17.

 
Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office, James Administration Building, Room 205
Tuesday, August 17 to Tuesday, August 31, 2004
Open 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. including Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 20-22.
Closed Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 28-29.

All students, including international students

 
Lorne M. Trottier Building
3630 University Street
After September 1, 2004
Normal office hours
 
Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office, James Administration Building, Room 205

On Macdonald Campus, registered students may obtain an ID card from the Student Affairs Office, Room 106, Laird Hall.

From Monday, August 23 to Tuesday, August 31 by appointment (refer to Orientation Schedule).

From Wednesday, September 1 to Friday, September 10 (closed Monday, September 6).

Service is available between 9:00 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.

Other notes:

· students who do not register for consecutive terms should retain their ID card to avoid having to replace it when they reregister.
· if your card has expired there is no charge for a replacement as long as you hand in the old proximity card.
· if you change programs or faculties there is no charge as long as you hand in the old proximity card.
· if your card has been lost, stolen or damaged, there is a $20 replacement fee.

The Student Identification Card is the property of the University and students withdrawing from all of their courses must attach their ID card to the withdrawal form or return their ID card to the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office (or the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Student Affairs Office, Macdonald Campus).

Students who need security access to labs or other facilities should refer to www.mcgill.ca/security/access.

10.4 Legal Name

All students are registered under their legal name as shown in one of the following documents:

1. Canadian birth certificate.

2. Canadian Immigration Record of Landing (IMM1000 or IMM5292 and Permanent Residence card, both sides).

3. International passport (for Canadians, a Canadian Citizenship card is acceptable).

4. Canadian Immigration Study or Work Permit document.

5. Certificate of Acceptance of Quebec (CAQ).

6. Letter from the International Student's Consulate or Embassy in Canada.

7. Marriage certificate translated into English or French by a sworn officer.

In the case of a variation in the spelling of the name among these documents, the University will use the name on the document that appears first on the above list.

Note:

This is the name that will appear on the student's diploma or certificate on graduation, and on the student's transcript.

10.5 Verification of Name

Students should verify the accuracy of their name on McGill's student records via Minerva and make any necessary corrections to formatting, e.g., upper/lower case letters, accents and spacing.

Students cannot change the name on their record via Minerva. Requests for such changes must made by presenting official documents (see section 10.4 "Legal Name") in person at the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office.

11 General Policies and Information

Further information is published in the General Informations section of the Undergraduate Programs Calendar, which may be accessed on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/courses or obtained from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office, James Administration Building, 845 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2T5.

11.1 Authorization, Acknowledgment and Consent

When applying for admission to the University, all students acknowledge that they are bound by and undertake to observe the statutes, rules, regulations, and policies in place from time to time at McGill University and the faculty or faculties in which they are registered, including those policies contained in the University Calendars and related fee documents. Their obligation as a student commences with their registration and terminates in accordance with the University's statutes, regulations, and policies.

Students should verify any information or statement provided as part of their application, realizing that an admission granted based on information in their application or supporting documents that is incorrect or untrue may be revoked at the sole discretion of the University.

11.2 Student Rights and Responsibilities

The Handbook of Student Rights and Responsibilities is published jointly by the Office of the Dean of Students and the University Secretariat. A compendium of regulations and policies governing student rights and responsibilities at McGill, it is distributed to new students at the Dean of Students' Orientation Sessions. The Handbook is also available on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/secretariat/statutes/documents.

11.3 E-mail Communication

E-mail is one of the official means of communication between McGill University and its students. All students are assigned a Uniform E-mail Address (UEA). They should view and verify their UEA on Minerva, under the Personal Information menu. As with all official University communications, it is the student's responsibility to ensure that time-critical e-mail is accessed, read, and acted upon in a timely fashion. If a student chooses to forward University e-mail to another e-mail mailbox, it is that student's responsibility to ensure that the alternate account is viable.

It is a violation for any user of official McGill e-mail addresses to impersonate a University officer, a member of the faculty, staff or student body, in line with the McGill University "Code of Computer User Conduct" and relevant federal and provincial legislation.

More information about e-mail procedures is available at www.mcgill.ca/email-policy. E-mail support is provided by ICS Customer Support.

11.4 Policy Concerning Access to Records

Statements of account and all other correspondence are sent directly to students who retain full control as to who has access to their records or accounts. (Officers and members of the University staff may also have access to relevant parts of such records for recognized and legitimate use.) No progress report or any other information is sent to parents and/or sponsors unless specifically requested by the student in writing.

In accordance with the Act Respecting Access to Documents held by Public Bodies and the Protection of Personal Information (the "Access Act") personal information, including transcripts of academic records, may be released only with the authorization of the student. When a student applies to McGill, he/she authorizes the University to release certain personal information (name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, date of birth, program and student status) to the following persons and bodies listed below.

The following persons and bodies are included in the authorization:

- libraries of other Quebec universities with which McGill established reciprocal borrowing agreement (I.D. number and bar code may also be disclosed to such libraries)
- the Quebec Ministry of Education, in order to create, validate and/or modify the student's Permanent Code
- the appropriate authorities involved with the external or internal funding of the student's fees (financial records may also be disclosed to such authorities)
- the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada
- the Association of Registrars of Universities and Colleges of Canada and the Conférence des recteurs et des principaux des universités du Québec, or the member institutions of these organizations, for the purpose of admissions operations and the production of statistics
- the school(s) or college(s) which the student attended

Students who choose to not authorize the University to disclose personal information to the following organizations, must complete and submit an opposition form. The opposition form is available at the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office.

- students and alumni who have volunteered to speak with admitted students
- the Student Associations recognized by McGill University for the category(ies) of students to which the student belongs
- the McGill Alumni Association
- professional bodies or corporations (e.g., engineers, dentists)
- McGill Network and Communications Services for the purposes of listing the student's McGill e-mail address in an online e-mail directory.

11.5 Transcript of Academic Record

11.5.1 Unofficial Transcripts

Students who require a copy of their student record can view and print their own unofficial transcript by accessing Minerva. This applies to records from 1972 to present. For pre-1972 records, an official transcript must be ordered.

11.5.2 Official Transcripts

Official transcripts can be ordered on-line via Minerva. Students who cannot access Minerva, should fill out the "Request for Release of Official Document" form available on-line at www.mcgill.ca/student-records/transcripts/ or in person at the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office. Transcript requests may be submitted by mail, by fax, or in person but must be signed by the student. To protect privacy, we do not accept

telephone or e-mail requests.

Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office
James Administration Building
845 Sherbrooke Street West, Room 205
Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T5
Fax: (514) 398-8939

11.5.3 General Information

Transcripts are free of charge.

Official transcripts are sent directly to the addresses provided by the student. Official transcripts in sealed envelopes can be given to those requesting them.

Requests are processed in 3 to 5 working days, somewhat longer for pre-1976 records and at peak times.

ARR cannot be responsible for transcripts that are lost or delayed in the mail.

The University will issue only complete transcripts recording all work attempted and results obtained in any and all programs. In no circumstances will partial transcripts be issued.

Official transcripts will NOT be issued for students registered on or after September 2000 who have failed to provide the information and/or documents necessary to obtain or verify their Permanent Code.

Transcripts will not be issued if you owe fees or fines over $30.

Official transcripts are produced on secure paper that cannot be copied.

11.5.4 Course Numbering on the Transcript

Prior to September 2002, course numbers had a seven character designation beginning with the three number code for the teaching unit/department. The next three digits specified the course, with the first of these indicating its level. The final character was a letter indicating the term, or terms, during which the course was offered. For example:
107-200A = Philosophy (107) course (200) in Fall Term (A);
301-202B = Architecture (301) course (202) in Winter Term (B);
154-230D = Economics (154) course (230) extending for two terms, fall and winter (D).

A list of the former Teaching Unit Codes and their Subject Code equivalents is available on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/student-records/transcripts.

11.6 Health Insurance - Canadian Residents

Canadian students from outside the province of Quebec should check with their own provincial medicare office to ensure the validity of their health coverage while studying at McGill.

Canadian students residing outside Canada may not qualify for any provincial medicare programs. In this case, they may purchase the Health Insurance for International Students.

All undergraduate students who pay Canadian fees and who are members of the Students' Society of McGill University (SSMU) are automatically covered by the Students' Society's Health and Dental Plan. For details on fees and on what is covered by this plan, please refer to the information contained on the Web at www.aseq.com.

11.7 Health Insurance - International Students

By Senate regulation, all students, as well as their accompanying dependents, who do not have Canadian citizenship or Permanent Resident status must participate in a compulsory health insurance plan administered by the University. When registering by Minerva, students will be directed to the International Student Services Web page for enrolment procedures and details. Please refer to the Fees Section for information concerning rates.

Students registering for the first time in September (January) should note that Maternity Benefits for pregnancies which commenced prior to July 15th (November 15th) are not covered by the University's health insurance plan.

All inquiries related to this University policy must be directed to International Student Services.

Health Insurance: Telephone: (514) 398-6012
E-mail: international.health@mcgill.ca

11.8 Computing Facilities

11.8.1 IST Customer Services (ICS)

McGill ICS provides technical support for the following student services: E-mail, Dialup Access Service (DAS), Virtual Private Network (VPN), REZ Voice and Data Service (post-installation), Wireless Network and WebCT.

They may be reached on-line via the Virtual Help Desk at www.mcgill.ca/ics/vhd or by phone at (514) 398-3398, or in person at Burnside Hall in room 112.

11.8.2 Network and Communications Services (NCS)

McGill NCS provides data services including access to Local Area Networks (LANs), the Internet, e-mail, McGill central systems, and the McGill University Website - all from virtually anywhere on campus (wired or wireless) and remotely. They also provide voice service (with long distance and voice mail) to students in McGill Residences. The Website at www.mcgill.ca/ncs lists products and services offered by McGill NCS.

11.8.3 WebCT

WebCT is McGill's on-line course management system.

WebCT is used in a large number of McGill courses. Currently

most of them are taught in a hybrid fashion with WebCT serving as

a component within a traditional class structure. As an on-line environment, WebCT provides key tools for extending the educational experience. Students can access content in various forms, post assignments, take quizzes and participate in on-line discussions.

The WebCT Student Resources Website at www.mcgill.ca/webct/students provides an overview of WebCT tools, task-oriented how-tos and general advice for student success with educational technology. Help is available on-line via the Virtual Help Desk at www.mcgill.ca/ics/vhd and by phone at (514) 398-3398.

11.8.4 Computer Labs

The computer labs are provided by many faculties and departments for students in their programs. A list of these can be found on the Web via the McGill Gateway at www.mcgill.ca/index/computer. Check the unit listings or contact the unit directly for information concerning facilities and accessibility.

11.8.5 Instructional Communications Centre

The Instructional Communications Centre (ICC) provides services related to the use of technology in teaching. It is McGill's central facility for the loan of audiovisual equipment and support for video production.

The ICC Audiovisual Arrangements Section located in the lobby of the Redpath Library and the ICC office at the Macdonald Campus house a full range of audio, video, computer, and projection equipment available for loan to McGill students. Equipment is provided free of charge for credit course activities. Training in equipment use is available and advance reservations are highly recommended. Further details are available on the ICC Website www.mcgill.ca/icc/equipment/loan.

The ICC also maintains two video editing suites available for staff and students who wish to produce their own programs. These suites are self-instructional, and sessions should be reserved in advance. For more information or to reserve a session, please contact the ICC Main Office, 688 Sherbrooke St. W., Suite 1600, (514) 398-7200.

11.9 Proper Use of Computing Facilities

Students are required to comply with the Code of Conduct for Users of McGill Computing Facilities as approved by the University Senate. The Code is published as a part of the Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook.

11.10 Academic Integrity

In submitting work in their courses, students should remember that plagiarism and cheating are considered to be extremely serious offences.

Students who have any doubt as to what might be considered "plagiarism" in preparing an essay or term paper should consult the instructor of the course to obtain appropriate guidelines. Students should also consult the academic integrity Website at www.mcgill.ca/integrity.

The possession or use of unauthorized materials in any test or examination constitutes cheating. Responses on multiple-choice examinations are normally checked by the exam security computer monitoring program. The program detects pairs of students with unusually similar answer patterns on multiple choice exams. Data generated by the exam security computer monitoring program can be used as admissible evidence either to initiate or corroborate an investigation or a charge of cheating under Section 16 of the Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures. The Code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary Procedures includes sections on plagiarism and cheating. The Code is included in the Handbook of Student Rights and Responsibilities.

12 Calendar of Dates - Faculty of Law
2004-2005

2004
April 15, Thurs. to April 30, Fri.
Examination period.
May 19, Wed.
Registration (credits restricted) starts for returning U4 students in the Faculty of Law.
May 21, Fri.
Registration (credits restricted) starts for returning U3 students in the Faculty of Law.
May 24, Mon.
Victoria Day. No classes.
Administrative offices and Libraries closed.
May 25, Tues.
Registration (credits restricted) starts for returning U2 students in the Faculty of Law.
May 27, Thurs.
Registration with credit limit raised for all returning students in the Faculty of Law.
May 31, Mon.
Law application deadline for deferred and supplemental examinations (fall term, winter term, and full-year courses).
June 4, Fri.
Law Convocation.
Between June 25 and August 20 inclusive, administrative offices will be closed each Friday. In addition, administrative offices will be closed on Thursday, June 24 and Thursday, July 1.
June 24, Thurs.
La fête nationale du Québec. Classes cancelled. Administrative offices and Libraries closed.
July 1, Thurs.
Canada Day. Classes cancelled. Administrative offices and Libraries closed.
Aug. 2, Mon.
Last day for returning students to register without a late fee.
Aug. 3, Tues. to Sept. 1, Wed.
Returning students, late registration, with $50 late fee.
U1, Special, and Visiting students registration period.
Aug. 9, Mon. to Aug. 19, Thurs.
Deferred and Supplemental Examinations in Law.
Aug. 19, Thurs. to Sept. 3, Fri.
Orientation Centre opens daily at 9:00, Brown Student Services Building, 3600 McTavish Street (closed weekends and Labour Day).
Aug. 23, Mon. to Aug. 31, Tues.
Orientation week.
Aug. 24, Tues
University orientation, "Discover McGill" for all new undergraduate students.
Aug. 27, Fri.
New students - deadline for cancellation of registration. (Registration deposit is forfeited.) Returning students - deadline for cancellation of registration. without penalty, for fall term.
Aug. 31, Tues.
Faculty Orientation and in-person confirmation of registration for Law first year, Special and Visiting Students
Sept. 1, Wed.
Lectures begin.
Sept. 2, Thurs. to Sept. 12, Sun.
Late Registration, with a $100 late fee.
Sept. 6, Mon.
Labour Day. Administrative offices and Libraries closed.
Sept. 12, Sun.
Course Change (Drop/Add) deadline for Fall term and first part of multi-term courses starting in September 2004. After this date students receive a mark of W (withdrawn).
Sept. 16, Thurs.
Rosh Hashanah.
Sept. 19, Sun.
Deadline for withdrawal (W) with full refund (less $100 minimum charge for returning students and less deposit for new students, in case of complete withdrawal from the University).
Sept. 25, Sat.
Yom Kippur
Oct.4, Mon., to
Oct. 8, Fri.
Verification Period.
Oct. 10, Sun.
Deadline for withdrawal (W) from fall term courses.
Oct. 11, Mon.
Thanksgiving Day. Classes cancelled. Administrative offfices and Libraries closed.
Oct. 28, Thurs.
Fall Convocation, 14:30. Classes as usual.
Nov. 30, Tues.
Last day of lectures for courses that follow the Tuesday-Thursday class schedule.
Dec. 2, Thurs.
Unless the instructor has otherwise made up the contact time with the class, last day of lectures for courses that are taught in 3-hour Monday blocks.
Dec. 3, Fri.
Last day of lectures for courses that follow the Monday-Wednesday-Friday schedule..
Dec. 6, Mon. to Dec. 21, Tues.
Examinations.
Dec. 23, Thurs. to Jan. 2, Sun.
Christmas/New Year. Administrative offices closed between December 25 and January 2 inclusive. Library hours available at Reference Desks.

2005
 
NOTE: The first Tuesday (January 4) will follow a Monday Schedule.
Jan. 4, Tues.
Lectures begin.
Jan. 4, Tues. to Jan. 16, Sun.
Late registration for new students, with $100 late fee.
Jan. 16, Sun.
Deadline for withdrawals from multi-term courses that started in September 2004, with fee refund for Winter Term.
Jan. 17, Mon.
Deadline for application for admission to first year for non-CEGEP and Advanced Standing applicants.
Jan. 23, Sun.
Deadline for withdrawals from Winter Term courses with fee refund.
Jan. 31, Mon. to Feb. 4, Fri.
Verification Period.
Feb, 13, Sun.
Deadline for withdrawals (W) from Winter Term courses
Feb. 21, Mon. to Feb. 25, Fri.
Study Break.
March 1, Tues.
Deadline for application for admission for students applying from CEGEP and French Baccalaureate and for Law Visiting students..
TBA
Registration for returning students for the 2005-06 session.
March 25, Fri. and March 28, Mon.
Easter. No classes or examinations. Administrative offices closed. Library hours available at Reference Desks.
April 13, Wed.
Last day of lectures.
April 14, Thurs.
to April 29, Fri.
Examination period for Winter Term and multi-term courses.
May 2, Mon.
Deadline for Law Transfer and Quebec Bar applicants
May 23, Mon.
Victoria Day. Classes cancelled. Administrative offices and Libraries closed.
May 30, Mon.
Law application deadline for deferred and supplemental examinations (fall term, winter term and full year courses).
TBA
Law Convocation.
Aug. 8, Mon. to Aug. 18, Thurs.
Deferred and Supplemental Examinations in Law.

13 Fees

The University reserves the right to make changes without notice in the published scale of fees. (Note: The information in this section was prepared in February 2004.)

Further information regarding fees can be found on the Student Accounts Web site www.mcgill.ca/student-accounts.

Note:

This section relates only to fees for the undergraduate programme. Graduate fee information (including programmes which combine an undergraduate Law programme with a graduate programme, e.g., M.B.A. or M.S.W.) can be found in the General Information section of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Calendar, or obtained from the unit concerned.

13.1 Fee Information Booklet

The Fee Information booklet, published in June of each year by the Student Accounts Office, contains additional information as well as any fee adjustments which may have been made after the publication of this Calendar. Students are bound by the policies and procedures contained therein. In the event of any discrepancy, the Fee Information booklet supersedes the Calendar.

A copy of the booklet will be sent to all new students. The contents are also available on the Student Accounts Web site at www.mcgill. ca/student-accounts.

13.2 Access to Fee Information

Students can view their Account Summary by Term on Minerva. The Fall 2004 session fes become accessible as of August 1st.

13.3 Tuition Fees

The University will charge the following tuition fees in 2004-05.

Tuition fees vary according to the residence and citizenship status of the student. The rates described below only refer to credit activities.

Quebec Students

The 2004-05 tuition fees for Quebec students who are Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents are $55.61 per credit or $1,668.30 for 30 credits.

In accordance with provincial government requirements, students must provide proof that they qualify for assessment of fees at the Quebec rate; see section 10.2 "Documentation" for details.

Note:

Students who do not submit appropriate documentation by the stipulated deadline are billed at the non-Quebec Canadian or the international rate, depending on the documentation submitted.
If proof of status is submitted after a student has been billed, but before the document submission deadline, the tuition supplement will be waived. Any late payment and/or interest charges accumulated during the documentation evaluation period will not be waived.

Non-Quebec Students (Canadian or Permanent Resident)

The 2004-05 tuition fees for non-Quebec students who are Canadian citizens or Permanent Residents are expected to be $146.71 per credit or $4,401.30 for 30 credits. The Ministère de l'Éducation du Québec will formally notify the University during the Spring of any changes.

In accordance with provincial government requirements, students must provide proof that they qualify for assessment of fees at the non-Quebec Canadian rate; see section 10.2.2 "Canadians or Permanent Residents of Canada" for details.

Note:

Students who do not submit appropriate documentation by the stipulated deadline will be billed at the international rate.

If proof of status is submitted after a student has been billed, but before the document submission deadline, the tuition supplement will be waived. Any late payment and/or interest charges accumulated during the documentation evaluation period will not be waived.

International Students

The 2004-05 tuition fees for international students in the Faculty of Law undergraduate programme are $325.61 per credit ($9,768.30 for 30 credits).

Exemption from International Tuition Fees may be claimed by students in certain categories. Such students, if eligible, are then assessed at the Quebec student rate.

A list of these categories and the required application forms can be obtained from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office. Information is also available on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/ students.

13.4 Compulsory Fees

13.4.1 Student Services Fees

Student Services fees are governed by the Senate Committee on the Coordination of Student Services, a parity committee composed equally of students and university staff.

Through the Dean of Students' Office these services are available on campus to help students achieve greater academic, physical and social well-being. They include athletics facilities, student health and mental health, financial aid, counselling, tutorial service, off-campus housing, services for students with disabilities, chaplaincy, the Career and Placement Service, International Student Services, and the administration of the Student Rights and Responsibilities Handbook.

13.4.2 Student Society Fees

Student Society fees are compulsory fees collected on behalf of student organizations. Fees must be approved by the student body through fee referenda according to the constitutional rules of the association or society.

Changes to Student Society fees are voted upon by the students during the Spring referendum period.

Note:

For International students, the student society fee includes the SSMU Dental Insurance plan of $217. International students will be obliged to participate in the University's compulsory International Health Insurance Plan, which at the 2003-04 rate, cost $641 for single coverage. For more information, please contact International Student Services, (514) 398-6012.

13.4.3 Registration Charge

The University charges a per credit registration charge to all students in courses and programs. This is assessed as follows: $6.50 per credit to a maximum of $97.50 per term.

13.4.4 Information Technology Charge

The purpose of the information technology charge is to enhance certain technology services provided to students as well as to provide training and support to students in the use of new technology. The fee is assessed as follows: $5.83 per credit to a maximum of $87.45 per term.

13.4.5 Transcript Charge

The University charges a per credit transcript charge to all students. This entitles students to order transcripts free of charge and is assessed as follows: $.58 per credit to a maximum of $8.75 per term.

13.4.6 Copyright Fee

All Quebec universities pay a per credit fee to Copibec (a consortium that protects the interests of authors and editors) for the right to photocopy material protected by copyright. The fee is assessed as follows: $.35 per credit to a maximum of $5.25 per term.

13.5 Other Fees

International Student Health and Accident Plan - Single (compulsory) (based on 2002-03 rates)
$641
Application for Admission
 
All faculties (except Management graduate programs)
$60
Management graduate programs
$100
Reconsideration of Application (excluding Medicine and Dentistry)
40
Admission appeals charge (excluding Medicine)
100
Late Registration*
 
After regular registration deadline:
 
· All eligible returning students, except Special students and graduate part-time students
$50
· Special students and graduate part-time students
$20
As of the second day of classes
 
· All students except Special students and graduate part-time students
$100
· Special students and graduate part-time students
$40
Late Course Change Fee (each change after deadline for course change)
$25
Minimum Charge upon withdrawal
(or, for newly admitted students, the deposit)
$100
Re-reading Examination Paper
(refundable in some faculties)
$35
Supplemental Examination
$35
Thesis Examination Charge (and resubmission fee, if applicable) (Payable by certified cheque or money order)
- Master's thesis
- Ph.D. thesis
$75
$100
Graduation Fee (compulsory)**
$60
Duplicate Student ID Card
$20
Returned cheque
$20
Late Payment
- charged on balances >$50 as of the end of October (end of February for the Winter term)
$25
Interest on outstanding balances:
1.42% per month or 17.03% annually
 

* Students may be exempted from this fee only with the written authorization of the Associate Dean.

** Students will be charged a graduation fee in their graduating year according to the following schedule: February graduation - end of November; May graduation - end of February; and October graduation - end of March. Students added to the graduation lists late will be charged accordingly.

Students could expect the minimum cost for books and case books to be $500.
Students will receive, free of charge, brief outlines of courses where such are available. Casebooks, statutes, etc. will be sold through the Law Bookstore.

13.6 Billings and Due Dates

Confirmation of Acceptance Deposit

Students admitted to the University will be required to confirm their acceptance of the offer of admission on www.mcgill.ca/minerva-students/applicants and pay the required deposit by credit card (Visa or Mastercard) at that time.

Invoicing of Fees

Students may request that their fee invoice be sent to a Student Billing Address by updating their personal information on Minerva. Otherwise invoices will be sent to the current Mailing address. Interest will not be cancelled due to non-receipt of fee invoices.

For most returning students who register during the regular registration period, an invoice will be mailed in early August, due on August 30th.
New students who register during the month of August will receive their invoice in early September, due on September 29th.
All students returning to the University for the Winter term must pay their fees by January 3, 2005.
New students starting in the Winter term will receive their invoice in early January, due on January 28th.

Late Payment Fees:

Students who still have an outstanding balance greater than $50 on their account as of October 29th (February 28th for the Winter term) will be charged a late payment fee of $25 over and above interest.

13.7 Fees and Withdrawal from the University

All students who have accessed Minerva to register must officially withdraw in accordance with section 9.5.1 "Course Withdrawal" if they decide not to attend the Term(s) for which they have registered. Otherwise they will be liable for all applicable tuition and other fees.

Students who have accessed Minerva and who drop their last course from September 1st through to the withdrawal period with full refund, will be deemed to have withdrawn from the University. They will be automatically charged a minimum charge of $100 (or their deposit fee if newly admitted) to cover administrative costs of registration.

Students who discontinue their classes without taking steps to drop their courses will be liable for all applicable tuition and other fees.

13.7.1 Fee Refund Deadlines

The deadline dates for course refunds are independent of the deadline dates given for withdrawal from courses.

Fall Term - up to and including September 19:
Returning students - 100%* refund (Less minimum charge of $100 in the case of complete withdrawal.)
New students - 100%* refund (Less registration deposit.)

Fall Term - after September 19:

No refund.

Winter Term - up to and including January 23:
Returning students - 100%* refund (Less minimum charge of $100 in the case of complete withdrawal.)
New students - 100%* refund (Less registration deposit.)

Winter Term - after January 23:

No refund.

* Including tuition fees, society and other fees, student services, registration and transcripts charges, and information technology charge.

* Students should access the Student Accounts website www.mcgill.ca/student-accounts for information on payment due dates.

13.8 Other Policies Related to Fees

13.8.1 Impact of Non-Payment

The University shall have no obligation to issue any transcript of record, award any diploma or re-register a student in case of non-payment of tuition fees, library fees, student housing fees or loans on their due date. Access to Minerva for registration functions will be denied until these debts are paid in full or arrangements made to settle the debt.

Students who register in a given term who have amounts owing from previous terms must make payment arrangements with either the Student Aid Office or the Student Accounts Office prior to the end of the course add/drop period. Failure to do so will lead to the current term's registration being cancelled.

13.8.2 Acceptance of Fees vs Academic Standing

Acceptance of fees by the University in no way guarantees that students will receive academic permission to pursue their studies. If it is subsequently determined that the academic standing does not permit the student to continue, all fees paid in advance will be refunded on application to the Student Accounts Office.

13.8.3 Fees for Students in Two Programs

Students in two programs normally are billed additional fees for their second program. Depending on the level of the two programs, e.g., one program at the undergraduate vs. one program at the graduate level, students may incur both society and faculty fees and/or additional tuition fees. Consult the student accounts website for further details.

Students in two programs may consult the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office for information on tuition fees. Adjustments to bills will be made throughout the term when fees cannot be automatically calculated.

13.9 Deferred Fee Payment

13.9.1 Students with Sponsors

Students whose fees will be paid by an outside agency such as the Department of Veterans Affairs, CIDA, a foreign government, or their University department (i.e., teaching assistants or demonstrators), must have written evidence to that effect. Students in any of the above categories should go to the Student Accounts Office with the appropriate documentation.

When a third party has agreed to pay fees on behalf of a student, payment will be recorded on the fee account thereby reducing the balance the student must pay. The University reserves the right to insist upon payment. If the third party does not pay the promised fees within 90 days of invoicing, the student will be responsible for paying the fees plus the late payment fee and accrued interest.

13.9.2 Students receiving McGill Scholarships/Awards

Fall Term:

McGill scholarships or awards are normally credited to the recipient's fee account by mid-August. These awards have the effect of reducing the student's outstanding balance.

Winter Term:

Students will be able to view upcoming Winter term scholarships or awards on Minerva once processed by the Student Aid Office. These awards are post-dated and will be released to the student's fee account in January prior to Winter fees being due.

13.9.3 Students receiving Government Aid

Students are encouraged to pay their tuition promptly upon receipt of their government assistance. Interest on outstanding tuition is charged monthly beginning in August for returning students and in September for new students. Students who have applied for government assistance for full-time studies by June 30 will be entitled to an exemption of interest and late payment charges effective upon receipt of their aid at the Student Aid Office.

13.9.4 Graduate Awards/Teaching Assistantships

Graduate students who are recipients of awards where funds are paid directly to them (e.g. CIMR, NSERC, etc.) are normally required to pay their fees by the payment due dates. Students who are dependent on the income received from a Teaching Assistantship in order to pay their tuition should consult with their graduate department to see if they qualify for a deferral of their fees.

Arrangements can be made with the department to have regular deductions at source to pay tuition. To initiate these deductions, fill out the form "Student Fee Payroll Deduction Auithorization" found on the website at www.is.mcgill.ca/minerva/Human_Resources/payroll/payroll_forms.htm

13.10 Fees and Charges

Tuition fees at the undergraduate level are based on the number of credits taken. The following table reflects a normal full-time course load of 30 credits per year.

Part-time students will be charged tuition fees at the per credit rate and will be subject to student society fees, student services fees, registration and transcripts charges, and information technology charges.

FACULTY OF LAW - LL.B., B.C.L
Fees / Charges
Quebec
Students
Non-Quebec
Canadians
International
Students
Tuition
1,668.30
4,401.30
11,085.00
Society and other Fees
528.50
528.50
480.82
Student Services*
343.00
343.00
412.00
Registration and Transcripts Charges
212.40
212.40
212.40
Copyright Fee
10.50
10.50
10.50
Information
Technology Charge
174.90
174.90
174.90
TOTAL
$2,957.60
$5,690.60
$12,375.62
As of May 2004
.

14 Admission to the Legal Profession

While the Career Placement Office of the Faculty of Law endeavours to maintain up-to-date information on Bar Admission requirements for jurisdictions of interest to the majority of students graduating from the Faculty, it is the individual student's responsibility to ensure that he or she has fulfilled all requirements, including pre-law educational requirements, of the Bar to which he or she is applying.

14.1 Canada

Information on the following Bars/Law Societies can be obtained by consulting their website:

Barreau du Québec: www.barreau.qc.ca
Chambre des notaires du Québec: www.cdnq.org
École du barreau du Québec: www.ecoledubarreau.qc.ca
Federation of Law Societies of Canada: www.flsc.ca
(For information on the National Committee on Accreditation)
Law Society of Alberta: www.lawsocietyalberta.com
Law Society of British Columbia: www.lawsociety.bc.ca
Law Society of Manitoba: www.lawsociety.mb.ca
Law Society of the Northwest Territories: www.lawsociety.nt.ca
Law Society of Nunavut: www.lawsociety.nu.ca
Law Society of Saskatchewan: www.lawsociety.sk.ca
Law Society of Upper Canada (Ontario): www.lsuc.on.ca
Law Society of Newfoundland: www.lawsociety.nf.ca
Law Society of Yukon: www.lawsocietyyukon.com
Law Society of New Brunswick: www.lawsociety.nb.ca
Nova Scotia Barristers' Society: www.nsbs.ns.ca

Please note that the Law Society of Prince Edward Island does not have a website.

14.1.1 Language Requirements - Quebec

Quebec law requires that candidates seeking admission to provincially-recognized professional corporations must possess a working knowledge of the French language, that is, be able to communicate verbally and in writing in that language.

To demonstrate this capability, candidates will be required to pass an examination set by the Office de la langue française, unless they can show that three years of full-time instruction in a French post-primary school have been completed. Candidates who have completed their secondary education in Quebec in 1986 or later and have received their certificate from secondary school are exempt from writing the examination. The professional corporation will require this certificate, proof of attendance or of successful completion of the Office examination.

The examination may be attempted by registered students during the two years prior to the date they receive a degree giving access to a professional corporation. Application forms for sitting the exam while still a student may be obtained from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office. Priority will be given to those closest to graduation. Examinations take place every three months and may be attempted an unlimited number of times.

More information may be obtained from the Office de la langue française, 125 Sherbrooke Street West, Montréal, Québec, H2X 1X4. Telephone (514) 873-4833.

14.2 The United States

The LL.B. degree is an approved law degree in some U.S. jurisdictions, and is accepted as the equivalent of a degree in law from an accredited U.S. law school in those jurisdictions. This approval means that McGill graduates may proceed through the bar admission process in those jurisdictions in the same way as their U.S. counterparts.

In addition to requiring a recognized law degree, some states require specific pre-law studies in order for a candidate to be eligible to sit state Bar exams. Students contemplating practice in the United States should ensure as early as possible that they will meet the Bar Admission requirements of the jurisdiction in which they intend to practice. Further information on a number of jurisdictions is available from the Career Placement Office.

Information on the Bar examinations of New York and Massachusetts can be obtained by consulting the following websites:

The Massachusetts Board of Bar Examiners: www.state.ma.us/bbe
The New York State Board of Law Examiners:
www.nybarexam.org

15 Placement of Graduates and Alumni Relations

The programmes offered by the Faculty of Law prepare students for a wide array of careers in the practice of law or related fields. To enable its graduates to take the fullest possible advantage of the opportunities available to them, the Faculty provides career counselling to its students through its Career Placement Office. The Director of the Office oversees all placement activities, including assisting students with their search for summer employment and articling positions. Placement activities and programmes also provide students with information about the various types of career opportunities open to them after graduation.

The Office also assists employers in their search for qualified candidates by posting, on boards and electronically, notices of job openings, organizing their interview sessions, and overseeing the distribution of their promotional material to students.

The Placement Advisory Committee, made up of two student representatives, the Vice-President of the L.S.A. responsible for Clubs and Services, the Career Placement Administrator, the Director of the Career Placement Office and the Assistant Dean (Admissions, Placement and Alumni Relations) meets regularly to discuss policy issues related to student placement.

15.1 Resource Centre

The Resource Centre of the Career Placement Office houses all information related to employment opportunities, as well as information about Bar admission courses and graduate programmes. Students regularly use the Career Placement Office in their investigation of employment opportunities both in the legal sector and in the alternative careers field.

15.2 On-Campus Recruitment

The Career Placement Office (CPO) organizes and/or coordinates nine recruitment processes. Two of those involve On-Campus Interviews (OCIs): one for the Toronto firms and the other for U.S. firms. Students also have the opportunity to take part in the East/West Recruitment Process, which is held in Toronto.

Prior to the Toronto and U.S. OCIs in the fall, the CPO publishes a list of employers that will be recruiting. Interested students submit their application(s) to the CPO, which then forwards them to the selected employers. The employers select the candidates they intend to interview when they come on campus, and inform the CPO of their choices. The CPO coordinates the scheduling of preliminary interviews with the students who have been selected. Second interviews generally take place at the employer's office and are organized directly between the employers and the students.

As for Montreal recruitment, there are no OCIs; firms conduct interviews at their offices.

15.3 Careers Days

The Career Placement Office organizes three careers fairs annually. The first two, Civil Law and Common Law Careers Days, take place in January and February in preparation for the Canadian recruitment processes. Over 80 legal employers visit the Faculty of Law to speak to students about the opportunities available at their law firm, government body, or association. The third careers fair, known as "Careers Without Borders", is organized in conjunction with the Human Rights Working Group and the International Law Society. At this February event, guest speakers and panellists gather to discuss opportunities for lawyers in the fields of human rights, public law and international law.

As part of this careers fair, the Faculty of Law organized its first "Justice Day" in collaboration with the Department of Justice-Canada.

15.4 Training Programmes and Publications

The Career Placement Office provides materials and organizes seminars on how to pursue a career in law or related areas. Individual counselling is provided by the Career Placement Office Director on the drafting of a curriculum vitae and cover letter as well as preparing for interviews. Workshops on Effective Résumé Writing and Developing Interview Skills are offered regularly. A Mock Interview Programme assists students in preparing for meeting with potential employers.

The Office is also happy to offer the Area of Practice Dinner Series. These provide an opportunity for practitioners to discuss their area of specialization with law students over dinner. The Career Placement Office is also making efforts to increase employment opportunities abroad for students.

The Career Placement Office publishes the Legal Employment Handbook, which is specifically designed to assist students of the Faculty of Law to identify and prepare for job opportunities. Other publications include Ready to Go? The Guide to Your Career in International Law and Opportunities in Human Rights and Sustainable Development, which was written in collaboration with the Faculty's Human Rights Working Group.

15.5 Reciprocity Agreement

Reciprocity agreements have been signed with placement offices of other Canadian law schools, enabling McGill students to obtain assistance in their employment research outside the province of Quebec.

15.6 Alumni/ae Network

McGill's 3,500 alumni/ae frequently assist the Faculty in placing graduates. The Alumni Network is an important resource to current and future students as graduates of the Faculty of Law collectively represent a repository of experience, information, and contacts.

16 Scholarships, Prizes, and Student Aid

A complete list of undergraduate scholarships, bursaries and financial aid in the University generally and the regulations governing the various loan funds are given in the Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards Calendar, which may be accessed on the Web at www.mcgill.ca/courses or obtained from the Admissions, Recruitment and Registrar's Office, James Administration Building, 845 Sherbrooke West, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 3N6. Telephone: (514) 398-3910.

In addition to the graduate prizes and scholarships listed below, which are awarded within McGill University, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Fonds pour la formation des chercheurs et pour l'aide à la recherche, the Canadian Bar Association, and the Federal ministry of Justice sponsor several awards for graduate study.

16.1 Undergraduate Scholarships, Prizes and Student Aid for Entering Students

Unless otherwise noted the following Scholarships and Bursaries are awarded by the Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Law. All accepted candidates are automatically considered for entrance scholarships awarded by the Faculty of Law.

CEGEP students applying for entrance to the Faculty of Law are strongly encouraged to apply for entrance scholarships available to students entering any undergraduate faculty; application forms may be obtained from the University Scholarships Office.

16.1.1 Faculty Entrance Scholarships, Awards and Bursaries
125th Anniversary Entrance Scholarship

- Established by the generous gifts of graduates of the Faculty of Law to mark the occasion of the Faculty's 125th Anniversary. To be awarded to a student with a distinguished record in pre-law studies. Value: approximately $1,000.

125th Anniversary National Programme Scholarships and Bursaries

- Established in 1980 by the generous gifts of graduates of the Faculty of Law to mark the occasion of the Faculty's 125th Anniversary. To be awarded to undergraduates showing promise and having distinguished scholastic records. 125th Anniversary National Programme scholars who show no financial need will be awarded a nominal sum of $100, and the balance of the scholarship monies to be allocated as 125th Anniversary Bursaries to meritorious and needy law students. Value: minimum $2,000.

Yves Caron Memorial Award
- Established in 1978 by the family, friends, former students and colleagues in both the university and the legal professions of the late Yves-Armand Caron, B.A., LL.L.(Montreal), LL.M.(Col.), D.Phil. (Oxon) (1939-1977), who was a distinguished member of the teaching staff from 1967 to 1977 and a prominent member of the Order of Notaries for fifteen years. The scholarship is intended to encourage excellence in his fields of special interest and to commemorate Professor Caron's attachment to his chosen profession as notary. Awarded to an entering student, with preference being given to a student intending to proceed to the notarial profession. Value: approximately $1,750.
Class of 1962 Professor John W. Durnford Bursary
- Established in 1987 by members of the Class of '62 on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of their graduation from the Faculty. This fund will sustain one or more entrance bursaries awarded to students registering in the B.C.L./ LL.B. programme. The bursaries are awarded by the Faculty Scholarships Committee in conjunction with the University Student Aid Office. They are intended to support meritorious students who will make a distinctive contribution to the Faculty, and who, without such support, would be unable to pursue law studies at McGill.
Class of '64 Entrance Scholarships
- Established by members of the Class of '64 on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of their graduation from the Faculty. Awarded to a student entering the first year of the Faculty of Law's programme who has, in the opinion of the Admissions Committee of the Faculty of Law, achieved a distinguished pre-law academic record and who is, in the opinion of the Student Aid Office, in financial need. The scholarship is tenable for up to four years of undergraduate legal studies in the Faculty provided a distinguished academic standing is maintained. Value: $800 each.
Class of 1976 Entrance Scholarship
- Established by the Class of 1976 on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of their graduation from the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Faculty of Law in consultation with the Student Aid Office to a meritorious student entering a full-time undergraduate program in Law who demonstrates financial need. Value: $3,000.
Chief Justice R.A.E. Greenshields Memorial Scholarships and Bursaries
- A number of entrance scholarships established in 1954 pursuant to the will of the late Mrs. R.A.E. Greenshields in memory of her husband, the late Chief Justice Greenshields, B.A.(1883), B.C.L.(1885), D.C.L., LL.D., for many years professor of Criminal Law and Dean of the Faculty of Law. Awarded to students entering the Faculty of Law with distinguished records in pre-law studies and tenable for up to four years if the candidate maintains distinguished academic standing. Greenshields scholars who show no financial need will be awarded the nominal sum of $100, the balance of monies to be allocated as Greenshields bursaries to meritorious law students who are in financial need. Value: minimum $2,000.
Samuel Haberkorn Memorial Entrance Scholarship
- Established by Max Haberkorn B.C.L. (1971), LL.B. (1972) in memory of his father Samuel Haberkorn, a decorated resistance fighter in World War II, in recognition of the sacrifices he made for his children's education. Awarded by the Student Aid Office in consultation with the Faculty of Law to a student entering a Law undergraduate degree programme with an outstanding academic record, who is in financial need. Value $1,750.
I.R. Hart Memorial Scholarship
- Established in 1989 by the family of the late Isidor Raymond Hart, B.A.(1932), B.C.L.(1935), who was a distinguished member of the Order of Notaries from 1935 to 1978. The scholarship is intended to encourage excellence in fields of law of special interest to the notarial profession. It is awarded to a student entering first year, with preference being given to one intending to proceed to the notarial profession. When the designated recipient does not register in the Faculty of Law at McGill, the monies may be allocated as I.R. Hart Memorial Bursaries to meritorious and students who are in financial need. Value: approximately $1,700.
David L. Johnston Scholarship
- Established in 1998 by a generous gift from a McGill graduate of Chemical Engineering (Class of 1959), from Hong Kong, in honour of David L. Johnston, A.B.(Harv.), LL.B.(Cantab. & Queen's), LL.D.(L.S.U.C., Tor., Bishop's, Mem., U.B.C., Queen's, W. Ont., Montr.), DD(Mtl. Dio. Coll.), CC, former Principal of McGill University and Professor in the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Faculty of Law to an outstanding student entering the first year of the law programme.Value: minimum $6,000.
E. Leo Kolber Scholarship
- Founded in 1979 by the friends and colleagues of E. Leo Kolber, B.A.(1949), B.C.L.(1952) to mark his 50th birthday. Awarded to a meritorious student entering first year who is in financial need. Value: approximately $1,800.
Leon Levinson Award
- Established in 1977 by the associates and friends of Leon Levinson, Esq. to mark his 75th birthday and his place as the dean of Canadian court reporters. Awarded annually to a deserving member of the communications media (whether journalist or broadcaster) preferably from the Province of Quebec. This award is intended to assist in the professional development of members of the media by encouraging them to pursue law courses of relevance to their work, whether as a partial student or degree candidate. Value: approximately $6,500.
Grant McCrea Scholarship
- Established in 2002 by Grant McCrea, B.A. (1982), LL.B. (1985), M.A. (1986), for an outstanding student entering a full-time undergraduate degree program in the Faculty of Law who has financial need. Awarded by the Faculty of Law in consultation with the Student Aid Office. Preference shall be given to the students with an academic background in Philosophy and a continuing interest therein. Value: $3,000.
Steve Michelin Entrance Scholarship
- Established in 2003 in memory of Steve Michelin, B.A. (1986), B.C.L. (1990), LL.B. (1990), in recognition of his commitment to student life. The scholarship was established by his family and friends, and by the Class of 1990 on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of their graduation from the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Faculty of Law to a deserving student entering a full-time undergraduate degree program in Law. The award is based on academic merit, with consideration being given to the student's involvement in the community and in extracurricular activies. Value: minimum $3,000
Miller Thomson LLP Entrance Scholarship
- Established in 2003 by Miller Thomson LLP and awarded by the Faculty of Law to a student entering a full-time undergraduate degree program in Law. The award is based on academic merit. Consideration will also be given to the student's involvement in the community and in extracurricular activities. Value: $2,500.
National Programme Scholarships
- A number of entrance scholarships established in 1975 and awarded to candidates with distinguished records in pre-law studies. National Programme scholars who show no financial need will be awarded a nominal sum of $100, and the balance of scholarship monies to be allocated as National Programme bursaries to meritorious law students who are in financial need. Value: minimum $2,000.
S. Frances Norych Memorial Scholarships
- Established in 1991 by family, friends and colleagues to honour the memory of Frances Norych, B.C.L.(1974), LL.B.(1975), a native Montrealer who was a partner of Lafleur Brown de Grandpré and a member of the Bars of Quebec and Ontario.A further contribution was received through a generous bequest by her mother, Basia Norych, in 2003. Awarded by the Faculty of Law to students entering a full-time undergraduate programme in Law who have distinguished academic records. Tenable for four years if candidates maintain distinguished academic standing. Norych scholars who show no financial need will be awarded the nominal sum of $100, the balance of monies to be allocated as Norych bursaries to meritorious Law students who have financial need. Value: minimum $3,000 each.
Ogilvy Renault Scholarship
- Established in 1980 by the generous gifts of members of the firm of Ogilvy Renault to mark the occasion of the firm's centenary in 1979. Awarded to a student with a distinguished academic record. Value: approximately $2,000.
Toronto Law Alumni 150th Anniversary Scholarship
- Established by Faculty of Law graduates in the Toronto area in 1998 to mark the Faculty's 150th anniversary. Awarded by the Faculty of Law to a student with a distinguished academic record entering the undergraduate programme in the Faculty of Law. Value: $1,750.
Wainwright Scholarships and Bursaries
- Established under a bequest from the estate of the late Arnold Wainwright, Q.C. (1879-1967), B.A.(1899), B.C.L.(1902), D.C.L.(1963), for many years a lecturer in the Faculty of Law and a distinguished lawyer of the Montreal Bar. Entrance scholarships awarded to undergraduates of promise having distinguished scholastic records, registering in the B.C.L./LL.B. programme. Tenable for four years if candidates maintain distinguished academic standing. Wainwright scholars who show no financial need will be awarded the nominal sum of $100, the balance of monies to be allocated as Wainwright bursaries to meritorious students who are in financial need. Value: maximum $4,000 each, renewable up to three times.
16.1.2 Law Society Scholarships

Various provincial law societies and law foundations sponsor scholarships for residents of their respective provinces. The following scholarships are awarded directly by the organizations listed.

Law Foundation of Newfoundland Scholarship
- - Up to three entrance scholarships valued at $5,000 each awarded to residents of the province of Newfoundland. Application should be made to the Law Foundation of Newfoundland. Murray Premises, 2nd floor, 5 Beck's Cove, P.O. Box 5907, St John's, NF, A1C 5X4. Telephone: (709) 754-4424. Fax: (709) 754-4320. Web site: www.atyp.com/lawfoundationnf/.
Law Society of Prince Edward Island Scholarship
- - A scholarship awarded to a student in any year who is a resident of Prince Edward Island. Application should be made to the Law Society of Prince Edward Island at P.O. Box 128, 49 Water Street, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 7K2. Telephone: (902) 566-1666.
Fax: (902) 368-7557.

16.2 Undergraduate Scholarships, Prizes and Student Aid for Continuing Students

In addition to renewals of the Greenshields, Levinson, and Wainwright Entrance Scholarships, the Faculty, on recommendation of the Prizes and Scholarships Committee also awards the following scholarships and bursaries to outstanding students in upper years (unless otherwise noted).

16.2.1 Class Standing
Blake, Cassells & Graydon LL.P Scholarship
- Established in 2001 by Blake, Cassels & Graydon LL.P, for undergraduate students who are entering their second year of studies in the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Faculty of Law to a student who has obtained an academic standing in the top 10% of their class. Special consideration may be given for financial need (in consultation with the Student Aid Office), involvement in the community and extra-curricular activities at the University or at the Faculty of Law. Renewable for one year provided the holder maintains an academic standing in the top 20% of their class. Recipients of the award will be known as "Blake Scholars". Value: minimum $5,000.
Kark Claxton, Jr. Memorial Award
- Established in 1987 by the family, fellow law students and friends of Kark Claxton, Jr., B.C.L.(1987). Kark Claxton, Jr. was born and educated in Montreal, attending elementary school in Lasalle and graduating from Lasalle High School as class valedictorian. He graduated with a Diplôme d'études collégiales from Champlain College in 1984, winning the Award of Excellence given by the Quebec Association of Teachers of History and the Social Science Certificate of Excellence in History. Kark entered the Faculty of Law in 1984. In his third year of studies he served as a teaching assistant in Constitutional Law. After having completed all the requirements for the B.C.L. degree, Kark was killed in a tragic automobile accident in May 1987. He was awarded the B.C.L. degree posthumously in June 1987. The Kark Claxton, Jr. Memorial Award is intended to recognize Kark's friendship, good humour and generosity of spirit. It is awarded to a student having achieved distinguished standing in the third year of the law programme. Value: initially $750.
Law Faculty Scholarships Fund
- - Established in 1992 by the University to provide awards based on academic achievement to students in the top 5% of the Faculty. Granted by the Faculty of Law Scholarships Committee to equalize the value of awards to students of comparable standing. Awards range in value from $100 to the level of the major entrance scholarships in increments of $100.
Adolphe Mailhiot Memorial Prize
- - Established by Mr. and Mrs. J.N. Mailhiot of Victoriaville, QC, in 1927, to be used for the purchase of law books. Awarded to the student obtaining the highest standing in the first year of the Civil Law programme. Value: $100.
Jean Martineau Prize
- - Established by the law firm of Martineau Walker. Awarded to one student at the end of the first year of studies, on the basis of high academic achievement. Payable in two sums of $750 each at the end of the first year of studies and at the end of the second year of studies. Value: $1,500.
J.W. McConnell and James McGill Awards
- - Outstanding students are considered for the J.W. McConnel and James McGill Awards which range in value from $500 to $3,500. These awards are made by the University Scholarships Sub-Committee to top students as ranked and recommended by each faculty. In making such recommendations, faculties may consider programme content, number of credits, etc. in addition to GPA.
Alexander Morris Exhibition Prize
- - Founded in memory of the late Hon. Alexander Morris (1826-1889), B.A.(1849), B.C.L.(1850), M.A., D.C.L., first Chief Justice of the Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench and later first Lieutenant-Governor of Manitoba and the North West Territories. Awarded to the student who obtains the highest standing in the second year. Value: $475.
Lord Reading Society of Montreal Prize
- - Established in 1952, awarded to the student who obtains the highest standing in the first year. Value: $200.
16.2.2 Civil Law
Caron Memorial Prize
- Founded in 1978 by the Law Undergraduate Society, on behalf of the student body, to commemorate the late Professor Yves-Armand Caron who taught in the Faculty of Law from 1967 to 1977. It is awarded to the student who attains the highest academic achievement in the Civil Law courses related to the law of Security. Silver trophy donated by the Law Students' Association.
H. Eric Feigelson Obligations Prize
- Awarded annually to a first year student achieving the highest standing in the law of Obligations. Value: $100.
Daniel Mettarlin Memorial Scholarships
- Founded in 1985 in memory of Daniel Mettarlin, B.A.(1958), B.C.L.(1962), Notary and long time Sessional Lecturer in the Faculty of Law, by his family, friends and associates. Awarded to two students entering third or fourth year who have achieved academic distinction in the study of Civil Law and who have shown an interest in public interest advocacy. Value: $1,500 each.
Prix D'excellence Robinson Sheppard Shapiro
- Awarded to a student proceeding to the B.C.L. or LL.B. degree, for distinction in the law of Insurance. Value: $1,000.
Gerald S. Tritt, Q.C. Prize
- Established in 1961 by the family and friends of Mr. G.S. Tritt, B.C.L. (1907) and Mrs. Tritt and awarded to the student with the highest standing in the Special Contracts course. Value: $225.
16.2.3 Corporate, Commercial and Taxation Law
Allan Neil Assh Memorial Award
- Founded in 1983 by Mr. Maurice Assh in memory of his son, the late Allan Neil Assh, whose untimely accidental death occurred during his second year of study for the B.C.L. degree. Awarded to the student having the highest standing in the basic course in the law of Business Associations. Value: $650.
Bereskin and Parr Prize in Industrial and Intellectual Property
- Established in 1983 by the firm of Bereskin and Parr, Barristers and Solicitors, of Toronto. It is awarded to the student who achieves highest standing in the basic course in the Law of Intellectual and Industrial Property. In any year in which the course is not offered, the prize may be awarded instead for distinguished writing in the field. Value: $500.
Davies, Ward, Phillips & Vineberg LL.P
- Established in 2001 by the law firm Davies, Ward, Phillips & Vineberg LL.P. Awarded by the Faculty of Law to the student who has received the highest standing in the Securities Regulation course. Value: $2,000.
Desjardins Ducharme Stein Monast Scholarship
- Awarded to a student entering third year who, in the opinion of the Faculty of Law, has achieved high standing in the fields of Obligations and Commercial Law and who is, in the opinion of the Student Aid Office, in financial need. Value: $2,000.
Yoine Goldstein Book Prize in Bankruptcy and Insolvency Law
- Established in 1992 to mark the selection of Yoine Goldstein as the Honoree of the Lord Reading Society at the annual Human Rights Lecture on May 27, 1992 and to acknowledge Me Goldstein's ongoing contribution to his community and profession and his particular expertise in Bankruptcy and Insolvency Law. Awarded by the Faculty Council of the Faculty of Law to the student obtaining the highest mark in the Faculty's basic course in Bankruptcy and Insolvency law.
MacKay Award
- Established by the MacKay Family to reflect the work and legacy of Robert de Wolfe MacKay, Q.C. and awarded annually by the Faculty of Law to the student obtaining the highest standing in the course Corporate Taxation. Value: minimum $625.
Osler, Hoskin and Harcourt Prize in Corporate and Commercial Law
- Founded in 1983 by the firm of Osler, Hoskin and Harcourt, Barristers and Solicitors, of Toronto. It is awarded to a student who has achieved distinction in the fields of Corporate and Commercial Law. Value: $300.
Stikeman, Elliott/Carswell National Tax Award Prizes
- -Founded in 1993 by CARSWELL - Thomson Professional Publishing and the partners of the law firm Stikeman, Elliott. Awarded to two students entering third or fourth year for excellence in Taxation Law, but may also involve some emphasis in Corporate Law. Value: $750 each.
16.2.4 Evidence and Procedure
Brett Code Scholarship in Criminal Law
- Established in 2003 by Brett Code, LL.B. (1992), to recognize excellence and interest in the field of Criminal Law. Awarded by the Faculty of Law to an upper year student who has demonstrated broad interest, ability and achievement in criminal jurisprudence, including substantive, evidentiary and procedural law, sentencing and international criminal law. Value: $2,000.
Dawson A. McDonald, Q.C. Memorial Prize
- Established in 1986 in memory of the late Dawson A. McDonald, Q.C., B.A. (1915), B.C.L.(1920), City Attorney of the City of Montreal for many years, by his wife, Mrs. Margaret McDonald and Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton McDonald. In recognition of Mr. McDonald's skill as a trial advocate, this prize is awarded to the student obtaining the highest standing in the course Judicial Law and Evidence. Value: $250.
Montreal Bar Association Prizes
- One prize for the student who obtains the highest standing in Civil Law throughout the law programme and one for the student who obtains the highest standing in Civil Procedure throughout the law programme. Value: $300 each.
16.2.5 Internships, Law Journal and Mooting
John G. Ahern, Q.C. Memorial Award
- Established in 1979 by the Montreal law firm of Ahern, Nuss & Drymer in memory of its distinguished founder, John Gerard Ahern, Q.C., 1894-1978, B.C.L.(1918), who achieved during his long career at the Bar the reputation of being an outstanding advocate and who served as Bâtonnier of the Bar of Montreal and Quebec in 1955-56. Awarded for the most meritorious contribution to the Faculty's Mooting Programme. Value: $300.
I. Ballon Memorial Medal
- Established in 1955 by Mrs. I. Ballon in memory of her husband, the late Isidore Ballon, B.A. (1907), B.C.L.(1908). It is currently awarded to the most outstanding student on the Board of Editors of the McGill Law Journal/ Revue de droit de McGill.
Lindsey Anne Cameron Award
- Established in 2001 in loving memory of Lindsey Anne Cameron LL.B. 1999 (1973-2000) by her family, friends, classmates and the law firm Davis & Company in recognition of her commitment to social justice. Awarded by the Faculty of Law in consultation with the Student Aid office to an outstanding undergraduate student participating in human rights internship. Financial need will also be taken into consideration. Value: minimum $1,500.
Montreal Bar Mooting Prizes
- Three prizes for participants in the Faculty's annual Moot Court Competition, presented by the Montreal Bar Association. Value: one of $400, two of $200 each.
Nancy Park Memorial Prize
- Established in 2001 in loving memory of Nancy Park, LL.B. 1997 (1970-1998) by her family, friends and classmates, for an outstanding undergraduate student participating in a human rights internship. Ms. Park, who was deeply committed to social justice, held a special love for Russian literature and history. Awarded by the Faculty of Law on the basis of academic merit. Prefrence will be given to a student participating in an internship in Russia. Value: minimum $500.
Quebec Bar Prize
- Awarded to the winning team in the Faculty's annual Moot Court Competition. Presented by the Quebec Bar Association. Value: $200.
16.2.6 Legal Theory
Mr. Justice Harry Batshaw Prize
- Established in 1985 from the proceeds of a legacy of the Honourable Mr. Justice Batshaw of the Quebec Superior Court. Mr. Justice Batshaw was the son of immigrants and received his B.C.L. in 1924, graduating first in his class, and was recipient of the Elizabeth Torrance Gold Medal, the Macdonald Travelling Scholarship and the Montreal Bar Prize for Commercial Law. In 1949 he became the first Jew to be appointed to a Superior Court in Canada. He devoted much of his life to the fight for values of equality, human rights, non-discrimination and fairness under law, values derived from his Judaic tradition and Canadian experience.
- To commemorate the achievements of Mr. Justice Batshaw, the prize is awarded to the student having achieved the highest standing in the course Foundations of Canadian Law. Value: $200.
Fern Gertrude Kennedy Prize in Jurisprudence
- Established in 1981 in memory of the late Fern G. Kennedy. Awarded to a student who achieves high academic standing in the study of Jurisprudence and Legal Theory. The prize may also be awarded for distinguished writing, whether within a course or as a supervised essay. Value: $500.
Osgoode Society Legal History Book Prize
- Established by The Osgoode Society to be awarded to a student who, in the opinion of the Faculty, merits special recognition for work in legal history.
16.2.7 Public Law
H. Carl Goldenberg Scholarship
- Established in 1997 by Shirley and Edward Goldenberg in memory of her husband and his father, H. Carl Goldenberg, O.C., Q.C., B.A.(1928), M.A.(1929), B.C.L.(1932), Elizabeth Torrance Gold Medal (1932), LL.D.(1966), a distinguished contributor to Canadian public life. Awarded annually to a student in second or third year who has shown particular promise in the field of Canadian constitutional and administrative law and is in financial need. Awarded by the Student Aid Office in consultation with the Faculty of Law. Value: approximately $1,850.
Maurice Goldenberg Memorial Scholarship
- For studies in Government, Constitutional Law, or Public Administration, established by Senator H. Carl Goldenberg, Q.C., B.A.(1928), M.A. (1929), B.C.L.(1932), in memory of his father, the late Maurice Goldenberg. Awarded annually to the student who shows particular promise in the field of Constitutional and Public Law. Value: $800.
Hans Hermann Oppenheimer Scholarship in International Law
- Founded in 1996 by Tamar Oppenheimer, O.C., LL.D. in memory of her husband. Awarded annually to a student in second or third year who has shown particular promise in the field of Public International Law and is also in financial need. Awarded by the Student Aid Office in consultation with the Faculty of Law. Value: approximately $1,850.
F.R. Scott Prize in Constitutional Law
- Established in 1982, with an initial donation from the Honourable Donald J. Johnston, B.C.L.(1958), Robert S. Litvack, B.C.L. (1963), and Me André Brossard, Q.C., Bâtonnier of the Quebec Bar, in honour of Emeritus Professor F.R. Scott, C.C., Q.C., who was associated with the Faculty of Law for over 50 years and in recognition of his signal contribution to Canadian constitutional legal thought. It is awarded annually to the student who achieves the most distinguished standing in Constitutional Law in the undergraduate programme. Value: $950.
Stephen A. Scott Award in Constitutional Law
- Established in 2003 on the occasion of Professor Scott's retirement, by his colleagues, staff and current students, as a tribute to his dedication and loyalty throughout 35 years of service to the Faculty of Law. Awarded each year to the first year student most meritorious in the field of Constitutional Law. Value: minimum $750.
16.2.8 Other Course Prizes
Henry Benson Prize
- Established in 1986 by B. Robert Benson, Q.C. in memory of his father. Awarded to the student entering third year who achieves the highest standing in the fields of Constitutional Law, Obligations I, Obligations II, Civil Law Property, Torts, Contracts, Common Law Property, Criminal Law, Foundations of Canadian Law and National Civil Procedure, which at present comprise the entire obligatory content of the first two years of the programme. Value: $425.
16.2.9 Essays and Writing
Max Crestohl Prize
- Established in 1959 under the will of the late Max Nathan Zion Crestohl, Q.C., B.A.(1923). Awarded to the student who has submitted the best written contribution to the McGill Law Journal/Revue de droit de McGill. Value: $350.
J.S.D. Tory Writing Awards
- These awards may be given to one student or shared by up to four students. Established by the firm Tory, Tory, DesLauriers & Binnington in 1989 in memory of its founder, J.S.D. Tory. These awards are intended to support student writing in the Faculty of Law and to permit students having submitted outstanding term essays to revise such essays for publication. Value: a total of $2,000.
Wainwright Essay Prize
- Established under the bequest of the late Arnold Wainwright, Q.C. (1879-1967), B.A.(1899), B.C.L. (1902), D.C.L.(1963). Awarded for the best written contribution by an undergraduate law student, whether the contribution be an essay or other paper and whether written as an elective or as part of a course requirement, or voluntarily. This prize is intended to support student writing in the Faculty and to encourage a student having written an outstanding essay to revise such essay for publication. Value: $1,000.
16.2.10 Discretionary Awards, Prizes and Scholarships
Maurice Alexander Scholarship
- Bequeathed in 1950 by the late Maurice Alexander, C.M.G., K.C., of London, England, as a token of esteem for the late Sir Charles Peers Davidson, B.C.L.(1863), former Professor of Criminal law at McGill (1898-1919). Value: $400.
Borden Ladner Gervais Prize
- Awarded to a third-year law student for distinguished academic standing, combined with the involvement in the affairs of the Faculty. The Prize was created in 1995 by way of a donation from McMaster Meighen, one of the oldest law firms in Canada. The firm was founded in 1823, two years after the founding of McGill University itself, by William Badgley, who in 1844 was named in charge of teaching law at McGill in the Arts Faculty. In 1851 he was named as the first Professor of Law, and Dean of the Faculty of Law when it opened in 1853. The firm's second partner, Sir John Abbott, replaced him as Dean in 1855 and remained in that office for 25 years. In 1950, W.C.J. Meredith left the firm to become Dean, which position he held until his death in 1960. Value: $500.
Prix Souvenir George S. Challies - George S. Challies Memorial Award
- The following extract is taken from an address given by the Hon. Chief Justice Jules Deschênes of the Superior Court to the McGill Law Graduates Association on December 13th, 1973:
- Mr. Justice Challies, B.A.(1931), M.A.(1933), B.C.L.(1935), M.C.L.(1947), left us prematurely earlier this year and the judges of the Superior Court of the Province of Quebec have thought that they should erect a monument, however small, to his memory. Where then better than at his Alma Mater?
- We have, therefore, raised among ourselves a sum of money which it is our pleasure to donate to McGill University, for the money to be held in trust and the return valued at $300 to be given yearly to a deserving student under the name of "Prix Souvenir George S. Challies - George S. Challies Memorial Award".
- Value: $300.
Joseph Cohen, Q.C. Award
- Founded in 1962 by the friends and associates of Joseph Cohen, Q.C., this award is made to a deserving student. Value: $1,225.
Richard Golick Extracurricular Achievement Prize
- Established in 1988 and funded by the proceeds of the Law and You Seminars. Awarded to a second year student for leadership in extracurricular activities, particularly those extracurricular activities that bring recognition to the Faculty through service to the community. Value: $500.
Lyon William Jacobs, Q.C. Award
- Originally established in 1957 by Mr. and mrs. Alvin B. Jacobs, Mrs. Sybil Jacobs Phillips, Dr. and Mrs. Morris Lieff, and Mr. and Mrs. Newman Biller, in honour of the late Mr. Lyon W. Jacobs, Q.C., B.C.L.(1911). Awarded to a second or third year law student who shows the most progress in his studies and is also in financial need. Value: $500.
David Litner, Q.C. Scholarship
- Founded in 1987 to celebrate the 80th birthday of David Litner, Q.C., B.A.(1928), B.C.L.(1931), and in recognition of his more than 50 years of practice as a member of the Bar of Montreal. The scholarship was established by Me Litner's daughter Bluma Litner Rosenstein B.A., McGill; M.A., Université de Paris, son-in-law Mark Rosenstein B.A.(1960), B.C.L.(1963), and his grandson Noah Daniel Litner Rosenstein. This scholarship is awarded to a meritorious student entering second or third year who has made a significant contribution to the life of the Faculty. Value: $475.
McCarthy Tétrault Scholarship
- Presented by the law firm of McCarthy, Tétrault in memory of its founder, Eugène Lafleur, B.C.L.(1880), LL.D.(1921). Awarded annually to a student entering the year in which it is expected the B.C.L. degree will be obtained (whether the student is pursuing a purely B.C.L. programme or is taking the National Programme). Value: $1,500.
McGill Alumnae Society Prize
- Presented annually by the McGill Alumnae Society, upon the recommendation of the Law Faculty, to a distinguished student for excellence and high academic standing (preference given to women students). Value: $100.
Wilson and Lafleur (Limitée) Award
- Awarded to a deserving first year student. Value: $250.
16.2.11 For Financial Need
125th Anniversary Student Loan Fund
- - Established in 1979 through the generosity of graduates of the McGill Faculty of Law on the 125th Anniversary of the Faculty, to aid students in the Faculty who, during the course of the academic year are in serious need of emergency financial assistance and who are unable to obtain financial assistance from any other source. Application should be made to the University Student Aid Office.
Class of 1991 Bursary
- - Established by members of the Class of 1991 on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of their graduation from the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Student Aid Office to a returning student in a full-time undergraduate degree program in Law who demonstrates financial need and who is in good academic standing. Value: $2,000.
Louis De Zwirek, Q.C. Loan Fund
- - Established in 1969 by his widow in honour of her late husband from the Estate to aid students in the Faculty of Law. Application should be made to the University Student Aid Office.
A. Fleming Loan Fund
- - Established in 1954 by Mr. A. Fleming to aid students in the Faculty of Law. Application should be made to the University Student Aid Office.
Harold G. Fox Education Fund Bursaries
- - Established by donations from the Harold G. Fox Education Fund. To be awarded to needy law students in good standing. Application should be made to the University Student Aid Office.
Pearl Berman Greenspoon Scholarship
- - Established in 2000 by Albert Greenspoon, B.C.L. (1974), in memory of his beloved mother, Pearl Berman Greenspoon. Her selflessness, hard work and dedication to her children's education gave them the foundation upon which they could build productive lives. Awarded by the Student Aid Office on the basis of financial need to a student enrolled in a degree programme in the Faculty of Law. Preference will be given to students with an outstanding academic record and who are involved in community service. Value: minimum $2,000.
Derek A. Hanson, Q.C. Bursary
- - A bursary fund founded in 1987 by the class of 1957 on their 30th Anniversary in memory of Derek A. Hanson, B.C.L.(1957). The fund will sustain one or more bursaries awarded to students entering second year who have demonstrated financial need, and who have shown leadership in the academic and extra-curricular life of the Faculty. The bursary is renewable.
H.E. Herschorn Fund
- - The Student Aid Office may award a bursary from the interest of this fund to deserving students in the third or any subsequent year of their programme leading to the B.Sc.; B.A.; M.D.,C.M.; B.C.L.; or LL.B. degree.
Law Faculty General Bursary Fund
- - Established in 1992 by the University to provide assistance to students in the Faculty of Law. Awards are granted by the Student Aid Office on the basis of academic standing and financial need.
Law Prize Winners Bursary Fund/le Fond Des Lauréats
- - Established in 1987 by the Law prizewinners of the Class of '87 and the donors of endowed prizes within the Faculty of Law. The capital of the fund will be built each year through further contributions from each year's prizewinners and contributions drawn from unexpended income from existing and newly established prize endowments. The Fund will be used to support bursaries for students in the final year of their studies in the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Student Aid Office.
Law Students Association 150th Anniversary Bursaries
- - Established in 1999 by the Law Students Association with contributions from the 1999 graduating class, current students and alumni of the Faculty to mark the 150th Anniversary of the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Student Aid Office to returning students who demonstrate financial need and who are in good academic standing according to University regulations. Preference is given to students who are involved in extra-curricular activities. Value: minimum $1,500.
Miller, Thomson Bursary
- - Established in 1989 by the law firm of Miller, Thomson, Sedgewick, Lewis & Healy. Two bursaries will be awarded each year to meritorious students entering the second and third year of the LL.B. stream who have made a significant contribution to extra-curricular activities of a scholastic nature within the Faculty and who have financial need. Awarded by the Student Aid Office. Value: $250 each.
Charles Albert Nutting Bursary
- - Established in 1930 by Miss Adelaide Nutting, M.A., R.N., in memory of her brother, Charles Albert Nutting, K.C., B.C.L.(1872). Awarded by the Student Aid office to law students in good standing who have financial need.
Ernest E. Saunders, Q.C. Bursary Fund
- - A memorial bursary fund founded in 1988 by friends and colleagues of Ernest E. Saunders B.C.L.(1950), former Vice-President (Law and Corporate Affairs) of Bell Canada. The bursary is intended to recognize Ernie Saunder's belief in the role of law, his warmth and generosity of spirit and his abiding concern for those seeking a legal education. The fund will sustain one or more bursaries awarded to students entering second or third year who have demonstrated financial need and academic merit. Awarded by the Student Aid Office.
Joseph Treiger Memorial Award
- - Founded in 1974 by the Law Undergraduate Society, in memory of the late Joseph Murray Treiger, B.A.(Hons.) (1948-1973), a member of the Society whose untimely death occurred during the final year of his studies in the Faculty of Law. Awarded annually to a law undergraduate student who, at the beginning of the third year of undergraduate law studies, had demonstrated both financial need and an interest in serving the community. Awarded by the Director of Student Aid.
125th Anniversary Student Loan Fund
- - Established in 1979 through the generosity of graduates of the McGill Faculty of Law on the 125th Anniversary of the Faculty, to aid students in the Faculty who, during the course of the academic year are in serious need of emergency financial assistance and who are unable to obtain financial assistance from any other source. Application should be made to the University Student Aid Office.
Class of 1991 Bursary
- - Established by members of the Class of 1991 on the occasion of the 10th anniversary of their graduation from the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Student Aid Office to a returning student in a full-time undergraduate degree program in Law who demonstrates financial need and who is in good academic standing. Value: $2,000.
Louis De Zwirek, Q.C. Loan Fund
- - Established in 1969 by his widow in honour of her late husband from the Estate to aid students in the Faculty of Law. Application should be made to the University Student Aid Office.
A. Fleming Loan Fund
- - Established in 1954 by Mr. A. Fleming to aid students in the Faculty of Law. Application should be made to the University Student Aid Office.
Harold G. Fox Education Fund Bursaries
- - Established by donations from the Harold G. Fox Education Fund. To be awarded to needy law students in good standing. Application should be made to the University Student Aid Office.
Pearl Berman Greenspoon Scholarship
- - Established in 2000 by Albert Greenspoon, B.C.L. (1974), in memory of his beloved mother, Pearl Berman Greenspoon. Her selflessness, hard work and dedication to her children's education gave them the foundation upon which they could build productive lives. Awarded by the Student Aid Office on the basis of financial need to a student enrolled in a degree programme in the Faculty of Law. Preference will be given to students with an outstanding academic record and who are involved in community service. Value: minimum $2,000.
Derek A. Hanson, Q.C. Bursary
- - A bursary fund founded in 1987 by the class of 1957 on their 30th Anniversary in memory of Derek A. Hanson, B.C.L.(1957). The fund will sustain one or more bursaries awarded to students entering second year who have demonstrated financial need, and who have shown leadership in the academic and extra-curricular life of the Faculty. The bursary is renewable.
H.E. Herschorn Fund
- - The Student Aid Office may award a bursary from the interest of this fund to deserving students in the third or any subsequent year of their programme leading to the B.Sc.; B.A.; M.D.,C.M.; B.C.L.; or LL.B. degree.
Law Faculty General Bursary Fund
- - Established in 1992 by the University to provide assistance to students in the Faculty of Law. Awards are granted by the Student Aid Office on the basis of academic standing and financial need.
Law Prize Winners Bursary Fund/le Fond Des Lauréats
- - Established in 1987 by the Law prizewinners of the Class of '87 and the donors of endowed prizes within the Faculty of Law. The capital of the fund will be built each year through further contributions from each year's prizewinners and contributions drawn from unexpended income from existing and newly established prize endowments. The Fund will be used to support bursaries for students in the final year of their studies in the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Student Aid Office.
Law Students Association 150th Anniversary Bursaries
- - Established in 1999 by the Law Students Association with contributions from the 1999 graduating class, current students and alumni of the Faculty to mark the 150th Anniversary of the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Student Aid Office to returning students who demonstrate financial need and who are in good academic standing according to University regulations. Preference is given to students who are involved in extra-curricular activities. Value: minimum $1,500.
Miller, Thomson Bursary
- - Established in 1989 by the law firm of Miller, Thomson, Sedgewick, Lewis & Healy. Two bursaries will be awarded each year to meritorious students entering the second and third year of the LL.B. stream who have made a significant contribution to extra-curricular activities of a scholastic nature within the Faculty and who have financial need. Awarded by the Student Aid Office. Value: $250 each.
Charles Albert Nutting Bursary
- Established in 1930 by Miss Adelaide Nutting, M.A., R.N., in memory of her brother, Charles Albert Nutting, K.C., B.C.L.(1872). Awarded by the Student Aid office to law students in good standing who have financial need.
Ernest E. Saunders, Q.C. Bursary Fund
- A memorial bursary fund founded in 1988 by friends and colleagues of Ernest E. Saunders B.C.L.(1950), former Vice-President (Law and Corporate Affairs) of Bell Canada. The bursary is intended to recognize Ernie Saunder's belief in the role of law, his warmth and generosity of spirit and his abiding concern for those seeking a legal education. The fund will sustain one or more bursaries awarded to students entering second or third year who have demonstrated financial need and academic merit. Awarded by the Student Aid Office.
Joseph Treiger Memorial Award
- Founded in 1974 by the Law Undergraduate Society, in memory of the late Joseph Murray Treiger, B.A.(Hons.) (1948-1973), a member of the Society whose untimely death occurred during the final year of his studies in the Faculty of Law. Awarded annually to a law undergraduate student who, at the beginning of the third year of undergraduate law studies, had demonstrated both financial need and an interest in serving the community. Awarded by the Director of Student Aid.

16.3 Undergraduate Scholarships, Prizes and Student Aid for Graduating Students

Unless otherwise noted the following prizes are awarded by the Faculty of Law upon the recommendation of the Prizes and Scholarships Committee. These awards are given to McGill law undergraduates to assist in their pursuit of graduate studies at Faculties of Law other than McGill, or of a programme of professional training.

16.3.1 Standing in Programme (Medals)
David L. Johnston Gold Medal
- Established on the initiative of David P. Jones, Esq., Professor and Associate Dean of the Faculty of Law, to honour David Lloyd Johnston, who served as Principal from 1979-1994, the first of McGill's Principals to have a legal background. Awarded to the student who completes the McGill B.C.L./LL.B. programme with highly distinguished standing and having contributed in an outstanding manner to the Faculty in areas of academic, social and community life.
Aimé Geoffrion Medal
- Founded in 1977 by Mrs. H.E. Vautelet, C.B.E. in memory of her late father Aimé Geoffrion, K.C., B.C.L. (1893), D.C.L., of the Bar of the Province of Quebec. Aimé Geoffrion (1874-1946), the grandson of Sir Antoine Aimé Dorion who was Chief Justice of the Province, was awarded the Torrance Gold Medal upon his graduation from McGill with the B.C.L. degree in 1893; he served in the Faculty as a Lecturer in Obligations from 1898 to 1906 and as Professor from 1906 to 1919, at which time he was appointed Emeritus Professor. He was acknowledged early in his career at the Bar to be among the leading legal counsel in this Province and in Canada. He appeared before the Privy Council in some hundred cases involving constitutional issues, in which he was a recognized expert, and was renowned as an advocate in numerous celebrated civil and criminal cases.
- The medal is awarded to the student who completes the National Programme with the highest standing throughout the Programme and obtains, at a spring convocation, both the B.C.L. and LL.B. degrees simultaneously, or one of these degrees, having previously obtained the other.
Elizabeth Torrance Gold Medal
- Founded in 1864 by John Torrance, Esq., prominent Montreal merchant, in memory of his wife. Their son, Frederick William Torrance, of the Bar of the Province, was for many years professor of Roman Law in this Faculty and a judge of the Superior Court. It is awarded to the student who obtains, with the highest standing throughout the B.C.L. programme, the B.C.L. degree as the first law degree at a spring convocation.
16.3.2 Scholarships, Prizes and Student Aid
Board of Notaries Prize
- Founded in 1988 by the Board of Notaries of Quebec. The prize is awarded to a student graduating with a B.C.L. degree who has achieved distinguished standing in the group of courses comprising the Faculty's programme in the Law of Persons and the Family and who registers for either Diploma Programme or Masters Programme in Notarial Law. Value: $1,000.
Carswell Prizes
- A book prize of $300 established in 1948 by Carswell Company Limited, awarded to a student in the graduating class. There are two further book prizes of $150 each, established in 1973 by the Company and awarded to a lower year student.
Maxwell Cohen O.C., Q.C. Award
- Awarded to a student in the graduating class who has demonstrated overall highest academic achievement in the course in public international law and in at least one advanced course in the area of public international law. Value: $1,000.
Nathan Cotler Memorial Prize in Human Rights Law
- Established in 1985 in memory of Nat Cotler, Q.C., B.A.(1926), B.C.L. (1929) by his family. Awarded annually to the graduating student who achieves the highest standing in the field of Human Rights throughout the Programme. Value: $325.
Philip Meyerovitch, Q.C. Prize
- Established in 1972 by the wife and children of Philip Meyerovitch, Q.C., B.C.L.(1921), to commemorate his 50 years of practice before the Bar of the Province of Quebec. Awarded to the graduating student obtaining the highest standing in Evidence. Value: $100.
Cheryl Rosa Teresa Doran Award
- Established in 1989 by Cheryl Rosa's family, Teresa, Robert and John Doran, aunts and uncles, Rosa, Nino and Roberto Gualtieri, all graduates of McGill University, Margot Gualtieri and colleagues and friends in recognition of the exemplary life and accomplishments of Cheryl Rosa Teresa Doran, B.A. with distinction, Carleton (1979), LL.B., B.C.L. (National Programme) (1984), and called to the Bar of Quebec in 1985. The award is given annually to a deserving graduating student on the basis of academic merit, steadfastness, and dedication to the profession of law. Value: $450.
Chief Justice Greenshields Prize in Criminal Law
- Endowed by the late Mrs. Greenshields in 1943 in memory of her husband, the late Chief Justice Robert Alfred Ernest Greenshields, B.A. (1883), B.C.L.(1885), D.C.L., LL.D., for many years professor of Criminal Law and Dean of the Faculty of Law. Awarded to the member of the graduating class in Law having the highest standing in Criminal Law throughout the law programme. Value: $350.
Rosa B. Gualtieri Prize
- Founded in 1978 by Rosa B. Gualtieri, B.A.(1948), B.C.L.(1951). To be awarded to a graduating student deemed to deserve because of high academic standing and exceptional personal qualities as demonstrated in the graduating year or throughout the course regardless of which undergraduate degree programme the student has followed. Value: $425.
H.E. Herschorn Prize
- Established By Mr. H.E. Herschorn, N.P., B.A.(1911), B.C.L.(1914). Awarded to the highest ranking graduating student who intends to enter the Notarial Profession. Value: $900.
"I.M.E." Prize in Commercial Law
- A prize to enable a student to purchase law books, established by Mr. George S. McFadden, Q.C., in memory of Irene Metcalfe Esler, awarded to the member of the graduating class having the highest standing in Commercial Law throughout the programme. Value: $1,550.
William Kagan Memorial Prize
- Established in 2000 by Miriam Kagan, B.C.L./LL.B.(1990), in memory of her father, William Kagan. Awarded by the Faculty of Law to a graduating undergraduate law student who has achieved distinction in the study of Real Estate Law. Value: minimum $500.
Stanley Kandestin, Q.C. Prize
- Established in 2000 in memory of Stanley Kandestin, Q.C., B.C.L. (1950) by his family and friends. Stanley Kandestin, Q.C., was a well-known, respected member of Montreal's legal community during his half-century of practice, left the law firm he helped shape as a legacy to his profession, and passed on his love of practising law to his sons, Gerald, B.C.L.(1974) and Robert, B.C.L.(1977), LL.B. (1978). Awarded annually by the Faculty of Law to a graduating student who has achieved a distinguished academic record and who has made a significant contribution to the life of the Faculty. Value: minimum $500.
Elizabeth Carmichael Monk, Q.C. Property Law Prize
- Established in 1979 by associates and friends of Elizabeth Carmichael Monk, Q.C., B.A.(1919), B.C.L.(1923), LL.D.(1975), a distinguished lawyer involved in the practice of law for more than 55 years. Awarded to a graduating student who achieves high standing in the law of Property throughout the programme. Value: $650.
Louis H. Rohrlick Memorial Prize
- Established by associates of the late Louis H. Rohrlick, Q.C., B.A. (1922), B.C.L.(1925) in his memory, to be awarded to the student in the graduating class having the highest standing in Public International Law throughout the programme. Value: $375.
Thomas Alexander Rowat Scholarship
- Founded by Mr. Donald McKenzie Rowart, N.P., in memory of his brother, Lieutenant Thomas Alexander Rowat, B.C.L., who was killed in action at Lens, France, on June 28, 1917. To be awarded for proficiency in French and in the Civil Law on conditions set from time to time by the Faculty. It is at present awarded to a student who has shown the most progress in the French language and proficiency in the Civil Law either by attaining a high aggregate standing in the group of courses consisting of Obligations and Property, or through the submission of a meritorious written contribution on a civil law subject in French, whether the contribution be a term essay or paper written as part of a course requirement. Value: $1,550.
Philip F. Vineberg, O.C., Q.C. Award
- Established by Robert and Michael Vineberg in 1984 to commemorate the 70th birthday of their father, Philip F. Vineberg, O.C., Q.C., LL.D., B.A.(1935), M.A.(1936), B.C.L.(1939), Elizabeth Torrance Gold Medal (1939). Awarded each year to a graduating student having achieved distinction in the fields of Corporate Law and Taxation. Value: $625.
16.3.3 Scholarships and Awards to Pursue Further Study or Professional Development
Edwin Botsford Busteed Scholarship
- Founded by the will of the late Mrs. Busteed in memory of her husband, Edwin Botsford Busteed, K.C., B.A., B.C.L.(1879), this scholarship will be awarded to an applicant, chosen by the Faculty, who desires to carry out graduate research on some subject connected with the law of Quebec and approved by the Faculty. The scholarship can be used to supplement funds for graduate studies already received from other sources. Candidates should make application for this scholarship through the Office of Undergraduate Studies. Value: approximately $5,400.
John W. Cook, K.C. Prize
- Awarded annually to an outstanding member of the graduating class in law in memory of the late John W. Cook, K.C., B.C.L.(1897), on the basis of high academic standing throughout the programme, participation in Faculty activities and possible postgraduate intentions. Candidates may indicate their eligibility for this award through the Office of Undergraduate Studies. Value: $2,500.
John E. Crankshaw Prize
- Established by friends of the late John E. Crankshaw, Q.C., B.C.L.(1920), formerly lecturer in Criminal Law at McGill, the prize is to be applied to Bar fees, advocate's gown and any other needs. Awarded annually to the student who has the highest standing in Criminal Law subjects at McGill and who is then admitted to the Bar of the Province of Quebec. Value: $1,600.
Gualtieri-Doran Award
- Established in 1999 by Dr. Domenico John Doran in memory of his aunt, Rosa Bianca Gualtieri, B.A.(1948), B.C.L.(1951) and his sister, Cheryl Rosa Teresa Doran, LL.B./B.C.L.(1984) who practised law together. The award is a testament to their contribution to the profession of law, their accomplishments, and their dedication to family and friends. Awarded by the Student Aid Office, on the basis of academic merit and financial need, to a McGill Law graduate who wishes to pursue graduate studies in Law or another Faculty at McGill. Preference will be given to students who have made a distinctive contribution to the legal profession or the wider community.
Macdonald Travelling Scholarship
- Founded by the will of the late Sir William Macdonald "for the purpose of enabling the English-speaking Law Students to take a course of studies in France", the testator deeming "it of great importance that the English-speaking members of the legal profession should be proficient in the French language". The scholar selected is required to pursue a programme of studies in a French university that has received the approval of the Faculty. The award is made to a member of the graduating class or of a recent class who has achieved a distinguished academic record in the Faculty. Preference will be shown to candidates preparing for the legal profession or for a university career in law in Canada and who would be unable to spend a year in France without such financial help. Applications for this scholarship should be made through the Undergraduate Students Office. Value: approximately $24,000.
Thomas Shearer Stewart Travelling Fellowship
- Established in 1967 by the family of the late Thomas Shearer Stewart, Q.C., a graduate of the Faculty of Law class of 1908. The fellowship is to be awarded annually to a recent graduate of the Faculty of Law designated by the Dean of the Faculty, preference being given to a graduate who is a Canadian citizen intending to reside in Canada upon completion of his/her studies. The fellowship is to be used for a graduate to follow a programme of studies in Law at a university approved by the Dean of the Faculty, other than at a university in Quebec. Candidates should make application for this fellowship through the Office of Undergraduate Studies. Value: not less than $12,000.
Spiegel Sohmer Taxation Scholarship
- Established by the Montreal law firm of Spiegel, Sohmer to advance the study and practice of Taxation Law. Awarded to a member of the graduating class on the basis of distinction in the field of Taxation throughout the programme and interest in the study of Taxation as a legal discipline, including possible postgraduate intentions. Candidates may indicate their eligibility for this award through the Office of Undergraduate Studies. Value: $1,400.

16.4 Dean's Honour List

Each year a maximum of the top 10% of the students in each faculty, based on the sessional GPA, are named to the Dean's Honour List. While carrying no monetary value, this designation is noted on all University Transcripts.

A maximum of the top 10% of the graduating students in each faculty are named to the Dean's Honour List. This honorary designation is based upon the cumulative academic record in the graduating faculty and the minimum required CGPA is determined annually by each faculty. Individual faculties should be consulted regarding any additional criteria which may be used. Law students should consult the Associate Dean (Academic).

16.5 Graduate Scholarships, Prizes and Student Aid for Entering Students

Clive V. Allen Fellowship
- Established in 1999 through a generous gift by Nortel Networks in honour of its former Chief Legal Officer, Clive V. Allen, B.A.(1956), B.C.L.(1959). Awarded by the Faculty of Law to a student entering the first year of graduate studies in the institute of Comparative Law and specializing in International Business Law. Value: minimum $5,000.
John and Edmund Day Award for Graduate Studies in Law
- Established in 1996 by a generous bequest by Isabelle Day in memory of her grandfather, Edmund Thomas Day and her great-grandfather, John James Day, both graduates of the Faculty of Law. Awarded by the Faculty of Law to a graduate student in Law. Value: $2,000 - $5,000.
Chief Justice R.A. Greenshields Memorial Scholarships For Graduate Studies
- Bequeathed by Mrs. R.A.E. Greenshields in memory of her husband Chief Justice Greenshields,B.A., B.C.L., LL.B. and D.C.L. to outstanding students entering the first year of graduate studies in the Faculty. Value: $5,000 renewable on a fully competitive basis.
Saul Hayes Graduate Fellowship
- Endowed by Edgar and Charles Bronfman in memory of Saul Hayes, for graduate studies in areas of Civil Liberties and Human Rights, and tenable for up to four years. Application should be made to the Graduate and Post-Doctoral Studies Office. Value: ranging from $7,500 to $8,500.
Robert E. Morrow, Q.C., Fellowships
- Established in 1999 by friends and colleagues of Robert E. Morrow, QC, B.C.L. (1947). Awarded by the Faculty of Law to outstanding students entering the first year of graduate studies in the Institute of Air and Space Law. Value: minimum $5,000.
Aubrey Senez Scholarship
- Bequeathed by Aubrey Senez for a student entering a graduate programme in the Faculty of Law, specializing in International Business Law. Preference is given to students from Montreal's South Shore. Awarded by the Graduate and Post-Doctoral Studies Office in consultation with the Faculty of Law. Value: minimum $10,000; renewable.

16.6 Graduate Scholarships, Prizes and Student Aid for Continuing Students

Jose Bogolasky Memorial Prize in International Air Law
- -Established by the friends and colleagues of José Bogolasky, LL.M.(1976) who passed away suddenly in Santiago, Chile in 1987. A book prize awarded to the student in the Master's or Diploma programme in the Institute of Air and Space Law achieving the highest standing in Public International Air Law.
Institute of Comparative Law Essay Prize
- Founded in 1993 by the Alumni Association of the Institute. An annual prize awarded on the recommendation of the Institute of Comparative Law to a student, in the first year of residence in the Institute, submitting a term essay of outstanding quality. Value: $250.
Chief Justice R.A. Greenshields Memorial Scholarships For Graduate Studies
- Bequeathed by Mrs. R.A.E. Greenshields in memory of her husband Chief Justice Greenshields, B.A., B.C.L., LL.B. and D.C.L. The thesis research scholarships are for outstanding Master's students who have begun their thesis and need funds to defray research expenses. Value: $1,000.
Nicolas Mateesco Matte Prize
- Founded in 1978 by Dr. Nicholas M. Matte, O.C., Q.C. An annual prize awarded to an Institute of Air and Space Law student obtaining the highest mark in the course "Space Law and Institutions". Value: $350.
Aubrey Senez Bursary
- Bequeathed by Aubrey Senez to provide financial assistance to a student enrolled in a Faculty of Law graduate programme. Preference is given to business law students and students from Montreal's South Shore. Awarded by the Student Aid Office in consultation with the Faculty of Law. Value: maximum $2,500.
Setsuko Ushioda-Aoki Prize
- Established in 2001 by Dr. Setsuko Ushioda-Aoki (D.C.L. 1993). Awarded by the Faculty of Law on the basis of academic merit to a graduate student in the LL.M. programme at the Institute of Air and Space Law. Value: $500.

16.7 Awarding of Scholarships, Prizes and Student Aid

All prizes, bursaries, scholarships and medals within the Faculty of Law are awarded at the discretion of the Faculty. Where the Faculty determines that there is no candidate of sufficient merit, it may decline to award any prize, bursary, scholarship or medal.

17 Graduate Programs of Study

17.1 Programs Offered

Graduate programs in law are offered through the Faculty of Law and its two teaching Institutes, the Institute of Air and Space Law and the Institute of Comparative Law. The degrees offered are the LL.M. (Master of Laws) and the D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Law). Both Institutes also offer a Graduate Certificate.

The Institute of Air and Space Law

operates within the Faculty of Law. The Institute provides facilities for advanced study and research in Air and Space Law and related problems of international law for qualified law graduates or others with appropriate qualifications. The Institute is also responsible to GPSO for graduate students. The Institute offers a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law and the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.) and Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.).

The Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law is a course work program with a limited research and writing requirement. It is particularly appropriate for students with a strong professional orientation who do not wish to write a thesis.

The Institute of Comparative Law

operates within the Faculty of Law. As a centre of comparative legal studies, the Institute provides facilities for graduate work, advanced studies and field research in areas of private, commercial, international and public law. The Institute is also responsible to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office for graduate studies. The Institute offers a Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law and the degrees of Master of Laws (LL.M.), Master of Laws (LL.M.) with specialization in Bioethics, Master of Civil Law (M.C.L.) and of Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.). (Please note: the M.C.L. is not currently being offered.)

The Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law provides advanced training in subjects within the scope of the ICL to candidates who do not wish to undertake the Master's degree. The Graduate Certificate is particularly appropriate for judges, law professors, and legal practitioners from countries undergoing substantial legal reform (such as post-Communist or developing countries) who wish to pursue advanced studies in areas such as civil, commercial, or human rights law.

17.2 Admission Requirements

General

The Faculty of Law has a Graduate Admissions Committee that makes recommendations regarding admission to the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office. Final admissions decisions are taken by the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office, in the months of March and April.

For information and application forms please consult the Faculty Web site or write to the Coordinator, Graduate Studies in Law, McGill University at the above address.

Language Requirement

All graduate students must have very good knowledge of English.

Non-Canadian applicants must provide proof of competence in oral and written English. An official test score is required unless (a) the applicant's mother tongue is English, or (b) the applicant has completed an undergraduate degree from a recognized institution where English is the language of instruction. Tests recognized are the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) and the IELTS (International English Language Testing System). Non-native Canadian applicants must have completed an undergraduate degree in a French or English Canadian institution in order to be exempted from the above.

Generally, applicants must achieve a minimum TOEFL score of 600 (250 on the computer-based test) or 7.5 in the IELTS. There are, however, some exceptions: - in the IASL: applicants must achieve a minimum TOEFL score of 575 (233 on the computer-based test) or 7.0 overall band in the IELTS.

In all programs, non-Canadian applicants whose mother tongue is French must achieve a minimum TOEFL score of 550 (213 computer-based) or an IELTS score of 6.5 overall band. This is because at McGill, students can write essays, examinations and theses in French, even where the course is taught in English. All students should be aware that the majority of courses in Graduate Programmes in Law are taught in English.

For information about the TOEFL, and to register to take the test, see http://www.toefl.org. For information about the IELTS, see http://www.ielts.org. There may be a lengthy delay for registration, and the communication of results takes approximately 40 days. For both tests, the official results should be sent directly from the testing institution to Graduate Programmes in Law. For the TOEFL, McGill's institutional code is 0935 and Law's departmental code is 03. These codes must be provided to TOEFL when requesting a test report form. For the IELTS, applicants must ask for an official report to be sent to Graduate Programmes in Law at the above address. For either test, the test must be taken sufficiently early for results to reach McGill no later than March 15 of the year of admission. Application files not completed by that date will not be considered.

French: The ability to speak or read French is an asset but not a necessity. In areas such as the study of private law in the civilian tradition or comparative private law, a reading knowledge of French is essential. Applicants should indicate their knowledge of French on the admissions questionnaire; they will be notified if French is essential to the area of study.

Graduate Certificate Programs

The requirements for admission to the Graduate Certificate programs are essentially the same as for the Master's programs, except that greater weight may be placed on professional experience.

Candidates desiring a Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law who do not hold a law degree may be admitted if they have earned an undergraduate university degree in another discipline and possess sufficient professional experience to compensate for the lack of a law degree (as determined by the Graduate Admissions Committee).

Master's Degrees

Candidates for admission to the LL.M. program must hold a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) degree, or its equivalent, with at least upper second class honours. This standing does not guarantee admission, however. The Graduate Admissions Committee weighs the entire file, including the applicant's references and the quality of the research proposal.

Furthermore, in the case of thesis programs, the Committee must consider the availability of a supervisor. If a supervisor is not available in the applicant's preferred field of study, the applicant may be refused admission or else offered admission pending a change of field of study.

LL.M. specialization in Bioethics:

Requirements for admission to the Master's program in Bioethics from the base discipline Law, are the same as for admission to the LL.M.

For further information see the bioethics section of the calendar, or contact the Chair, Master's Specialization in Bioethics, Biomedical Ethics Unit, 3647 Peel Street, Montreal, QC, H3A 1W9. Telephone: (514) 398-6980; Fax: (514) 398-8349; E-mail: Glass@falaw.lan.mcgill.ca.

D.C.L. Degree

Applicants demonstrating outstanding academic ability will be considered for admission to the doctoral program.

Admission to the DCL program occurs only when:

a) the candidate has completed a graduate law degree with thesis at McGill or at another university, and
b) the Graduate Admissions Committee is satisfied that the quality of his or her previous research is sufficient to justify admission to a doctoral program.

The latter usually requires review of the completed Master's thesis.

17.3 Application Procedures

An application will be considered upon receipt of:

1. application form;
2. statement of academic program and brief resume;
3. official transcripts and proof of degree;
4. certified translations of transcripts and proof of degree (if not written in French or English);
5. letters of reference on forms provided for that purpose and/or official letterhead (sent directly by the referee to Graduate Programs in Law);
6. $60 application fee;
7. official TOEFL or IELTS score report (sent directly by the testing organization).

McGill's on-line application form for graduate program candidates is available at www.mcgill.ca/applying/graduate. Documents corresponding to numbers 2-5 and 7 should be sent to the Coordinator, Graduate Studies in Law, at the above address.

Deadline:

March 1st in the year prior to the start of the academic year for which the candidate is applying.

LL.M. specialization in Bioethics

Applications are made initially through the Biomedical Ethics Unit in the Faculty of Medicine, which administers the program and teaches the core courses.

Applicants must be accepted first by Law and then by the Bioethics Graduate Studies Advisory Committee.

17.4 Program Requirements

Graduate Certificate in Comparative Law

The Graduate Certificate is awarded after at least one term of residence in the Faculty and upon completion of a minimum of 15 academic credits. At least nine of those credits must be earned through course work, with the balance earned through essays or the preparation of teaching or course materials. In every case, the program is structured to meet individual needs and must be approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies).

Note: International students must register for at least 12 credits per term in order to satisfy visa requirements.

Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law

The Graduate Certificate in Air and Space Law is a course work program with a limited research and writing requirement. It is particularly appropriate for students with a strong professional orientation who do not wish to write a thesis.

The Graduate Certificate is awarded after at least one term of residence in the Faculty and upon completion of a minimum of 15 academic credits of law courses. Those credits must include the three air and space law courses obligatory for Master's students (ASPL 633, ASPL 636, and ASPL 637).

The required courses are offered in the fall, hence Graduate Certificate students must be in residence during at least one Fall term. The balance of required graduate credits can be obtained either through other IASL courses, Independent Study courses, or any other course in the University or other universities related to the area of concentration, subject to approval by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies and Research). Students may take courses beyond the minimum of 15 credits, and these additional courses may be non-law courses.

Graduate Certificate students generally remain in residence for both terms and take all of the air and space law courses.

Note: International students must register for at least 12 credits per term in order to satisfy visa requirements.

MASTER'S DEGREES

There are two LL.M. options in the Faculty of Law: thesis and non-thesis. In each case, the student must complete 45 credits. It is not normally possible to take extra credits. Students pursuing the LL.M. (thesis and non-thesis) in the Faculty must take the following courses: Legal Research Methodology (4 credits) and Theoretical Approaches to Law (4 credits). Other courses are selected from those offered by the Faculty and its Institutes, subject to the approval of the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies) of the Faculty of Law.

Students must register and pay fees for three terms of full-time study. Usually courses are taken during the first two terms only. The third term, devoted to research, may be taken during the summer session of the first year, if the thesis or Project supervisor approves. This means that it may be possible to complete the three terms within one calendar year.

Candidates who complete all courses required of them with a grade of at least B- (65%) may normally proceed to the submission of their Master's thesis on a subject approved by the Director or the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies). In some cases, candidates may be required to undergo an oral examination before a jury appointed by their Director or the Associate Dean.

Thesis Option

The thesis option is more suited to students who wish to work on a project of original scholarly research, and are less concerned to take a larger number of taught courses. The thesis topic is normally determined in consultation with the supervisor and must be approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies). The completed thesis is evaluated by the candidate's supervisor and by an external examiner chosen by the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office. The thesis must show familiarity with work in the field and demonstrate the student's ability for organizing results and solid, independent analysis.

In the LL.M. (thesis), the work on the thesis is recognized through "thesis courses"of different credit weights, ranging from 30 to 33 credits. The student must therefore take 12 to 15 credits of other courses.

The Master's Thesis programs consist of a course work component and a thesis of approximately 100 pages. Candidates must remain in residence for three terms. The third term, usually devoted to the thesis research,, may be taken the summer of the first year, making it possible to complete residence requirements within one calendar year. If the thesis is not completed within in this time, students must register for additional sessions as needed. All degree requirements must be completed within three years of the date of registration.

As part of Master's Thesis 1, a thesis candidate must provide a protocol to his or her supervisor setting out details as to the thesis topic, the deadlines for the completion of the various thesis courses and the schedule of meetings with the thesis supervisor. Modifications to the protocol must be made in writing and submitted to the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies).

The thesis topic is normally determined in consultation with the supervisor early in the second term and must be approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies). The submitted thesis is evaluated by the candidate's supervisor and an external examiner chosen by the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office. The thesis must show familiarity with previous work in the field and demonstrate the student's capacity for solid, independent analysis and for organizing results.

Non-Thesis Option

The non-thesis option is more suited to students who wish to have a wide exposure to a range of taught courses, and are less concerned to have the chance to do a piece of original scholarly research. The non-thesis option does require a substantial Supervised Research Project and students take more courses than students in the thesis program.

The LL.M. (non-thesis) includes a Supervised Research Project which counts for 18 credits, although it can be reduced to 15, 16 or 17 if a student wishes to take more taught course credits. The student must therefore take 27 to 30 credits of other courses.

Institute of Air and Space Law
Master of Laws (LL.M.)

The student must take at least 18 credits of courses. Normally the student will take the following courses:

ASPL 636
(3)
Private International Air Law
ASPL 633
(3)
Public International Air Law
ASPL 637
(3)
Space Law: General Principles
ASPL 632*
(3)
Comparative Air Law
ASPL 613*
(3)
Government Regulation of Air Transport
ASPL 638*
(3)
Law of Space Applications
ASPL 639*
(3)
Government Regulation of Space Activities

* On occasion, students will be permitted to substitute for any of the asterisked courses, other courses selected from a list of Faculty or Institute of Comparative Law courses or courses offered by another department of the University.

Each student's final choice of curriculum is subject to the approval of the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies).

Thesis Component - Required
(27 credits)
ASPL 690
(3)
Master's Thesis 1
ASPL 691
(3)
Master's Thesis 2
ASPL 692
(6)
Master's Thesis 3
ASPL 693
(12)
Master's Thesis 4
ASPL 694
(3)
Master's Thesis 5

The LL.M. student must present an acceptable thesis on a subject approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies). Work on the Master's thesis is divided into five courses, and is conducted under the close supervision of a member of Faculty. To be allowed to submit a thesis, a student must have obtained at least B- (65%) in each of the courses taken.

Candidates for the Master's degree must spend three terms of full-time study and research in residence at the Institute.

The Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law - Thesis

is a 45-credit program that requires some foundational course work, but its core is a substantial thesis (up to 100 pages) to be credited at 30 credits (or more in exceptional cases). Required courses are:

CMPL 610
(4)
Legal Research Methodology
CMPL 641
(4)
Theoretical Approaches to Law
CMPL 612
(3)
Master's Thesis 1
CMPL 613
(3)
Master's Thesis 2
CMPL 614
(3)
Master's Thesis 3
CMPL 615
(6)
Master's Thesis 4
CMPL 616
(12)
Master's Thesis 5
CMPL 617
(3)
Master's Thesis 6

If approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies), students may reduce their elective course work by up to 3 credits by completing one or both of:

CMPL 618
(2)
Master's Thesis 7
CMPL 619
(1)
Master's Thesis 8

The remaining 7 credits (or fewer if more credits are earned for the Master's Thesis) are elective, with courses to be chosen from among Faculty offerings. Courses below 500 level will not normally be approved.

The Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law - non-Thesis

is a 45-credit program that combines a significant body of course work with a substantial guided research project.

CMPL 610
(4)
Legal Research Methodology
CMPL 641
(4)
Theoretical Approaches to Law
CMPL 655
(15)
Research Project 1

If approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies), students may reduce their elective course work by up to 3 credits by completing one or both of:

CMPL 656
(2)
Research Project 2
CMPL 657
(1)
Research Project 3

The remaining 22 credits (or fewer if more credits are earned for the research project) are elective, with courses to be chosen from among Faculty offerings. Courses below 500 level will not normally be approved.

The Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law; Comparative Law - Thesis

is a 45-credit program that requires some foundational course work, but its core is a substantial thesis (up to 100 pages) to be credited at 30 credits (or more in exceptional cases):

CMPL 600
(4)
Legal Traditions
CMPL 610
(4)
Legal Research Methodology
CMPL 641
(4)
Theoretical Approaches to Law
CMPL 612
(3)
Master's Thesis 1
CMPL 613
(3)
Master's Thesis 2
CMPL 614
(3)
Master's Thesis 3
CMPL 615
(6)
Master's Thesis 4
CMPL 616
(12)
Master's Thesis 5
CMPL 617
(3)
Master's Thesis 6

If approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies), students may reduce their elective course work by up to 3 credits by completing one or both of:

CMPL 618
(2)
Master's Thesis 7
CMPL 619
(1)
Master's Thesis 8

The remaining 3 credits (or fewer if more credits are earned for the Master's Thesis) are elective, with courses to be chosen from among Faculty offerings. Courses below 500 level will not normally be approved.

The Master of Laws (LL.M.); Law; Comparative Law - non-Thesis

is a 45-credit program that combines a significant body of course work with a substantial guided research project.

CMPL 600
(4)
Legal Traditions
CMPL 610
(4)
Legal Research Methodology
CMPL 641
(4)
Theoretical Approaches to Law
CMPL 655
(15)
Research Project 1

If approved by the Associate Dean (Graduate Studies), students may reduce their elective course work by up to 3 credits by completing one or both of:

CMPL 656
(2)
Research Project 2
CMPL 657
(1)
Research Project 3

The remaining 18 credits (or fewer if more credits are earned for the research project) are elective, with courses to be chosen from among Faculty offerings. Courses below 500 level will not normally be approved.

COURSE SELECTION

It should be noted that not all courses are offered in each year. Students wishing to pursue research topics outside of these particular fields are welcome to do so, subject to the availability of appropriate thesis supervisors.

The graduate-level Law courses are grouped into four inter-related concentrations.

Legal Traditions and Legal Theory

This concentration combines two areas of strength: the co-existence of diverse legal traditions, particularly (but not exclusively) the civil and common law, and the awareness of the importance of theoretical approaches to law as a means of understanding both the internal dynamic of legal phenomena and their relationship to other social phenomena.

Courses offered within this concentration include:

Aboriginal Peoples and the Law
Advanced Jurisprudence
Canadian Legal History
Canon Law
Comparative Modern Legal History
Feminist Legal Theory
Islamic Law
Jurisprudence
Legal Theory
Linguistic and Literary Approaches to the Law
Research Seminars
Roman Law
Social and Ethical Issues in Jewish Law
Social Diversity and the Law
Talmudic Law
Tort Theory
International Business Law

The ICL pioneered the first graduate concentration in international business law in Canada. This field has practical significance in international business relations and also provides opportunities to apply experience derived from multiple legal systems to the development of multi-jurisdictional, "international" commercial rules.

Courses offered within this concentration include:

Comparative Legal Institutions
European Community Law 1
European Community Law 2
International Business Enterprises
International Carriage of Goods by Sea
International Development Law
International and Domestic Documentary Sales
International Maritime Conventions
International Securities Markets
International Taxation
Law and Practice of International Trade
Research Seminars
Resolution of International Disputes
Human Rights and Cultural Diversity

Building on the Faculty's strength in public law, this concentration promotes the comparative study of human rights law. It provides students with opportunities to reflect critically on the emergence and institutionalization of human rights norms in both domestic and international settings and to explore complexities arising from cultural diversity.

Courses offered within this concentration include:

Aboriginal Peoples and the Law
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
Children and the Law
Civil Liberties
Comparative Constitutional Protection of Human Rights
Comparative and International Protection of Minorities' Rights
Current Problems of the International Legal Order
Discrimination and the Law
International Law of Human Rights
Research Seminars
Social Diversity and Law
Regulation, Technology and Society

This concentration focuses on the comparative and inter-disciplinary study of legal regulation in areas of rapid technological change. It encourages critical reflection on notions of the public interest and its protection in areas as diverse as the bio-medical sciences, the environment, the growth of computer networks, and the commercial exploitation of space.

Courses offered within this concentration include:

Administrative Process
Communications Law
Comparative Medical Law
Computers and the Law
Contemporary Private Law Problems 1
Entertainment Law
Environment and the Law
Government Control of Business
Intellectual and Industrial Property
International Environmental Law
Land Use Planning
Policies, Politics and the Legislative Process
Research Seminars
LL.M. in Law - Bioethics option:

The curriculum is composed of required courses (for 6 credits) offered in the Biomedical Ethics Unit, bioethics courses (3 credit minimum) offered by the base faculty or department (for Faculty of Law: CMPL 642), and any graduate courses required or accepted by a base faculty for the granting of a Master's degree for a total of 18 to 21 credits (for Faculty of Law: CMPL 641, with remaining credits chosen from Faculty of Law and Bioethics offerings at the 500 or 600 level). A minimum of 45 credits is required including the thesis. For further information regarding this program, please refer to the Bioethics section.

DOCTOR OF CIVIL LAW (D.C.L.) DEGREE

The Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) in Air and Space Law

is the doctoral program in the Institute of Air and Space Law of the Faculty of Law. The core of the program is a substantial thesis that makes an original contribution to legal scholarship. Students must pass a Comprehensive Exam - Air/Space Law (ASPL 701).

The Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.); Law

is the doctoral program in the Faculty of Law. The core of the program is a substantial thesis that makes an original contribution to legal scholarship. Students must pass a Comprehensive Exam - Law (LAWG 701). Students are also required to take CMPL 641 Theoretical Approaches to Law.

The Doctor of Civil Law (D.C.L.) in Law; Comparative Law

is the doctoral program in the Institute of Comparative Law of the Faculty of Law. The core of the program is a substantial thesis that makes an original contribution to legal scholarship. Students must pass a Comprehensive Exam (CMPL 701). Students are also required to take CMPL 641 Theoretical Approaches to Law.

The Doctor of Civil Law is a research degree offered by the Faculty of Law. Candidates who do not hold a McGill law degree may be required to take two or three courses designed to introduce them to the McGill professors and resources available in their field.

The degree will be awarded, at the earliest, after the completion of three years of residence in the Faculty. In the case of a candidate holding an LL.M. from McGill or an equivalent degree from another university, the residency requirement may be reduced to two years of study beyond the Master's degree, with the approval of the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office, upon recommendation of the Graduate Studies Committee of the Faculty of Law.

All candidates are must pass the Comprehensive Examination, normally after one year in residence.

The principal basis for evaluation is a doctoral thesis of up to 400 pages. It must constitute a significant contribution to legal knowledge, evidencing in concept and execution the original work of the candidate. Its form must be suitable for publication. The thesis must be submitted within four years of completion of the residency requirement.

17.5 Course Descriptions

Students preparing to register should consult the Web at www.mcgill.ca/minerva (click on Class Schedule) for the most up-to-date list of courses available; courses may have been added, rescheduled or cancelled after this Calendar went to press. Class Schedule lists courses by term and includes days, times, locations, and names of instructors.

Courses with numbers ending D1 and D2

are taught in two consecutive terms (most commonly Fall and Winter). Students must register for both the D1 and D2 components. No credit will be given unless both components (D1 and D2) are successfully completed in consecutive terms.

The course credit weight is given in parentheses after the title.

l Denotes courses not offered in 2004-05.
INSTITUTE OF AIR AND SPACE LAW COURSES
ASPL 613 Government Regulation of Air Transport.
(3) Economic regulation of air transport and navigation, deregulation, liberalization, open skies. Economic and regulatory theories, competition, anti-trust regulation. Status, negotiation, and implementation of international agreements on air services.
ASPL 632 Comparative Air Law.
(3) Comparative approaches to air law. Selected problems of private law not codified by international conventions including product liability; government liability for certification and inspection of aircraft; ATC liability; aviation insurance; fleet financing; leasing.
ASPL 633 Public International Air Law.
(3) Sources of public international law relating to the air space and its aeronautical uses. International aviation organizations and their law-making functions. Legal responses to aviation terrorism.
ASPL 636 Private International Air Law.
(3) Sources of private international air law. Conflicts of laws. Unification of law of liability. Liability for damage on the surface, liability of the ATC and CNS/ATM providers. Rights in aircraft and their international recognition.
ASPL 637 Space Law: General Principles.
(3) Examination of the role of international law in the regulation of outer space activities.
ASPL 638 Law of Space Applications.
(3) The legal implications of various space applications, such as telecommunications and the role therein of various international organizations; remote sensing by satellites; space stations; commercial and military uses of outer space.
ASPL 639 Government Regulation of Space Activities.
(3) (Restriction: Open to undergraduate students with the permission of the Associate Dean.) National public and private law and regulatory regimes governing space activities, particularly those that are carried out by private entities for commercial purposes.
ASPL 690 Master's Thesis 1.
(3) Preparation of thesis proposal.
ASPL 691 Master's Thesis 2.
(3) Preparation of literature review.
ASPL 692 Master's Thesis 3.
(6) Thesis research report.
ASPL 693 Master's Thesis 4.
(12) Completion of thesis.
ASPL 694 Master's Thesis 5.
(3) Thesis research report.
ASPL 701 Comprehensive - Air/Space Law.
(0) (Restriction: DCL graduate students in Air and Space Law.) An examination that must be passed by all doctoral candidates in order to continue in the doctoral program.
FACUTY OF LAW 500-700 LEVEL COURSES
Courses open to undergraduate and graduate students
BUS2 500 Copyright and Trademark Theory.
(3) (Prerequisite: BUS2 463) (Restriction: Not open to first year students) Various topics in copyright and/or trademark. Copyright: idea-expression dichotomy and the tension between public and private domain. Trademark: embodiment of goodwill; uniqueness versus genericity; the nature of use; the scope of statutory versus common law protection. Regarding both: impact of international norms; impact of technology.
BUS2 501 Patent Theory and Policy.
(3) (Prerequisite: BUS2 463) (Restriction: Not open to first year students) Examination and critical assessment of the justifications of patent law; the tension between the public domain and private monopoly control; examination of international patent protection; international conventions touching on patent law, international trade instruments; examination of patents in relation to new technology: biotechnology, the Internet and business methods.
CMPL 500 Aboriginal Peoples and the Law.
(3) Current legal topics relating to native peoples, including the concept of aboriginal title, and constitutional aspects of contemporary land claims. Aspects of Canadian law relating to native peoples, their constitutional status, and hunting and fishing rights.
l
CMPL 501 Jurisprudence.
(3) The main schools of jurisprudence and the most significant writings, particularly contemporary writings, in legal philosophy.
CMPL 504 Feminist Legal Theory.
(3) Feminist theory and its relevance and application to law, including feminist methodologies in law, the public versus private dichotomy, and changing conceptions of equality.
l
CMPL 505 Advanced Jurisprudence.
(2) An advanced course on selected topics in legal theory.
l
CMPL 506 Legal Theory.
(3) The philosophical basis of private law, from a comparative and historical perspective.
CMPL 507 Linguistic and Literary Approaches to Law.
(2) The techniques of linguistic and literary analysis and their contribution to the interpretation and evaluation of legal texts.
CMPL 508 Research Seminar 1.
(2) Research seminar to be offered by members of the Faculty or visiting professors, to permit research in legal traditions and legal theory in areas not covered by other courses in the program.
CMPL 509 Research Seminar 2.
(2) Research seminar to be offered by members of the Faculty or visiting professors, to permit research in legal traditions and legal theory in areas not covered by other courses in the program.
CMPL 510 Roman Law.